Programmatic OOH's strength lies in content, canvas and context- by Glen Wilson

For a legacy medium like out-of-home, there are a number of crucial factors to consider when gearing up for an automated future, writes Posterscope’s MD, Glen Wilson
Digital out-of-home (DOOH) is increasingly being used in more flexible, dynamic ways and integrating more and more varied data sources, consequently allowing us to display ever more relevant content to audiences.
As a result of these advancements, programmatic OOH capabilities are accelerating at pace now too. You can’t go far without reading or hearing about OOH programmatic at the moment, both in the UK and across the globe.
We have seen announcements recently from a number of media owners launching programmatic capabilities, and I think these developments will only continue to intensify in the coming months.
But while all these media owners have announced tangible, exciting and significant developments, with substantial resource and investment behind them, there are still differing views about what programmatic means for the OOH medium, and perhaps more importantly, the benefits it will offer to advertisers.
As programmatic media developed alongside the digital and mobile media model, the programmatic transactional element adapted simultaneously to become automated.
There are several considerations to automate that transactional element for a legacy medium like OOH, not least taking into account physical inventory. Therefore Programmatic OOH is being defined in many different ways and it is yet to be determined which trading model will ultimately win out – Programmatic Guaranteed, Private Marketplace or RTB/Open Exchange.
Running alongside the debate over transactional models is the planning opportunities that programmatic can provide. As media owners invest in API systems that match real-time availability with data sources this will certainly enable faster, more efficient planning by specialists and agencies. Almost all the major OOH players in the UK are working to deliver this to some extent in 2017.
For the Posterscope team, however, the most exciting and important aspect of programmatic OOH is the transformation that automated ad-serving of creative has enabled. The ability to tailor content based on real-time data optimisation is potentially the biggest single step forward for the OOH medium in decades.
Numerous studies have shown that the more relevant and contextual an advertising message is, the more it resonates with an audience. This is particularly true for OOH, where a consumer’s location, state-of-mind and purpose plays an immensely influential role.
Key findings from Theoretical VirtuoCity Research in the effectiveness of this “dynamic difference” revealed that ad-serving relevant content by audience increases the overall effectiveness of a campaign by +15%.
Furthermore, we know this makes a difference to a brand’s interaction with their audience. The research from VirtuoCity also revealed that using dynamic DOOH to deliver a more contextually relevant message increases advertising awareness by 18%, recall of the specific creative messages by 53% and creative/brand perceptions by 11%.
We’ve seen huge investment in digital screens in the past few years and by leveraging the agility and flexibility of these increasingly digital networks, we can utilise real-time planning to deliver pieces of communication automatically, in a given time or place, driven by pre-programmed rules.
Additionally we have the increased ability to ad-serve and optimise creative delivery with messages that contain dynamic elements and, informed by data, reflect more closely what audiences are thinking, feeling and doing at those moments.
We are already serving creative content that adapts to multiple, real-time feeds, such as weather, traffic flow, sales, social media trends and a multitude of other business drivers, via the Liveposter platform, along with creative content drawn from pre-produced work or created and edited in real time in response to these data triggers.
Unfortunately this dynamic capability is far from being used to its full potential and is currently the award-winning work of the few rather than the many.
More than the new types of trading models, it is this customisable aspect of OOH programmatic that is capable of transforming the creative potential of the medium, attracting new advertisers to it, building its overall share of media spend and, most importantly, delivering dramatically more effective campaigns.
This is this is where the OOH industry needs to focus, communicating this world of possibility to advertisers and the agencies that represent them.
Via: MediaTel
 

Ben Milne from Posterscope Japan discusses OOH advertising applications for AI at Ad Week Asia

