Flying Start – Federica Fattorusso talks to Campaign Magazine – Middle East.

Flying Start …  The aviation industry, like almost all other industries, has not been immune to the momentum of the digital revolution, changing significantly due to the increasing prevalence of technology in all aspects of travellers’ daily lives. When considering that last year young tourists alone spent $217bn on travel, with millennials seeing travel as more important than buying a home or paying off debt, we face a huge global trend that will only continue growing. Our region has not been shying away from this trend, but is riding the wave with full force. Dubai International airport is the world’s busiest for international travellers, with a 6.3 per cent year-on-year (Aug 2016 to Aug 2017) cumulative traffic increase. And 9,353,368 passengers were recorded during the first eight months of the year. Similarly, Abu Dhabi airport, the UAE’s second-busiest commercial hub, handled 10.1 million passengers in the first five months to May 31, an increase of 1.8 percent compared with the same period last year, which is in line with the prediction it will handle approximately 25 million passengers in 2017, compared with 24.5 million last year.
Read More …..
Federica Fattorrusso – Business Development Director, Posterscope MENA

Open Canvas: the best in outdoor (October 2017)

Two experts pick their favourite out of home campaigns and explain why their chosen work makes the most of the medium

Nicky Bullard, chairwoman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite

The sound of a smartphone hitting the ground screen-side down is a shattering experience. That’s why O2’s latest “Oops” out of home campaign is literally a cracking use of the medium. Not only is it simple, it made me laugh out loud, which a poster hasn’t done for a very long time. It’s also unexpected: focusing on the “Oops” moment by using apparently broken, cracked-looking billboards makes people do a double take. Posters normally stand neatly on their sites. Yes, we sometimes see the paper peeling off but we rarely see a wonky one.
The idea works well for OOH because of the scale: a poster is an “instant” medium, and this example is pretty darn instant (and huge). I’ve seen other elements of the campaign (eg TV spots, Instagram stories, Snapchat lenses) and none has the impact of OOH. It has achieved in three seconds what the TV ad (for the same message) tried to do in 30. It’s just a shame there weren’t more sites used. I love that lots of people didn’t realise these broken billboards were deliberate, despite the copy explaining it was for O2’s new screen-replacement offer.
One Twitter user tweeted: “It definitely isn’t [deliberate]. You’d never get it past health and safety…” That’s the best response any OOH campaign can have, showing how OOH can bring a creative idea and the brand behind it into my everyday world. I can walk past it. Look up. Take a picture. Tweet it. See it in my routine every day for as long as the campaign runs. I want to see more ads like this, that truly interact with the observer in a clever, humorous and ambitious way. Why not? Creatives love a poster – there shouldn’t be a block.
Sometimes maybe the media is chosen before the idea has come to light. Writing for a poster is a wonderful challenge. Ideally, you have to distil your thinking into three words or fewer and create something that stops people in their tracks. It’s hugely exciting.

Matt Davis, executive creative director, Red Brick Road

Such is the nation’s insatiable appetite for Premier League football that the TV audience is surely low-hanging fruit for the two main players, Sky and BT Sport.
Armchair football fans can’t get enough of the unscripted drama – frenetic, competitive, partisan and fame-filled catnip. But now, entering its third year as the sole other broadcaster, the challenges for BT Sport have, it appears, shifted. It now needs to be synonymous with sport, which means being a stand-alone broadcaster, not just a football-content-providing arm of a telecoms behemoth – because its sports portfolio has been substantially enriched.
BT Sport’s own narrative for the football soap opera clearly needed to be a more nuanced, meaty affair. But in addition to the Premier League, it now broadcasts UEFA Champions League, The Ashes, Aviva Premiership Rugby and UFC. That’s quite a roster, and it has lined up stars from each discipline to front its campaign.
So has it risen to the challenge? Very much so. The successful but blunt messaging and arresting football-focused imagery of the past two years has moved up a gear. Numerous OOH executions all appear under the weighty and memorable, “Where the best go head to head”. Nice bit of metre, nod to the vernacular, and seven words. A solid, idea-infused line.
But the OOH really comes to life with the photography. It’s a simple, almost old-fashioned idea really: two stars from different sports, colliding on a pitch, a merging of their talents. Slick post-production means the eye sees the action take place seamlessly and naturally in one location. My favourite is Saracens lock Maro Itoje attempting a textbook tackle on the twinkle-toed footballer Eden Hazard. Who’ll succumb? Who knows?
That’s the most pulsating of the executions: BT Sport is where the best go head to head, and that’s all we need to know. Two other memorable executions feature Joe Root on the cricket pitch high-fiving Luis Suarez, and Wayne Rooney having been beaten at boxing by Nicola Adams – the ref is about to raise her arm and Wayne’s distraught.
What I really like is the split-second it takes to recognise people, meld the contrasting parts in your mind and create the image. This increases dwell time by a beat, making the OOH campaign cut through, big time.
Gill open canvas 3

