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The Non-Violence Bus

In recent years violence in Mexico has increased considerably (drug trafficking, kidnapping etc.). The Non-Violence Project Foundation is a non-profit NGO that fights violence through education.
The idea was to build a bus; half prison-bus, half school bus with the message: “Violence ends when education begins”. With the help of kids and prisoners (actors), the bus was parked outside schools and drove around Mexico City interacting with the target audience.
Via: Ads of the World

Lego Bus Stop Made of 100,000 Bricks Marks London's Year of the Bus

A new bus stop made entirely out of Lego could put the fun back into the daily commute.
The model, which was built by toy store Hamley’s outside its Regent Street store with more than 100,000 bricks, is currently being used as a real stop for nine routes.
It was created to mark Transport for London (TfL) Year of the Bus, which celebrates 100 years since London buses were sent to the Western Front in WW1, as well as the 60th anniversary of the Routemaster.
A TfL spokesman said the Lego stop, which is due to be taken down on July 15, could be retained in the long-term if it is not “tampered” with.
Via: London Evening Standard

WaterAid Launches To be a Girl Appeal with Exterion Media

International development charity WaterAid has launched its To be a girl fundraising appeal by unveiling a series of shocking adverts on over 3000 buses throughout the UK, highlighting that for millions of girls living without access to safe water or somewhere to go to the toilet, life is no fairy tale. Working in partnership with Exterion Media, the bus campaign will be seen by an audience of 37 million people over the next two weeks.
The campaign highlights how life without access to clean water and toilets is tough for everybody, but the consequences of not having these basic services affect women and girls the most. They often spend hours each day collecting water and are left vulnerable to violence and sexual assault when going to the toilet in the open.
WaterAid are aiming to raise £1million through the appeal and the UK Government will match all donations from the UK public, helping to bring safe water and sanitation to over 130,000 girls around the world.
WaterAid is also inviting the public to answer what it means to them To be a girl through their interactive online hub www.tobeagirl.org, featuring stories from girls around the world, including Madagascar, India, Uganda, Nepal and Burkina Faso
A whole host of celebrities are lending their support for the To be a girl appeal, including Samantha Barks, Ellie Simmonds, Rachel Stevens, Laura Whitmore, Helen Lederer and Suzi Perry.
To find out more about WaterAid’s To be a girl appeal, go to www.tobeagirl.org or support the appeal by texting GIRLS to 70300 to donate £3 to WaterAid.
Via: Exterion Media

Posters at Bus Stops Collect Change so the Less Well-Off Can Get a Ride

Poverty is an issue that affects every city, where the most wealthy sections of society walk the same streets as the homeless. However, getting the former to give to latter is still a challenge. Schemes such as Suspended Coffees have helped consumers to donate a coffee to those that can’t afford one, and now Troco Coletivo — which translates as Payback Collective — is a new initiative in Brazil, which enables commuters to leave their small change at bus stops or on buses so the less wealthy can use it to travel.
Created by marketing agency Mark+, the campaign has placed bright yellow strips on bus stop posts and bus handrails that have several pockets. Text on the signs lets passengers know that if they have some change, they can leave it in the pouches, and that those who need some can take what’s there. The scheme requires an element of trust, but it’s hoped that the simple project will foster a sense of community spirit. The scheme helps both those who can’t afford to pay for a bus fare to travel, as well as those who find themselves short by a small amount. While it’s possible that some could take advantage, the creators believe that Troco Coletivo is a social experiment that has the potential to become a standard at bus stops across the country, or even the world.
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Via: springwise

Karen Millen Targets Fashionistas

Karen Millen currently have two very striking bus wraps running simultaneously in Paris and London. Following the success of their 2013 campaign which saw a sales uplift as a result of bus liveries, the brand have continued to invest in the format. Planned through Cream, Posterscope and PSI, the activity has targeted the London and Paris fashion week audiences and will continue to target routes in proximity to relevant art exhibitions such as the David Bailey Stardust exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery.

Boris Johnson declares 2014 to be the 'Year of the Bus'

Forget the Year of the Horse – London’s mayor, Boris Johnson, declared 2014 to be the “Year of the Bus” in the capital. A clear threat in the glamour stakes to Rio’s World Cup.
I don’t think he meant we’ll all be forced to wait, dead-eyed, for what feels like an eternity, before everything comes at once in a single, unforgiving traffic jam. No, I believe our favourite bumbling politician was nodding his Etonian floppy mop to the fact that the Routemaster celebrates its 60th anniversary in 2014.That our iconic hop-on, hop-offs (and try not to get trapped under the wheels, if you please) have been ferrying people around the streets of London for six decades is remarkable. It’s a little-known fact that, back when the first Routemaster pulled out of the depot, people in France were still learning to walk.The “pulsing red arteries of the capital” is how Johnson described them. Running 24 hours a day, 364 days a year, buses play an important, if understated, role in the city’s economy.
More than 2.3 billion bus journeys a year are made in London. And what better use of these ten-foot-high mobile red beasts than advertising? A far cry from the digital innovations we’re usually writing about, but bus ads continue to have a reach and frequency that make them a compelling part of the mix.
Towering creative and the ability to target specific areas with tailored messages are inherent in your double-decker. Bus ads can deliver messages into the heart of the community and get people talking (just ask Garry Lace).
By way of a reality check, last year, buses carried around £100 million-worth of ads – more than double that spent on Twitter. Film and entertainment brands have long known about the power of bus advertising, spending more than £35 million last year. Similarly, high-street retailers are drawn to its proximity to point of sale in both time and space, and find buses a true leader for driving impulse purchases (think food, drinks, magazines and clothes).
Far from downmarket, TGI data shows 65 per cent of ABC1s in the UK have seen bus ads in the past week, and this rises to 74 per cent in London. As anyone at the new Exterion Media (that’s CBS Outdoor to you) will remind you, buses present the opportunity to reach the most connected urban audience in the country.
Via: MediaWeek

Public buses lure riders with on-board augmented reality entertainment

To attract more people to take the bus, the public transit system in Aberdeen, Scotland placed augmented reality technology on the backs of the bus seats allowing passengers to view interactive videos when they scan the trigger with their smart devices. The on-board entertainment systems were first placed on First Aberdeen buses, which feature free Wi-Fi.
To stream the channel of interactive videos, passengers need to first download the free First Scotland augmented reality app from Google Play or the App Store and then scan the trigger with their smart devices.
The interactive video channel include videos containing interviews with staff, information about the services, movie trailers or schedules. Passengers can also buy movie tickets through the channel or just surf the internet.
Via: psfk