Ichiro Jinnai, Director of Out of Home Media Services Division at Dentsu Inc., hosted a panel on Artificial Intelligence in the real world at Advertising Week Asia, with a focus on the ways AI can be monetized. Japan has 10% of its population in the cities, and this is estimated to grow to 50% by 2020. Current metrics and usage of IoT predicts that AI will help make the cities more efficient, able to handle the population growth, and even AI will be able to predict future trends.
Microsoft worked on a project with London Underground subway based on using AI to predict malfunctions. For example, after accumulating data on an escalators mechanical information, such as oil, hours of usage, age of parts, etc., and comparing against social data of users in the stations area of that escalator, it could be predicted when the equipment would fail. Microsofts studies also found that the AI predictions were more accurate than relying on equipment engineers predictions. Microsoft has not only done these studies on escalators in the London Underground, but also on elevators and vehicles in the United States. There is a huge amount of things connected to the IoT and collecting a ton of data, and by using that data, AI is predicting the future.
Hiroshi Ohta, President & Co-Founder of Cloudian presented a more specific and in-use AI campaign.
The Deepad Project test case took place in Roppongi area. The large billboard up on the building used an attached camera to take photos of the cars in traffic. The AI would identify the manufacturer, model and year of each car approaching, and the billboard would change the displayed advertisement to match the profile of the car model owner.
The AI would show a golfing ad on the billboard for a luxury car, but for a family-model car the ad would change to something more appropriate. The image above shows the AI process: “Deep Learning is AI requiring training.” For example, the AI platform has 337 models with over 5000 per model, and the AI is brought close to the location where the camera will go, like a parking lot, and the AI will train on the cars in the parking lot. For Cloudian, OOH advertisement application of AI is already in use, and collecting traffic as marketing data is soon to start.
Responsive Facial Recognition uses deep learning algorithms to anonymously detect gender, facial expression, age, and composition of passing audience to serve responsive content on an advertising screen, Ben Milne, Managing Director, Posterscope Japan, explains. Posterscope uses this platform to make OOH digital AI Poster advertisements that can read the audience and adjust the display in real time. Posterscope then gave the AI algorithms to adjust the DNA of the poster and experiment with images and text. As the AI learned and gathered data in regard to what was most effective in the passing, public audience, Posterscope found not only the expected peaks and valleys in audience response, but that the AI found some images to be effective that perhaps normally an agency wouldnt think to use. For example, an image of a dolphin was effective in a coffee campaign, but its unlikely that a person at an agency would think to use a dolphin in a coffee advertising campaign. Ben poses the question, what will it take, or how will it come to be, that a person could trust an AI to make correct creative decisions?
It is expected there will be a paradigm shift in the marketing and advertising industry in the usage of big data and how it feeds AI, but also the monetization of using this technology for targeted advertising will change OOH advertising.
Via: 4Traders
 
 

Why in the future all advertising will be experienced

Emerging tech is causing advertising to become increasingly multi-sensory and fully immersive as it moves off screen. Michael Brown, Managing Director of MKTG discusses with Campaign Magazine.

Technophiles the world over are looking forward to a day when all forms of content are freed from its present confinement within the four edges of a screen; to be fully multi-sensory, 360-immersive, and at some point beyond the far off horizon, indistinguishable from the real world. The message will not be contained by the medium.

How far are we from such a horizon, and are we sprinting or strolling there are questions that a lot of clever people in white lab coats are posing.

VR may take us a few tantalising strides closer. Some will groan heavily at yet another mention of this particular tech, but if we move our focus away from the headsets and instead look at how the content can be deployed and enjoyed, then interesting signposts emerge.

Earlier this year I was at the launch of the Allianz-sponsored Drone Racing League. A world championship heat will be taking place in the capital as part of London Tech Week this June. Sky were also present to announce their ownership of the broadcast rights. They intend to show the proceedings from an entirely different perspective; those with a heavy dispensation towards all things geek will already know that drone racers pilot their craft through goggles linked to a Go-Pro camera mounted on the drone. This means that home viewers with a Sky package and VR headsets can get closer into the action in an immersive sense – a pilot’s eye view.

Can’t get a ticket to the Champions League Final? Experience it at home through the headsets from multiple immersive perspectives; as a player, the referee, from the dug out, in the crowd.

Home viewing of sports is set to become a little less passive. It should also open up new channels for a broadcaster to sell to individual brands. A brand taking a behind the scenes approach may wish to sponsor the home dug-out experience for instance. Another, wishing to build on their brand ambassador program may look to extend their sponsorship rights to create an immersive viewing experience using the footage from a micro camera mounted on their player.

Such a way of viewing sport would be very intriguing technologically as you could mix live footage with VR as an exclusive to the home viewer: One could easily imagine Antonio Conte virtually tapping you on the shoulder during a live broadcast telling you to get your boots on.

Meanwhile, there are tech companies who have taken an active dislike to those clunky goggles. Globally there are circa 200 companies developing goggles-free VR to achieve a more inclusive, mass participatory approach.

