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Open Canvas: the best in outdoor (November 2017)

Two experts pick their favourite out of home campaigns and explain why their chosen work makes the most of the medium

Will Sharples, strategist, WCRS


Britain certainly isn’t the most welcoming place right now. A recent Ipsos MORI study reveals anti-immigration feeling as the main cause of the Brexit outcome. But it’s also a time when many people are looking for leadership to champion a more positive, progressive set of values. In a void of such leadership, brands have an opportunity to step up.
Making a political statement with clarity and authenticity is no easy task. That is why Jigsaw’s recent OOH takeover of Oxford Circus Tube station stands out. It’s immediate, relevant and left me a little happier about the world.
The posters are refreshingly direct. “♥ Immigration” is plastered in front of ethnically diverse models against quintessentially British rolling hills and heritage homes. The message is clear: immigration doesn’t threaten “British values’’. Then there’s its manifesto poster, which reads: “There’s no such thing as 100% British.”
Few media buys can give the impact an OOH takeover has at Oxford Circus Tube. The work covers the walls, surrounding you with Jigsaw’s bold statement. The location itself feels pertinent; it’s the epicentre of fast fashion, where many cookie-cutter retailers wouldn’t touch such an emotive subject with a bargepole.
Jigsaw had a modest budget; it needed to create a campaign that prompted a wider discussion. So it used OOH for what it’s best at – creating bold work that can stir a reaction among a small audience who want to share it. By presenting such an unequivocal message, so attuned to the current political conversation, the campaign did just that. “♥ Immigration” was picked up by loads of publications, podcasts and news outlets, and social media was buzzing with people’s responses to the campaign.
Jigsaw could have done some print ads featuring beautiful people in beautiful clothes. They would have looked nice and some people would have glanced at them. But instead, it has used what’s best about OOH: a chance to create something worth talking about, triggering a bigger conversation. A conversation that needs to happen.

Nina Taylor, creative director, OgilvyOne Worldwide

The truth is, I haven’t been to the toilet on my own for three years now. Not once.
He’s always there, watching me wee like a perverted furry voyeur. Sometimes he’ll even lick his crown jewels at the same time. He’s my feline shadow, and his name is Robin. I’ve always wondered: “Is this normal? Am I normal?”
The answer came to me this week in the shape of an 18ft tall ad of a woman sitting on the loo, as her cat stares up at her. And it declares confidently that I’m not mad. Because, apparently, “It’s not loopy, it’s love.”
This campaign for Lily’s Kitchen uses outdoor in the only way it should; by being super-bold, engaging and downright unmissable. Putting a picture of a woman on the loo is a brave move to sell cat food. Putting her 18ft tall is even braver. But empathy is where the genius lies in this campaign, and that’s what makes it work so well for outdoor. Any cat obsessive has been on this toilet.
The art direction is classic, while the photographic point of view is fresh and plays perfectly with the first-person copy perspective. This campaign knows that there are cat owners out there who will dish out more dough on cat food in a month than they will on new clothes. And one of those people is me. Do I get my cat to “talk” on the phone? Tick. Does my cat wake me at 4am to play? Tick. Do I never go to the loo on my own? Tick. Will I buy Lily’s Kitchen? Tick. Tick. Tick.
Simple and bold, this campaign succeeds where lots of others fail, because it knows who it’s talking to, makes them notice, hooks them in, and makes them smile. It’s a rare thing these days, but one that I’m sure eight out of 10 of us would agree makes the ad world a better place.