Via: Campaign Live

Mobile meets OOH is the sweet spot for location-based marketing

Location-based marketing combines the best of online and offline, of narrowcast and broadcast, of the real world and the virtual world.

The use of location in targeting marketing communication is not a new phenomenon but, fuelled by the explosion of mobile devices and the data trails they leave, it has become a significantly more effective tool in recent years.

As a result, it has been forecast that as much as 43% of all adspend will be location targeted by 2019.

But understanding where an audience is and serving marketing messages relevant to that specific place only represents one facet of what a location-based strategy can provide to marketers.

In my view, there are two other components that are arguably more significant in terms of their potential to transform marketing effectiveness.

The first is the cross-over between the digital world and the physical world.
As access to the online world becomes increasingly dominated by mobile devices, location-based marketing provides a meeting of online and offline, of narrowcast and broadcast, of the real world and the virtual world.

Working together, mobile marketing and out-of-home provide powerful synergies.

Our research shows that mobile click-through rates increase by up to 15% when supported by OOH, and a major piece of industry research conducted last year demonstrated that better performing OOH campaigns create a 38% uplift in short-term brand action taken via mobiles, with 66% of all actions being direct to the brand itself.

The second is the ability to go beyond simply knowing where your audience is at a particular time to understanding where they have come from, where they are going and, crucially, what they are thinking, feeling and doing in that location.

This depth of context is gold dust in terms of ensuring that marketing has the highest possible relevance and timeliness, and it’s this deeper level of insight that perhaps explains why 75% of marketers consider location-based marketing a vital part of their future marketing strategy.

The traditional criteria of targeting the right people in the right medium is complemented by the right place, the right moment and the right state of mind.

Location-based marketing is most immediately associated with mobile marketing but the location-specific search, browsing, social media and app usage data derived from mobile devices can also revolutionise all other, location-based media channels and disciplines.

Probably the most significant of these is OOH. The rich and complex data now available means that OOH planning can be done to a level of sophistication only dreamt about a few years ago, and data-led, dynamic ad-serving technology like our own Liveposter platform can optimise digital OOH content in real time.

In a recent campaign for Microsoft, we saw a 62% increase in ad recall in the areas when location-specific, mobile behavioural data was used to optimise the content and uplifts of over 50% are regularly attainable.

But this opportunity for marketers isn’t in any way seen as intrusive or unwelcome by consumers. Quite the opposite. In a major survey conducted by Dentsu Aegis, the parent company of Posterscope, across nine countries, 80% of respondents chose ‘relevance to location’ as their top pick in terms of the content they wanted to see on digital OOH screens.

It’s clear to see that location-based marketing is evolving at pace. Bruce Rogers, chief insight officer at Forbes Media recently described it as “marketing’s vital frontier”.

The scope and power of deeper data insights will help brands win when it comes to location-based marketing.

Stephen Whyte is chief executive of Posterscope

Open canvas: the best in outdoor

Two experts pick their favourite out of home campaigns and explain why their chosen work makes the most of the medium

Anna Carpen, executive creative director, 18 Feet & Rising


Dear 3,749 people who streamed It’s the End of the World As We Know It the day of the Brexit vote, Hang in there.” This is one of my favourite headlines from Spotify’s OOH campaign “Thanks 2016, it’s been weird”.
It was a year that ran away with itself. There was nothing we could do to tame it. All we could do was wallow in the music. Spotify cleverly used streaming data to bring to life some insights into our music listening habits. It picked up on the truth that not only is music a reflection of life, but so are the songs we listen to and the names we give our playlists – a good gauge of public mood. Localise this data and you’re onto a winner.
Yes – data can be boring. It lumps people into categories they don’t belong in; its sweeping generalisations are infuriating. But the way the data is used for this campaign is different. This is all about pulling out our human quirks – talking about things that are relatable, rather than stereotypical. The more insights creatives have, the more witty, entertaining and effective their OOH work can be.
That’s the wonderful thing about this campaign: the freshness of the insights, and the fact that it landed slap-bang in the middle of whatever we were all going through at the time.
It would be really interesting to be even more reactive with this campaign in digital spaces.
In 2016 we bade farewell to so many musical talents – and within minutes of the news of their death breaking, those beloved stars were propelled to the top of the streaming charts. Imagine if Spotify created these funny, relatable headlines based on that day’s news? Or if you could know how many people in your town were listening to DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince’s Summertime on a blazing hot day?
The art direction is bright, vibrant and true to Spotify’s Swedish heritage. Clean and bold, with no need for hashtags, social media icons or calls to action, it’s OOH creativity at its best.