Dassault Systèmes has long been a pioneer in 3D experience. At its Paris HQ, the Cubic Immersion Room offers an experience where every surface, including the floor, is a screen. The technology, known in the business as a “Cave” (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), required that users wore a headset featuring several antennae which calibrated the graphic render on the screens with every movement around the room to more accurately create the illusion of perspective. When I visited, I was able to walk, with several other colleagues, around an unfolding render of Paris, stroll up any boulevard, go into any building, take the stairs or lift and walk into any room – the experience fell just short of being able to order a croissant.

Fast-forward to the present day, and the French giant has been doing interesting integrations with VR headsets and Immersion Rooms. This includes advancements that are far superior to commercially available VR such as the ability to see your own body. Users can recognise and interact with other people also wearing the headsets in the Cave. Not in an atavistic sense either; you can meet a colleague in the room and recognize that it is your colleague and not a graphic construct.

The practical application of this technology is being used in a myriad ways; an architect through to a product designer can construct, test and more importantly collaborate and discuss their grand vision with their colleagues in the Cave before a single foundation stone is laid, or a patent applied for.

This is all very well for the present day, but there is an emerging technology whose potential has had VC investors and technology gurus foaming with enthusiasm: Lightvert’s Echo technology is a light-triggered illusion capable of creating large scale graphics, seemingly in empty space. The images exist only in the user’s eye and not in reality.
The roll out of Echo displays is not limited by user uptake of wearable and mobile tech, or in fact the current planning laws and policies that currently govern Lightvert’s primary target customer; the out-of-home advertising industry.

Chief executive Daniel Sidden believes the world is now ready for Echo, citing that emerging mobile tech will enable interaction with the digital realm on a more natural and fluent level.

Sidden argues that: “Visual and audio based mixed reality technologies, such as HoloLens and Google’s new audio assistant technology will become ubiquitous and the opportunities for digital OOH in this area alone are clearly phenomenal.”

As this technology becomes yet more sophisticated, we should begin to see exciting developments for advertising. Technically any surface, or gesture, or motion sensor could be used to trigger content while people are out and about in the built environment or any open space.

That content might be an evolution of Echo’s static graphic renders into moving imagery, and from there, a further evolution into 360-immersive micro experiences. Sidden is unequivocal about the ability of content to break out from its present day limitations. “Media that was once previously confined to screens will be integrated into our every day actions and be capable of working with us and for us at all times, eliminating the barrier between physical and digital engagement.”

There you have it folks: the day is not far off when all advertising will be experienced.

Via: Campaign Live 

A review of the Science Museum's latest exhibition 'Our Lives in Data'