Open canvas russell insight

Via: CampaignLive

Open Canvas: the best in outdoor (October 2017)

Two experts pick their favourite out of home campaigns and explain why their chosen work makes the most of the medium

Nicky Bullard, chairwoman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite

The sound of a smartphone hitting the ground screen-side down is a shattering experience. That’s why O2’s latest “Oops” out of home campaign is literally a cracking use of the medium. Not only is it simple, it made me laugh out loud, which a poster hasn’t done for a very long time. It’s also unexpected: focusing on the “Oops” moment by using apparently broken, cracked-looking billboards makes people do a double take. Posters normally stand neatly on their sites. Yes, we sometimes see the paper peeling off but we rarely see a wonky one.
The idea works well for OOH because of the scale: a poster is an “instant” medium, and this example is pretty darn instant (and huge). I’ve seen other elements of the campaign (eg TV spots, Instagram stories, Snapchat lenses) and none has the impact of OOH. It has achieved in three seconds what the TV ad (for the same message) tried to do in 30. It’s just a shame there weren’t more sites used. I love that lots of people didn’t realise these broken billboards were deliberate, despite the copy explaining it was for O2’s new screen-replacement offer.
One Twitter user tweeted: “It definitely isn’t [deliberate]. You’d never get it past health and safety…” That’s the best response any OOH campaign can have, showing how OOH can bring a creative idea and the brand behind it into my everyday world. I can walk past it. Look up. Take a picture. Tweet it. See it in my routine every day for as long as the campaign runs. I want to see more ads like this, that truly interact with the observer in a clever, humorous and ambitious way. Why not? Creatives love a poster – there shouldn’t be a block.
Sometimes maybe the media is chosen before the idea has come to light. Writing for a poster is a wonderful challenge. Ideally, you have to distil your thinking into three words or fewer and create something that stops people in their tracks. It’s hugely exciting.

Matt Davis, executive creative director, Red Brick Road

Such is the nation’s insatiable appetite for Premier League football that the TV audience is surely low-hanging fruit for the two main players, Sky and BT Sport.
Armchair football fans can’t get enough of the unscripted drama – frenetic, competitive, partisan and fame-filled catnip. But now, entering its third year as the sole other broadcaster, the challenges for BT Sport have, it appears, shifted. It now needs to be synonymous with sport, which means being a stand-alone broadcaster, not just a football-content-providing arm of a telecoms behemoth – because its sports portfolio has been substantially enriched.
BT Sport’s own narrative for the football soap opera clearly needed to be a more nuanced, meaty affair. But in addition to the Premier League, it now broadcasts UEFA Champions League, The Ashes, Aviva Premiership Rugby and UFC. That’s quite a roster, and it has lined up stars from each discipline to front its campaign.
So has it risen to the challenge? Very much so. The successful but blunt messaging and arresting football-focused imagery of the past two years has moved up a gear. Numerous OOH executions all appear under the weighty and memorable, “Where the best go head to head”. Nice bit of metre, nod to the vernacular, and seven words. A solid, idea-infused line.
But the OOH really comes to life with the photography. It’s a simple, almost old-fashioned idea really: two stars from different sports, colliding on a pitch, a merging of their talents. Slick post-production means the eye sees the action take place seamlessly and naturally in one location. My favourite is Saracens lock Maro Itoje attempting a textbook tackle on the twinkle-toed footballer Eden Hazard. Who’ll succumb? Who knows?
That’s the most pulsating of the executions: BT Sport is where the best go head to head, and that’s all we need to know. Two other memorable executions feature Joe Root on the cricket pitch high-fiving Luis Suarez, and Wayne Rooney having been beaten at boxing by Nicola Adams – the ref is about to raise her arm and Wayne’s distraught.
What I really like is the split-second it takes to recognise people, meld the contrasting parts in your mind and create the image. This increases dwell time by a beat, making the OOH campaign cut through, big time.
Gill open canvas 3

Via: Campaign Live

Open canvas: the best in outdoor

Two experts pick their favourite out of home campaigns and explain why their chosen work makes the most of the medium

