‘Stories in the Sky’ Use Kites to Promote Children Reading!

How do you motivate children to read books when they lack the motivation and most importantly, the resources? Instituto Pró-Livro in Brazil came up with a creative idea in order to approach children and stimulate them to read.

Inspired by the International Book Day on April 23, Pro-Book Institute, in partnership with Salles Chemistri, collaborated with well-known Brazilian authors, such as Ana Maria Machado, Benedito Ruy Barbosa, Pedro Bandeira and Ziraldo, in order to turn their stories into kites for the “Stories in the Sky” project.

kite21

Children from impoverished communities are not used to reading books, since most of them don’t have access to them at home. However, they all love flying kites, which inspired the Pro-Book Institute (IPL) to decorate 500 kites with popular stories.

Famous Brazilian writers, cartoonists, painters were more than happy to donate their works for this inspiring campaign that aimed to promote literature and expand the imagination of the younger generation. After all, reading allows imagination to fly and in this case, flying was also literal!

According to their idea, children will read the stories on the kites and then, they will take them to the sky, until the cord gets cut. When it cuts, the story reaches other children that are also introduced to the wonderful world of storytelling. Suddenly the skies of Morro Santa Marta in Rio De Janeiro were filled with 500 kites and children all over the area couldn’t stop smiling.

kites3

Alisson Patrick Cardoso Dias is a 12-year-old boy found the ‘Stories in the Sky’ project “very cool”, adding that: “I usually go to the library to look at books. If I think it looks good, I take it to read.” He was particularly interested in the kite with excerpts from The Nutty Boy. “I think this book might be cool, maybe I’ll read it.”

What’s more, Alicia Victoria, an 8-year-old girl, mentioned: “Generally, I only read the book that the school tells us to read. And I only pick up a book to read when I have nothing to do.”

In a city that counts over 1 million people living in impoverished communities, literature is not always the priority, which makes such initiatives from Instituto Pró-Livro even more important. Creativity that leads to smiling children is always welcome, isn’t it?

Video here:

[youtube width=”300px” height=”200px”]XDB6-_vHo9k[/youtube]

Via: Creative Guerrilla Marketing