By Megin Gauntlett, Insight Executive
Being part of the *multiply team at Posterscope, we are more than comfortable with data as valuable currency. We pride ourselves on using the best, proprietary approaches to data in order to understand consumers better. This understanding in turn enables us to deliver the most targeted messaging, in the right moment and in the right location.
But what is the viewpoint of the consumer? How much do they actually know about the capture and use of their data? And when put in the consumer’s shoes, would you still think that the scores, reams and mountains of data collected and cleaned regarding your life is interesting or invasive? We can sometimes think about consumers as though they are different and separate to us and we must be careful that we don’t create a practice of dehumanising data.
We wanted to go to the Science Museum’s current exhibition, Our Lives in Data, to see their approach to education around data’s usage and how children, in particular, are shaping their views in a personalised, but essentially trackable, life.
Our Lives in Data was made up of four different sections; transport and smart cities, the IoT, genomic and social. The first and last are areas in which Posterscope have a large amount of experience. We use transport data every day in our work as Location Experts, defining how audiences move around the city in order to better understand how to reach them in the most relevant ways. We regularly use social data in our planning tools to see what is resonating for consumers, how they feel about brands and lifestyles and what they are gravitating towards in terms of behaviours.
The exhibition was set up as a blend of static exhibitions and interactive experiences. In the transport section, there was a data visualisation of Bond St Station showcasing how new tube stations and transit hubs are designed using predictive consumer data – knowing how people move through the station and streets surrounding it to enable city planners to create better, frictionless travel. This was interesting given Posterscope’s new partnership with Digit Group in the smart cities space. Using data to understand a location better and predict behaviours from a design perspective is only a decade or so old. But now, with connected payments, mobile signal data and the like, we can make the city work harder for its inhabitants.
Moving through into the IoT section, we saw connected toys showcased with variant degrees of consumer uptake – we have all heard the story of the doll that learned to speak not so kid-friendly words. This section also featured a type of paint that could be used on routers to block Wi-Fi signal pickups from external users. Considering Wi-Fi signals is a key method of understanding a location’s footfall at present, this paint was a surprise to some in the group. The exhibition also discussed whether consumers have been educated enough on the options available to them in this area when it comes to privacy of signals themselves (regardless of the fact the data collected is not being used to see individual information).
We then saw how genomic experts were using VR headsets to navigate their way through huge amounts of genetic data to better treat patients, even before they are sick. The exhibition talked around how the technology which began as a platform for better gaming has actually had a remarkable effect on how doctors and scientists can view microscopic and subatomic worlds. Given the complexity of educating children in genomic data, this area of the exhibition remained top line but it was a great way to show how a familiar technology like VR can be used to solve complex human issues.
Finally, we moved on to the social data area of the exhibition, with some very interesting facts for children and adults alike. For example, they shared that ‘Facebook users have four times the audience online than they estimate’ and that ‘within two weeks, 71% of people self-censor their own Facebook posts’. These statistics were interesting from a consumer perspective – we all know we self-edit but the fact it was post-rationalised editing showed how consumers are highly conscious about the image (and data) that they share with their ‘friends.’ The exhibition referred to ‘personality data’ or what we would call consumer trends.
There was an interactive element which replicated a basic planning tool – you could select which brands you like, and to what scale, and the tool would punch out a more personalised ad for you at the end. This is of course extremely pertinent to our world of dynamic adverts where Posterscope delivers relevant advertising content against specific audiences and mind-sets. It was surprising and exciting to see how the world of dynamic advertising was shown to kids and visitors, creating a positive connection and awareness around why ads were personalised to them.
Finally there was a video debate from the Policy Director of Facebook and Dr David Stillwell and he is a lecturer in Big Data Analytics at Cambridge University discussing data privacy and the future. Their conclusion was that consumers are demanding a personalised world with both brands and platforms understanding them and creating experiences with their individual preferences in mind. However, proceeding with caution was the message of the day – safe handling of data is the top priority.
In conclusion, visiting Our Lives in Data wasn’t about learning new data-trends, it was about understanding how the increasingly complex area of our business and the world going forward is being communicated to the younger generation. Brad Gilbert from the *multiply team said “the exhibition’s content may not have been new for us but it’s interesting to see an exhibition that explains simply to the public their data is captured and used. People are becoming more informed and empowered about the handling of their data, and it was important for us to see how this exhibition presented this to the public.’
Our Lives in Data captured the key areas of data in our daily lives, but it also enabled visitors to think about what would be missing in a world without data and the see-saw we all balance to improve our daily lives vs living an Orwellian existence. Given all the debate on this in our industry, it is important for us to remember that not all consumers are data experts but that we are all consumers.
Our Lives in Data is open until 01/09/2017 and you can find out more about the exhibition here.

Research confirms the positive effect of Piccadilly Lights on brand image

By Miriam Buireu, Account Director, PSI
Piccadilly Circus has a long & rich history as an iconic landmark for London and the UK. So when Ocean and Land Securities’ announced exciting plans for the new Piccadilly Lights, creating a unique and prestigious new platform for brands to reach global consumers in the UK’s capital, it represented far more than just an upgrade of an OOH advertising location.
We wanted to understand what Piccadilly Circus really means to people, how they perceive the brands that advertise there, and how the planned improvement might effect this.
PSI have carried out a piece of research to understand how consumers currently view Piccadilly Circus and Piccadilly Lights, how brands currently advertising on Piccadilly Lights are perceived and most importantly to understand the benefits of the proposed improvements to the site.
Methodology
Earlier this year, we spoke to 300 people about Piccadilly in face-to-face interviews. A third of them were International tourists, and all had visited the area at least twice in the last week.
This is what we learned:
Famous, busy and iconic

  • Current attitudes towards Piccadilly Circus as an area are positive with consumers agreeing that the area is seen as a famous, busy and iconic (99%, 91% and 85% respectively)
  • The Piccadilly Lights clearly dominate the area – 100% of our UK respondents notice the large illuminated screens on their visits to the area.
  • The first things consumers think about when asked about the Piccadilly Lights relate to its size, prominence, and colourful display. It is also described as a vibrant, entertaining and modern landmark. (94% of responses had positive connotations)
  • The Piccadilly Lights as they currently stand are well-loved – the majority of people agree that they have a relevant place in a global city like London (95%); that they are iconic (92%), and grab attention (92%) from passers-by