Anna Carpen, executive creative director, 18 Feet & Rising


Dear 3,749 people who streamed It’s the End of the World As We Know It the day of the Brexit vote, Hang in there.” This is one of my favourite headlines from Spotify’s OOH campaign “Thanks 2016, it’s been weird”.
It was a year that ran away with itself. There was nothing we could do to tame it. All we could do was wallow in the music. Spotify cleverly used streaming data to bring to life some insights into our music listening habits. It picked up on the truth that not only is music a reflection of life, but so are the songs we listen to and the names we give our playlists – a good gauge of public mood. Localise this data and you’re onto a winner.
Yes – data can be boring. It lumps people into categories they don’t belong in; its sweeping generalisations are infuriating. But the way the data is used for this campaign is different. This is all about pulling out our human quirks – talking about things that are relatable, rather than stereotypical. The more insights creatives have, the more witty, entertaining and effective their OOH work can be.
That’s the wonderful thing about this campaign: the freshness of the insights, and the fact that it landed slap-bang in the middle of whatever we were all going through at the time.
It would be really interesting to be even more reactive with this campaign in digital spaces.
In 2016 we bade farewell to so many musical talents – and within minutes of the news of their death breaking, those beloved stars were propelled to the top of the streaming charts. Imagine if Spotify created these funny, relatable headlines based on that day’s news? Or if you could know how many people in your town were listening to DJ Jazzy Jeff and The Fresh Prince’s Summertime on a blazing hot day?
The art direction is bright, vibrant and true to Spotify’s Swedish heritage. Clean and bold, with no need for hashtags, social media icons or calls to action, it’s OOH creativity at its best.

Chaka Sobhani, chief creative officer, Leo Burnett

Politics can be a dry old world  –  that is, until election time, when the circus well and truly comes to town. Trump and Hillary squared up and we, the world, watched as the mad reality show of the US presidential election played out in front of our eyes. It was beyond a feast for the media as it was handed characters (or caricatures) like politics had never seen before.
Many brands jumped on the political bandwagon – how could they not? – when standing for something felt even more important somehow. Diesel delivered the beautiful and punchy “Make love not walls”, and I absolutely loved the elegance and power of AeroMexico’s’ “Borders” campaign. Pure class.
But the one that really stood out for me came from Der Tagesspiegel, a German daily paper. It’s not a regular publication for me, but it captured what I love so much about the powerful iconography that can be created in politically charged times when, in among the flurry of commentary and conversation, big, bold images can stand out above all the noise and come to define a moment in history.
In case you haven’t seen it, it’s OOH at its best – simple, bold and has a major impact.
The image of Trump on the front page, his mouth manipulated into a raging scream by shooting the pile of newspapers from above, is just bloody clever. No tricks or gimmicks in post-production needed – just
a smart idea, shot well, in-camera. It creates something original by taking the familiar and twisting it, and is made for the scale, impact and immediacy of OOH, where one powerful image can tell a story better than 1,000 words ever can.
We all remember Blair’s “Demon eyes” from the Conservatives’ “New Labour, new danger” campaign, and Obama’s “Hope”. They’re brilliant, but I love that this comes from a daily newspaper in Berlin. No fuss, no big budgets, just a great idea, simply executed and on a fast turnaround. Had it been the New York Times, I’m sure it would be more widely famous, and part of the visual lexicon of this now infamous moment in history. It deserves to be.
Ich liebe es.

Open Canvas
Via: Campaign Live

Outdoor Plus wins The Hammersmith Towers

The Hammersmith Towers, one of London’s most prestigious double sided digital screens, has been won by Outdoor Plus.
A council spokesperson said “We selected Outdoor Plus following a competitive marketing process to be our partner on this landmark site moving forward.  We are looking forward to working with them and believe that their market leading position in London will generate significant additional revenue for our borough to reinvest in services for our residents.
The site, one of the UK’s best digital advertising opportunities, delivers OOH’s biggest audience on the affluent west London Gateway to the A4/M4 corridor.
Portrait in format, this dynamic site is exceptional, reaching over 6.9m people every 2 weeks, from prestigious AB audiences to posh shoppers, from UK travellers to the most influential women in the country.
It remains an iconic landmark location and is a valued addition to the already iconic Outdoor Plus London portfolio. Rich with creative opportunity, this location offers brands the ability to execute two creatives simultaneously, allowing greater scope to push the technological boundaries and create ultimate stand out.
Jonathan Lewis, Managing Director at Outdoor Plus, said: We remain committed to delivering the best sites in the best locations in the best city in the world.  As part of that commitment we will be replacing the screens with new state of the art technology before the end of 2017. We are delighted to welcome this new addition to our ever growing London portfolio. Another unmissable moment from Outdoor Plus for audiences on the move