Chaka Sobhani, chief creative officer, Leo Burnett

Politics can be a dry old world  –  that is, until election time, when the circus well and truly comes to town. Trump and Hillary squared up and we, the world, watched as the mad reality show of the US presidential election played out in front of our eyes. It was beyond a feast for the media as it was handed characters (or caricatures) like politics had never seen before.
Many brands jumped on the political bandwagon – how could they not? – when standing for something felt even more important somehow. Diesel delivered the beautiful and punchy “Make love not walls”, and I absolutely loved the elegance and power of AeroMexico’s’ “Borders” campaign. Pure class.
But the one that really stood out for me came from Der Tagesspiegel, a German daily paper. It’s not a regular publication for me, but it captured what I love so much about the powerful iconography that can be created in politically charged times when, in among the flurry of commentary and conversation, big, bold images can stand out above all the noise and come to define a moment in history.
In case you haven’t seen it, it’s OOH at its best – simple, bold and has a major impact.
The image of Trump on the front page, his mouth manipulated into a raging scream by shooting the pile of newspapers from above, is just bloody clever. No tricks or gimmicks in post-production needed – just
a smart idea, shot well, in-camera. It creates something original by taking the familiar and twisting it, and is made for the scale, impact and immediacy of OOH, where one powerful image can tell a story better than 1,000 words ever can.
We all remember Blair’s “Demon eyes” from the Conservatives’ “New Labour, new danger” campaign, and Obama’s “Hope”. They’re brilliant, but I love that this comes from a daily newspaper in Berlin. No fuss, no big budgets, just a great idea, simply executed and on a fast turnaround. Had it been the New York Times, I’m sure it would be more widely famous, and part of the visual lexicon of this now infamous moment in history. It deserves to be.
Ich liebe es.

Open Canvas
Via: Campaign Live

I don't want another human in my home: What to expect at DMEXCO 2017

 

It took me a little while to unpick the DMEXCO theme for this year, ‘Lightning the Age of Transformation’. Its nod to the constant evolution of new technology was what really caught my imagination.

We’ve seen this time and time again over the last year with technology quickly outpacing its predecessor and the rate of consumer adoption accelerating. TomTom, then Siri and now Alexa, they’ve all become not only our best friends but household names. Technology is changing our lives – and changing them at pace – and the question we are often left with is ‘how do we keep up?’

Often this conversation is framed with the word ‘humanising’. If we humanise brands, we should therefore humanise technology, right? But I don’t want another human in my home! And this is why…

Humanising brands implies a mutual benefit between brand and consumer, but if we humanise technology, how can it continue to evolve our capabilities if we’re simply replicating our current strengths? Technology benefits our lives as an enabler, but if we simply replicate human traits in technology, we’re not advancing our capabilities, we’re just replacing ourselves.

Much of the debate around whether machines will replace our jobs hinges on this: do we create machines to help with capabilities we don’t have, so we can work more efficiently, or do the machines take over? Especially if we invite these technologies into our homes and give them names… I’m calling the intruder alarm.

For me, the most exciting advancements that tech will bring are not benefits for brands to communicate with audiences, but the improvements in the processes to get there.

Therefore the thing I’m looking forward to seeing most out of DMEXCO is twofold: I can’t wait to hear ideas and see some tech that hasn’t only been developed to advance our marketing objectives or our way of life in a siloed way, but that takes both into consideration concurrently; I also can’t wait to see some new developments that benefit brands but, more than that, develop our abilities as strategic marketing professionals.

This article was written by Harriet Swinburn, Account Director for the Multiply Team at Posterscope.

Theodore Buscemi, from Posterscope Australia, explains why marketers shouldn’t look past OOH to control how their brand appears in market.