Powerful advertising

  • Consumers overwhelmingly recalled the Piccadilly Lights over all other forms of advertising in the area – 8 out of 10 responded spontaneously named the Piccadilly Lights
  • Brands advertising on the screen enjoy a wealth of benefits –2/3 of those respondents who said they notice advertisers on Piccadilly Lights agree that they are global, modern and innovative brands.
  • Brands who advertise on the Piccadilly Lights have a universal appeal – 86% of consumers view them as “global brands”
  • 95% of consumers think that the site “is the kind of advertising I’d expect to see in a global city like London… it is the kind of site you see big brands advertised on”

A glimpse of the future….

  • Consumer sentiment is very positive, enthusiastic and receptive to these changes. Overall, 83% of consumers feel that the proposed changes to the site will make for more memorable advertising
  • 90% think that the introduction of the rotational basis of advertisements will afford brands more noticeability
  • 93% think that the opportunity for one brand to dominate the screen will afford brands more impactful messaging.
  • Overall 86% consumers agree that modernising the screen will modernise the entire area and a further 77% agree that the improvements to the site will not impact the heritage of Piccadilly Lights 86% agree they will take more notice of brands advertising on the new Piccadilly screen.

These remarkably positive attitudes about Piccadilly and the planned changes demonstrate the vast opportunity for global brands. In Piccadilly, advertisers can genuinely connect with on-the-go audiences and create advertising which is more powerful because of the context in which it is seen. We’re excited about what the future holds for brand advertising at Piccadilly.
Via: Ocean Outdoor
 

Ad Week Europe 2017: Remembering the big picture

By Rachel Taylor, Strategic Manager at Posterscope
I was lucky enough to spend time at this year’s Advertising Week Europe to listen to all of the fantastic speakers debating the key questions for our industry. The core contemporary pillars were well covered; programmatic, content, mobile and agency structures stood out as key themes. However, there also seemed to be a growing focus on wider socio-cultural events, such as Brexit or Trump’s election, which sit outside our industry but still impact our decisions.
Whatever form Brexit takes, it will have implications for both client marketing budgets, be that positive or negative, and for consumer attitudes and spending power. Consequentially, there are still debates and big questions for the advertising industry to be involved in. Thursday’s ‘Open Minds, Open Boarders’ debate aptly highlighted the issue of junior creative talent and the need to maintain diversity if we are to grow London’s creative community. However, I feel one of the most interesting underlying conclusions of this talk was that the implications of Brexit on the industry are all still uncertain and there is nothing we can stick our teeth into until the dust begins to settle.
A strong theme this year was the role of emotion in technology and data as well as remembering the human element at the centre of advertising campaigns. Ravleen Beeston of Microsoft looked at technology’s empathetic potential, demonstrating chat bots which can anticipate and mitigate potentially fractious moments such as splitting a drinks bill. Interestingly however, the debate around these kinds of innovations kept returning to the warning that we should not allow ourselves to fall into a bubble and design campaigns around technology consumers aren’t ready for.
Indeed, the ‘Future of Tech and The Millennial Consumer’ stage profiled businesses which were all firmly rooted in their audience understanding, be that to alleviate the struggling care industry or redesigning dating for queer women. In the case of Grabble, the business completely pivoted based on the new audience understanding that their audience wanted more boutique labels and they needed to appeals to a consumer with more disposable income than their original student target. A great example of audience truths designing the product rather than fitting an audience to the platform.
Certainly, the advertising industry now places great focus on ensuring messaging is rooted in audience understanding but this was a good reminder that the same is true for innovation. While some technologies may have become commonplace in media land, we should not get ahead of ourselves and always root design in the human experience.
In as much as we should be remembering the wider world experience effects our consumers, the broader world picture also effects our relationship with our clients. While we are good at watching the competitor environment and market forces which will be shaping client pressures, Rory Sutherland made a fantastic point when he argued we are limiting ourselves when we only speak to our clients about MarComs. That is certainly where our specialism lies but the power of our data and strategic thinking can stretch must further, answering at least wider marketing questions.
Indeed, Posterscope have started pushing beyond the bounds of OOH media to employ our location expertise in wider location analysis projects powered by our award winning ECOS platform. This allows us to explore a range of wider client challenges, be that the location understanding powering a wider communications brief or broad location mapping of audiences by behaviour to help clients really understand what is really happening on the ground. Similarly, MKTG have pushed beyond experiential with their Smart Bench roll out, demonstrating that we can also be part of the smart city revolution and shape the future design of the cities we live in.
It’s an exciting time to be in the industry. There is a wealth of potential for us to apply our audience data to business intelligence and we should be thinking big in order to make the most of it. But if we are to turn this potential into success two watch outs stand out: don’t go too big for the humans we are speaking too and don’t sell ourselves too small to clients who will then look to someone else.