Visa adds first hotel wifi sponsorship to OOH campaign targeting Chinese tourists

PSI, Posterscope’s international division, has signed its first hotel wifi sponsorship deal, for Visa China, as part of a wider out-of-home (OOH) campaign promoting its China Merchants Bank card to Chinese tourists as they arrive, travel to and stay in London.
The sponsorship, delivered in partnership with Luxia Global and Starcom UK, incorporates sponsorship of guest wifi services in 68 four and five star hotels across London throughout July. Users will be identified through browser language, served messaging in Chinese, and later retargeted with digital ads on relevant tourist and shopping websites.
RoccoForte Brown's Hotel Smartphone
The sponsorship completes a campaign appearing along the Heathrow to London “travel corridor” featuring digital OOH sites throughout Heathrow’s T5 terminal, lamppost banners across Central London and in shopping hotspots, plus a wrap of a Central London tourist bus.
James McEwan, deputy MD, at PSI said: “We are delighted to have been able to secure this sponsorship opportunity and add a targeted element to Visa’s wider campaign for its China Merchant Bank card. By supporting the provision of wifi in key hotels frequented by Chinese visitors to London, we are able to put the brand directly into the hands of the target audience at a time when they are relaxing and open to receiving brand messages.”
A spokesperson for Starcom UK, added: “The sponsorship of guest wifi is an exciting addition to our campaign for the China Merchant Bank card. The ability to reach these travellers in their own language as they arrive in London, and be associated with such a highly valued service as guest wifi is a great manifestation of Visa’s brand desire to be ‘everywhere you want to be’.”

Why in the future all advertising will be experienced

Emerging tech is causing advertising to become increasingly multi-sensory and fully immersive as it moves off screen. Michael Brown, Managing Director of MKTG discusses with Campaign Magazine.

Technophiles the world over are looking forward to a day when all forms of content are freed from its present confinement within the four edges of a screen; to be fully multi-sensory, 360-immersive, and at some point beyond the far off horizon, indistinguishable from the real world. The message will not be contained by the medium.

How far are we from such a horizon, and are we sprinting or strolling there are questions that a lot of clever people in white lab coats are posing.

VR may take us a few tantalising strides closer. Some will groan heavily at yet another mention of this particular tech, but if we move our focus away from the headsets and instead look at how the content can be deployed and enjoyed, then interesting signposts emerge.

Earlier this year I was at the launch of the Allianz-sponsored Drone Racing League. A world championship heat will be taking place in the capital as part of London Tech Week this June. Sky were also present to announce their ownership of the broadcast rights. They intend to show the proceedings from an entirely different perspective; those with a heavy dispensation towards all things geek will already know that drone racers pilot their craft through goggles linked to a Go-Pro camera mounted on the drone. This means that home viewers with a Sky package and VR headsets can get closer into the action in an immersive sense – a pilot’s eye view.

Can’t get a ticket to the Champions League Final? Experience it at home through the headsets from multiple immersive perspectives; as a player, the referee, from the dug out, in the crowd.

Home viewing of sports is set to become a little less passive. It should also open up new channels for a broadcaster to sell to individual brands. A brand taking a behind the scenes approach may wish to sponsor the home dug-out experience for instance. Another, wishing to build on their brand ambassador program may look to extend their sponsorship rights to create an immersive viewing experience using the footage from a micro camera mounted on their player.

Such a way of viewing sport would be very intriguing technologically as you could mix live footage with VR as an exclusive to the home viewer: One could easily imagine Antonio Conte virtually tapping you on the shoulder during a live broadcast telling you to get your boots on.

Meanwhile, there are tech companies who have taken an active dislike to those clunky goggles. Globally there are circa 200 companies developing goggles-free VR to achieve a more inclusive, mass participatory approach.