In this guest piece for B&T magazine, Posterscope Australia business executive Theodore Buscemi explains why marketers shouldn’t look past the out-of-home media channel to control how their brand appears in market.
The ad industry never fails to breed controversy. Like a hot summer sun and dry dead grass, it is just a spark away from a full-blown firestorm. Digital is stealing all the attention these days – everything from fat-fingers and ad fraud to flawed metrics and evil algorithms. Not to mention the proliferation of fake news, which has garnered widespread attention since the 2016 US presidential election cycle.  Meanwhile, giants like Facebook and Google suffered as a result of the recent online video debacles. These issues went beyond financial implications of misspent marketing dollars – brand image itself was the real victim. And when a brand entrusts Google with a portion of its marketing spend, it is Google’s responsibility to protect the brand image of the client.
Why is it so important for brands to consider where and how they are represented in market?
Read on

We asked 100,000 consumers worldwide…about OOH

Megin Gauntlett, Senior Insight Executive at Posterscope delves into our planning tool OCS, giving insight on how we understand our global audience and plan resonating campaigns.
OCS – The largest global OOH survey in the world
OCS (Out-of-Home Consumer Survey) is Posterscope’s proprietary planning tool and an integral part of Posterscope’s planning process across the globe. Since its launch in 2005, it has continued to expand and now encompasses over thirty markets and 100,000+ consumers worldwide.
OCS enables planners to efficiently and effectively identify the behaviours and attitudes of relevant consumers and translate these into actionable insights. These insights are then used to inform the most appropriate OOH plan.
The range of topics contained within OCS include, amongst others, the consumer journey to purchase, attitudes towards over 50 different types of OOH (including airport and experiential), and the claimed noticeability of these formats. As the opportunities within the OOH market evolve, so too does OCS – with questions such as ‘topics searched for on smartphones’ and ‘consumer opinion on relevant dynamic digital content’ being amongst those most recently added across all markets globally.
OCS identifies OOH nuances between markets
In practice, OCS allows us to identify key trends over multiple markets, and to understand the various idiosyncrasies and differences when it comes to consumer opinions and behaviours around the world. This can range from looking at day-to-day actions that we take for granted, such as how we commute to work, to more individually-determined actions, such as where we’re more likely to search online whilst out of the home. These differences help us to personalise planning for each audience across each market.
ocs by country
Universal trends in OOH – Location, Location, Location
OCS also allows us to identify key insights that are consistent worldwide, and in turn enable Posterscope to develop its OOH offering to meet these requirements. For example, the importance of context and relevance in OOH is now universally acknowledged, and, in recognition, Posterscope is rolling out its Liveposter product on a global basis. Liveposter offers a unique blend of context and relevance, as it serves engaging messages across multiple OOH locations using triggers such as time, day, and weather.
But which kind of messaging does the consumer really want to see? Based on the views of over 60,000 consumers from nine of Posterscope’s core OCS markets (the UK, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, Japan, Australia, the USA and Singapore), we can see a unanimous trend in the dynamic content that consumers engage with most when it comes to DOOH – Location. On average 60-70% of global consumers engage with contextual DOOH messages relating to the weather, time of day, day of week, seasonal events and live sports updates… but location is the dynamic content type most favoured across all 9 markets without exception. Almost 8 in 10 global consumers state that they are interested in location-based messages on DOOH.
ocs types of message
In the UK, location-based messages resonate even more with consumers, and this becomes even further pronounced amongst specific audiences. For instance, 90% of London fashion consumers (“Londoners who are passionate about shopping in store to buy fashion items”) are interested in location-based DOOH content. This type of insight helps to inform and plan successful OOH campaigns, such as Timberland’s recent campaign which ran across shopping malls and high streets in London. Based on the viewer’s location, suggestions were made to visit a local store or landmark, along with relevant statistics such as distance, number of steps required, and calories burned, whilst promoting the unique comfort of the new Sensorflex product.
timberland
Société Générale used a similar idea in rail stations and airports across France – letting consumers know how long until their train or plane departs and reminding them that they have plenty of time to log on to the app and complete a few transactions whilst in transit.
The success of this kind of location-based marketing is not to say that the consumer is uninterested in any other relevant messaging displayed on DOOH screens. As the chart above illustrates, global consumers are similarly interested in a variety of contextual messaging as detailed in OCS, and, in some cases, confounding national stereotypes such as the British being more inclined to care about the weather, when in fact they actually ranked 8% lower than the average of all countries evaluated!
Multiple Messages engage consumers
Combining multiple contextual messages, when relevant, helps to further engage the consumer. santander v2Across all markets, campaigns which feature multiple contextual messages are proven to have greater consumer impact – Santander Cycles being a casing example. Santander Cycles identified two key audiences for its product – leisure users and commuters, and, using the Liveposter platform, encouraged them to hire a cycle for their next journey. As well as using location and local nearby attractions as inspiration, the campaign also utilised time of day (when to deliver the ads) and weather data (letting people know if the weather is going to be good for a day outdoors). Research demonstrated that consumers who saw the DOOH Liveposter campaign were 20% more likely to spontaneously recall seeing advertising for Santander when asked “which, if any, high street banks or building societies have you seen, heard or read advertising for in the last 2 weeks?”  proving that contextually relevant DOOH content delivers strong advertising cut-through for brands.
Similar success has also been enjoyed by Fanduel, an online and app-based fantasy sports league based in the USA, who utilised relevant contextual messaging consisting of both time of day and location, in a drive to recruit more members and get them playing more games.
fandual
In summary, OCS helps us to understand the lives, opinions and OOH habits of more than 100,000 consumers in over 30 different markets. With the rapid development of DOOH inventory with real-time capabilities across the globe, OCS ensures that we can capture which tailored, contextual messages (and triggers) our audiences actually want to see and where, enabling us to deliver relevant real-time campaigns that truly resonate and drive results.