Ad Week Europe 2017: Getting back to what works

By Brad Gilbert, Account Director at Posterscope
Initially I struggled to write-up ‘what I found interesting’ at AdWeek. My initial reaction was there wasn’t a great deal of new things, nothing I hadn’t read about elsewhere from trade publishers, blog posts etc. I was disappointed and disillusioned. But then I realised there was no need to be upset; I didn’t need new things. My neophilia relaxed.
Hearing experienced heads, discuss tried and tested principles and how it relates to now was what I enjoyed and needed. This was no more apparent than in the Marketing Society’s Uncomfortable Conversation. Hearing Dave Trott is always a delight and reminded me that what he’s done in the past and continues to do now comes down to simple thinking we can all emulate. Marketing and advertising is not rocket science and it shouldn’t be anywhere near as complicated as we sometimes make it; it should however, make the complicated simple. Just read a couple of his books and writing and you’ll get it.
Hearing from Zaid Al-Qassab (BT) too lifted me up. He reiterated his stance on the current issue in marketing of two tribes (customer centric people that don’t know how to connect in the modern world alongside click harvesters who don’t understand customers) and how solving this divide is vital to marketing success. This wasn’t a fancy new concept but a point that persists and is important to act upon.
I like what these people have to say! They’re not talking about ‘revolutions’ that make the headlines but are instead focusing on simple steps to take to make marketing work (better). Not fluffy chat around the latest ‘ecosystem’ but persistent questions we need to ask like ‘what clients are paying for, what they’re getting and if it will work’.
I have come away from AdWeek more confident than ever of taking on a crap brief and calling it just that, in taking on those that snivel at the ‘traditional’ medium of OOH and telling them ‘hey, it still works!’ New things can be great but not all innovations work, and if they do they may not work in the same way for each client or campaign.
I found fitting AdWeek in around pitches and the day to day was more difficult than ever this year but perhaps more important than ever to get some much needed perspective on what actually needs to be done. I am breathing a sigh of relief I won’t have to research rocket-science to do good work.