Dassault Systèmes has long been a pioneer in 3D experience. At its Paris HQ, the Cubic Immersion Room offers an experience where every surface, including the floor, is a screen. The technology, known in the business as a “Cave” (Cave Automatic Virtual Environment), required that users wore a headset featuring several antennae which calibrated the graphic render on the screens with every movement around the room to more accurately create the illusion of perspective. When I visited, I was able to walk, with several other colleagues, around an unfolding render of Paris, stroll up any boulevard, go into any building, take the stairs or lift and walk into any room – the experience fell just short of being able to order a croissant.

Fast-forward to the present day, and the French giant has been doing interesting integrations with VR headsets and Immersion Rooms. This includes advancements that are far superior to commercially available VR such as the ability to see your own body. Users can recognise and interact with other people also wearing the headsets in the Cave. Not in an atavistic sense either; you can meet a colleague in the room and recognize that it is your colleague and not a graphic construct.

The practical application of this technology is being used in a myriad ways; an architect through to a product designer can construct, test and more importantly collaborate and discuss their grand vision with their colleagues in the Cave before a single foundation stone is laid, or a patent applied for.

This is all very well for the present day, but there is an emerging technology whose potential has had VC investors and technology gurus foaming with enthusiasm: Lightvert’s Echo technology is a light-triggered illusion capable of creating large scale graphics, seemingly in empty space. The images exist only in the user’s eye and not in reality.
The roll out of Echo displays is not limited by user uptake of wearable and mobile tech, or in fact the current planning laws and policies that currently govern Lightvert’s primary target customer; the out-of-home advertising industry.

Chief executive Daniel Sidden believes the world is now ready for Echo, citing that emerging mobile tech will enable interaction with the digital realm on a more natural and fluent level.

Sidden argues that: “Visual and audio based mixed reality technologies, such as HoloLens and Google’s new audio assistant technology will become ubiquitous and the opportunities for digital OOH in this area alone are clearly phenomenal.”

As this technology becomes yet more sophisticated, we should begin to see exciting developments for advertising. Technically any surface, or gesture, or motion sensor could be used to trigger content while people are out and about in the built environment or any open space.

That content might be an evolution of Echo’s static graphic renders into moving imagery, and from there, a further evolution into 360-immersive micro experiences. Sidden is unequivocal about the ability of content to break out from its present day limitations. “Media that was once previously confined to screens will be integrated into our every day actions and be capable of working with us and for us at all times, eliminating the barrier between physical and digital engagement.”

There you have it folks: the day is not far off when all advertising will be experienced.

Via: Campaign Live 

VisitScotland and United Airlines collaborate on campaign via Posterscope

VisitScotland is promoting United Airlines daily non-stop flight to Edinburgh from Newark with a dynamic campaign designed to reach potential travelers in the right mindset at the right time.
Developed with agency Posterscope USA, the campaign uses Liveposter, Posterscope’s dynamic creative platform, to trigger one of 32 unique and specific creative messages across Penn Station’s Link NYC screens.
For example, morning commute imagery suggests Fridays is a ‘pay day.’ Lunchtime will present images of some of the local cuisine and, when the temperatures dip, the screens automatically serve up a glass of Scotch. Sundown in Manhattan triggers picturesque views of the Highland’s Northern Light’s and Edinburgh castle illuminates.
A separate campaign is designed to drive urgency on the route to the airport via two digital billboards on highways that lead into Newark Airport and display live countdowns to the next flight to Edinburgh on United Airlines.

This project also pivots to real-time messaging and weather/event triggers as opposed to static banners.
“Understanding the mind-set of our audiences in real-time is the cornerstone of our strategic thinking,” said David Gladding, associate director, digital creative, Posterscope USA. “We know that one-third of Americans search for ‘last minute getaways’ within three days before the date of travel, so this campaign digs into that experience-hungry, escapism mind-set and uses data to tell us when and where messages conveying Scotland’s beauty, appeal and romanticism would be most memorable and impactful.”
VisitScotland collaborates with numerous partners and shops to encourage tourists. For instance, VisitScotland worked with 22 airlines in 2015 and 2016, including a new Delta service from JFK to Edinburgh. Social media has been another key focus in order to directly engage with potential tourists.
Followers of VisitScotland’s Facebook account have increased 157% to 661,000 since April 2014. The organizations other social media accounts have grown sharply as well.
Via: Media Post
 

Posterscope round table discusses: How do we solve a problem like creativity?