IPA Bellwether: Industry analysis

UK marketers have revised their internet budgets up to the greatest extent since the third quarter of 2007, according to the latest IPA Bellwether Report.
Glen Wilson, MD Posterscope UK, was one of the media experts to shares his thoughts with Mediatel on what the latest IPA Bellwether results mean for the industry.
“So the latest Bellwether report indicates that digital budgets are predicted to see the biggest rise for 10 years but set against a backdrop of prevailing economic headwinds and the lowest level of marketer optimism for four and a half years. There seems to be something of a dichotomy in this, and I think it is a further reflection of the pivot towards the shorter term, activation centred approach recently revealed by the IPA in its excellent report ‘Media in Focus – Marketing effectiveness in the digital era’.
The report highlights the ratio of brand to activation activity has flipped from the acknowledged optimum of 60/40 to almost the complete reverse. The analysis goes on to demonstrate that businesses that have taken the long view and invested in their brands, from a marketing perspective, have ultimately enjoyed superior growth.
So although the report gives positive indication that marketing budgets are set to rise, we would caution that the anticipated deployment of these budgets could perpetuate the problem rather than help to solve it”.
To read the full report click here
 

This is the new "Minority Report" by Alberto Garcia, Posterscope Iberia

This is the new “Minority Report”

Do you remember the Minority Report (Steven Spielberg) scene where Tom Cruise was strolling through a mall that ” sensed ” his presence and interacted with him offering personalized content? Today we are analyzing a future that is not so far away.
Thanks to technology we live in the era of “ubiquitous connectivity”, that is, the one in which we are connected with everyone and everything around us. And for this, or because of this, cities are transformed. This connectivity has made the momentum more relevant, and when we are away from home the moment is intrinsically related to location. This is the path of Out-of-Home (OOH) to Digital OOH, and finally to Location Based OOH.
Read More ….

 

Posterscope Netherlands host round table debate @ Digital Marketing Live 2017

Posterscope Netherlands host round table debate @ Digital Marketing Live 2017
On Thursday the first of June the sixth edition of Digital Marketing Live event took place. Dentsu Aegis Network Netherlands participated as content partner and organized two presentations and four round tables.
Together with Isobar colleague Melvin van Gom, Bas van den Hoogen, managing director Posterscope Netherlands hosted a roundtable in which they claimed that we as marketing and media professionals are closer to the consumer than we think. They showed how data gives us a range of insights that we can use to map the target audience’s customer journey. By telling a fictional story about a day in the life of a customer Bas and Melvin explained how OOH and mobile can enhance each other.
By giving participants a look in a day of a customer with multiple touchpoints they showed that we can follow and interact with the consumer everywhere. The story starts with a daily morning routine of a fictional person, followed by how he travels to work every day and ends with multiple possible scenario’s after a day of work. During the story the participants were asked their opinion about audience insights and interaction options. After every claim Bas and Melvin explained how OOH in combination with mobile advertising can be used effectively. Overall this round table focused on the desired effect that marketing and media professionals are getting aware of the fact that the OOH/mobile media mix creates an engagement uplift for their campaigns.