MWC 2017 MOBILE: The force behind the fourth industrial revolution

By Alberto García Martínez, Posterscope Spain
During Mobile World Congress this year I was able to experience some of the key technologies that are defining the future of the digital and connected economy: 5G, sensors, machine learning, virtual reality, artificial intelligence, robotics, smart conversational interfaces, new hardware, augmented reality, drones….and at the core of everything: mobile.
We are living in a permanent technological revolution that is changing the way people interact with each other, with brands and with the world. And at the heart of this revolution is mobile, which today has connected over five billion people and is taking us into a hyper-connected society with; mobile networks connecting sensors to everything around us, creating smarter cities, ubiquitous connectivity and a new programmable world.
At MWC it was clear that mobile is the force behind the Fourth Industrial Revolution and that it provides an amazing opportunity for OOH, whose ecosystem is evolving through new data capabilities and interactive formats. The opportunity was highlighted by some of the core themes of the MWC including: networks, platforms & data, machine learning to AI, consumer IOT & smart cities and content & media.
Networks: Most Mobile Network Operators (MNO´s) are developing their networks to make connectivity ubiquitous, faster and more intelligent. This requires investment and therefore the creation of new revenue streams. Those that recognise the unique value behind their location-based data are developing new models to monetize it.  We’re seeing how companies have introduced new business services such as Telefonica’s launch of LUCA, its new big data unit for corporate customers and how other MNO´s are reaching agreements with third-party companies to mine and capitalize on their data in advertising.
Platforms & Data: At the core of any business in the digital economy is software.  Companies are investing massive amounts of money to develop platforms that add cognitive intelligence to services and interactions with consumers.  Telefonica presented its fourth platform, AURA, which will enable users to manage their digital experiences with the company, and control the data generated by using its products and services, in a transparent and secure manner.
The more we work with customer data however the more important trust and transparency becomes.  The recent 2017 GSMA annual industry survey showed that 54.3% of consumers will allow their operator to share their data with third parties, but only data they have previously approved to do so.  So as consumers increasingly understand the value of their data and look for value in return, we also need technology that is able not just to predict their needs and deliver that value but to develop deeper relationships and conversations that ultimately drive transactions.
From Machine Learning to AI: Robots are already taking over the world!
Perhaps not to the level of Sonny in ‘I, Robot’ but machines are already smart enough to understand humans feelings, predict behaviors and open conversations.  The combination of personalization and tailored creative content and the ability to deliver a personalized experience is already well on its way.   A recurring topic of conversation at MWC was around how language interfaces and chatbots will become standard in the relationship between brands with their customers
Content & Media: All this “science” needs creativity to be effective so getting the content right is critical now and in the years to come.
With messaging apps and chatbots offering an alternative way for customers and businesses to communicate, we are just a step away from conversational commerce and conversational location-based advertising, and closer to being able to serve fully personalized content.
Netflix explained how they are growing by using data to help create relevant content that appeals to specific audiences.  Similarly, I saw MNO´s also trying to position themselves in the content marketplace, not just as distributors but as producers, as they recognize the huge potential for growth this offers.
Broadcasters, including Eurosport and Discovery, showcasing at MWC explained how they are starting to unlock the potential of VR and how the introduction of 360-degree quality content is massively increasing downloads of their apps.  I also saw stands from other types of content owners, such as the NBA, LaLiga and the Korean Olympics Committee, all of whom see the opportunity to deploy new audiovisual models and simultaneously diversify revenue streams.
The way people consume content is influencing the evolution of out of home and the speed at which it develops.  AR is redefining people´s interactions in the real world and in the future we will see more “Pokemon Go” style executions that build communities from the interaction between the physical and the digital world. Likewise, gaming will bring massive opportunities in the convergence of entertainment, technology and media in a physical space. Some of the most common buzzwords emerging from the sessions were #audiencegrowth #playerengagement #esports #dronesleaguerace #etoys #VR and of course #AR.
Consumer IOT and Smart Cities:  All of the elements above come together to create a new ecosystem that allows us to interact with the world and the world to interact with us.
For example, NTT Dotcomo showcased how it is using data from sensors, mobile and social to better organize the public transport in Japan, including a system that informs taxi drivers in real time what areas of the city require their service.
The efficiencies this creates in terms of economics, sustainability and service are enormous, and this growth in connections out of the home are key to meeting the demand of today´s consumer.  Almost every business at MWC demonstrated an understanding of the importance of location, and how to deliver value, based on customer location.
We are seeing this connectivity emerging in cities all over the world and it opens up new and exciting media and marketing opportunities for brands and agencies. We will have even more information about where people are moving to and from, their modes of transport, the destinations they are visiting and so much more.  Using this data, we will be able to deliver relevant and targeted content to the right person (or right people) in the right place at the most appropriate time.
Mobile World Congress was an intellectually effervescent experience and I am certainly very excited to be an active participant in The Fourth Industrial Revolution.
 

Can programmatic trading revolutionise OOH?

Above: Stefan Lameire, Cadi Jones, William Eccleshare, and Justin Cochrane, Clear Channel UK CEO
More outdoor owners may follow Clear Channel’s move to launch an in-house platform as digital screens have already transformed out-of-home, allowing brands to tailor creative by time of day and location, and driving up revenues for media owners.

With digital approaching 50% of the UK OOH market by revenue, the industry is betting that programmatic trading can further push up sales by encouraging automation and more efficient buying.

Clear Channel will roll out its programmatic platform in the UK in March. Initially, it will only feature inventory from its premium digital OOH offering, Storm, which has screens in 30 locations. But it will be followed by the addition of nearly 6,000 DOOH sites.

The platform lets media buyers book inventory on an automated basis at a fixed price. Eventually, Clear Channel hopes to make all of its trades via the programmatic platform.