Group photo  (back row, l-r) Gideon Spanier, head of media, Campaign; Stephen Whyte, CEO, Posterscope UK; Julian Linley, multimedia consultant; Barnaby Dawe, global chief marketing officer, Just Eat; Claire Beale, global editor-in-chief, Campaign; Helen Weisinger, chief client officer, Outdoor Plus; Glen Wilson, managing director, Posterscope UK; (front row, l-r) Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer, Ogilvy & Mather Group UK; Nicky Bullard, chairman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite; Rick Hirst, CEO, Carat UK; Justin Tindall, group chief creative officer, M&C Saatchi; Sir John Hegarty, founder, Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage; Robert Campbell, creative entrepreneur and founder of Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R; Katie Dulake, head of brand and marketing, TSB Bank

Marketers, creatives and media owners were invited by Posterscope to discuss out-of-home creativity. Campaign’s Stuart Derrick listened in.

You don’t have to press advertising folk or marketers too hard to come up with their favourite poster campaign. Whether it’s The Economist’s clever copy, British Airways’ “#lookup”, numerous eye-catching Nike ads, Araldite’s iconic stuck-on car poster, or any number of mood-shifting political campaigns, out-of-home packs a memorable punch.

Gideon Spanier, Campaign‘s head of media, who chaired the debate on the state of creativity in OOH, kicked off the conversation with the recognition that, while the £1bn sector is in rude health, with revenue up for the eighth year in a row, there remains a concern that not all marketers and creative agencies are still inspired to create engaging OOH creative.

Posterscope CEO Stephen Whyte said: “OOH has a long history of strong, impactful creative and, today, brands such as Apple are using it to great effect, but lately this has tended to be an exception rather than the norm.”

He asked what the challenge is for creative teams, and why they are not excited about the creative opportunity in OOH. “As an industry, we need to do more to champion the creative strengths of the medium. Seeing more powerful, engaging OOH will be the best way to motivate both agencies and clients to want and demand the best work for their brands.”

And creatives themselves still love OOH. Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer of Ogilvy & Mather Group UK, said: “When I trained, distilling the campaign message to four words on a 48-sheet was considered the skill of advertising. It’s what got me into the industry.”

With many evolving formats, the medium may have lost its essence by trying to be all things, according to Justin Tindall, group chief creative officer of M&C Saatchi. “It’s become a generalist in a world obsessed with specialists,” he added.
Barnaby Dawe, global chief marketing officer of Just Eat, appreciates the traditional marketing mix and the extreme measurability of pay-per-click in equal measure. OOH is one of his brand’s key advertising channels.

“The climate in which we operate, where the CEO and CFO want to see ROI, means that PPC becomes an unhealthy addiction, with its ability to demonstrate instant effectiveness,” he said. “Outdoor is up against both traditional broadcast media and also new media, such as carousel and canvas ads on Facebook. As a generalist marketer, I’m keen to show how effective a combination of both performance and outdoor media can be.”

Creative solutions
Creative legend Sir John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage, said the challenge faced by OOH is also manifest in the wider ad industry.

“A generation of marketing directors are failing to understand how to build powerful brands – they confuse persuasion and promotion,” he argued. “Focusing on just short-term promotional messages. They’ve lost faith in long-term brand building. Maybe it’s too difficult for them?”