“Programmatic has completely changed the way we sell and how the medium is bought,” William Eccleshare, chairman and chief executive of Clear Channel International, says, describing the platform as the company’s “big bet on the future”.

Rubicon Project partnered Bitposter to launch a programmatic marketplace for OOH inventory in the UK in 2015 and Kinetic introduced its programmatic offering in 2016. However, neither has made a substantial impact on the market so far.

“Without denigrating the efforts others have made, I don’t think anyone has done it [OOH programmatic trading and deployment] in any kind of scale,” Eccleshare says. “What’s being done is automated trading. This is more than that.”

Clear Channel claims its platform is “truly programmatic” because it is a fully transparent, automated system that will allow buyers to monitor price,inventory and performance. This, and the desire to control full intellectual property rights, was behind the company’s decision to invest in its own platform.

Eccleshare admits Clear Channel, like others, has come under pressure to introduce programmatic to DOOH as it becomes the norm in other sectors. About 70% of online media was traded programmatically in the UK in 2016, according to Zenith.

“It makes our medium easier to buy,” Eccleshare says, “and we, as a media owner, must embrace anything that removes barriers to purchase.”

However, one of the great attractions of OOH is its broad reach at a time when audiences for other media are fragmenting. There may be limits to how much brands want to use programmatic to micro-target their messaging.

Glen- programmaticVia: Campaign Live

Stephen Whyte on how programmatic is transforming the creative potential of OOH

The least talked about but most interesting component of programmatic OOH is the transformation that automated ad-serving brings, writes Posterscope’s CEO.
Programmatic out-of-home has been discussed and written about a great deal in recent years and Clear Channel’s plans to accelerate the trading automation of its digital inventory will obviously fuel expectations and discussion further.
However, there are conflicting views about what programmatic could mean for this medium, how it might work and, most importantly, what the benefits to advertisers might be.
In many of the debates, I think that the most important and exciting aspect of programmatic OOH often gets overlooked. Probably because the obvious comparison is programmatic online, discussion tends to focus on the automation of transactions and which model – Programmatic Guaranteed, Private Marketplace or RTB/Open Exchange – is likely to emerge and prevail.
In my view, the answer to this in the short to medium term is Programmatic Guaranteed with each media owner pre-defining pricing by client. This is what Clear Channel announced last week.

In order for a truly biddable market to be established, audience trading metrics and protocols would have to be standardised and agreed across all media owners and agencies.
That’s not likely to be achieved any time soon although the UK is better-placed thanks to Route data than many international markets.
Furthermore, each media owner would have to establish a complex set of pricing rules for their inventory and transfer pricing control from their long-established sales teams and methodologies to a technology platform.
The online advertising market never had this legacy trading approach to overcome, but the cultural shift required for many OOH businesses will be significant.
Close behind the debates about transactional models come the planning opportunities. The provision of real time availability data APIs by media owners will undoubtedly enable faster, more efficient planning by specialists and agencies and almost all the major OOH players in the UK are working to deliver this to some extent in 2017.
But, for me, the least talked about but most interesting component of programmatic OOH is the transformation that automated ad-serving brings. As William Eccleshare noted in his Clear Channel presentation last week, the massive investment in digital screens that the industry has made over recent years has yet to be matched by the dramatic leap in the creative use of the medium that the investment enables.
In addition to being able to buy digital OOH in incredibly focused, targeted and flexible ways, it’s already possible (via platforms like Liveposter), to serve creative content that adapts to multiple, real-time data feeds.
These feeds can be anything from weather to traffic flows, sales, social media trends and other business drivers. Messages can be optimised by target audience subset, by location, by time and day. Advertising content can be drawn from a pool of pre-produced creative work or can be created and edited in real time, in response to relevant data triggers in any and every site location.
In a recent campaign we ran for a client, over 10,000 different creative executions were programmatically served over a two-week national campaign. This highly dynamic use of digital OOH is arguably the biggest single step forward for the OOH medium in decades.
The growth of digital screens in all their shapes and sizes is important and significant but the real power comes from the programmatic ad-serving technology that is available to deliver content to those screens.
It is this aspect of OOH programmatic that is capable of transforming the creative potential of the medium, of attracting new advertisers to it, of building its overall share of media spend and, most importantly, of delivering dramatically more effective campaigns.
And this, far more than the programmatic trading models, is what advertisers and the agencies that represent them should focus on more.
Via: Campaign Live