In this environment, there has been a loss of bravery in committing to a medium that doesn’t have the rack of analytics of digital. “For clients who are driven by, and rewarded for, an almost instantaneous focus on results, it can be difficult to keep posters on the plan,” Rick Hirst, CEO of Carat UK, said.
Katie Dulake, head of brand and marketing at TSB Bank, added that OOH can play a different role. For a challenger brand, it provides reach. “Our brand purpose is bringing local banking back to the UK. It’s all about where people live and work, so OOH is great for that. It also supplements our physical brand presence – our branches – on the high street,” she said.

However, there was a feeling around the table that creative agencies don’t design for the medium. “A 48-sheet brief could have been career defining at one time,” said Claire Beale, global editor in chief of Campaign, who pondered whether creative directors still fought over them.

“We used to go out and look at poster sites to get an idea of context and where the message would be,” Robert Campbell, creative entrepreneur and co-founder of Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R, said. “People do not give it that time any more.”

Helen Weisinger, who recently joined Outdoor Plus as chief client officer from a creative agency background, said there was a knowledge gap in the market and education was the key. “Creative and measurement are the two areas where people don’t know what OOH can do yet,” she contended.

De la Fosse suggested specialist OOH media agencies and media owners should increasingly work with creative agencies to stimulate creatives and push boundaries, as was the case with Ogilvy & Mather’s “#lookup” campaign for British Airways.

Glen Wilson, managing director of Posterscope UK, suggested the industry might be lacking bravery, and that incentivising creativity either through reviewing the creative awards programmes for OOH or reducing the cost of inventory based on creative excellence might be the way forward.

Hegarty advised agencies to get back to basic principles and an understanding of how value is built.

“Technology enables opportunity, creativity creates value,” he said. “So, as posters increasingly become a digital offering, [they provide] creative opportunity and cultural importance. They should also embrace wall painting. Call it Craft Advertising. Think how famous Banksy became from his wall art.”

The consensus was that, rather than focus on what posters can and can’t do, there is a need to focus on deliverables and objectives – to get back to what OOH does best and change the conversation to highlight that this is a medium where creativity can flourish.

[youtube width=”300px” height=”200px”]1EHoqCOrRLM[/youtube]

“Apple’s ‘Shot on iPhone’ is one of the best poster campaigns of the last three years. I don’t care how many pixels the camera has. If it takes pictures like that, I want it”

– Sir John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage

 

“If you can’t tell the story on a poster, it’s not a story worth telling”

– Nicky Bullard, chairman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite

 

“Data and technology present a great opportunity for DOOH but we shouldn’t ignore the scale, creative opportunity and fame-building strength the medium provides”

– Stephen Whyte, CEO, Posterscope

 “There’s pushback against clickbait to focus on quality content that speaks directly to an audience. It’s hard to gain attention through the noise online, but posters can cut through by virtue of being more environmental”

– Julian Linley, multimedia consultant

The full article on Campaign Live can be read here

Clear Channel Outdoor Planning Awards Announce Shortlist

Posterscope is delighted to be shortlisted for eight awards at this year’s Clear Channel’s Outdoor Planning Awards.  The shortlist which was announced today (22 Mar 2016) was agreed by a distinguished group of judges including Pat Doherty Founder; Creative Counsel, Dave Cox
Chief Innovation Officer; M&C Saatchi, Natasha Murray; Managing Director at Havas Media, Camilla Harrison; CEO and Partner at Anomaly, Verica Djurdjevic; Managing Director at PHD, Sue Unerman;
Chief Strategy Officer at Mediacom, Peter Taylor; UK Managing Director at Sony Pictures, Chris Pelekanou; Commercial Director at Clear Channel UK and was chaired by  Claire Beale (Global Editor-in-Chief, Campaign). The winners from each category will be announced at our awards ceremony on the 5th May 2016, at The St. Pancras Renaissance Hotel.
 
Best use of digital
This category rewards the effective use of data and insight, and how it can be interpreted to produce ground-breaking campaign ideas.
Santander, Summer of Cycles – Posterscope/Carat/Liveposter
Vodafone, 4G – Kinetic/MEC
Carlsberg, Beer Body Ready – Talon/OMD/Fold7
 
Best use of data and insight
Rewarding campaigns which demonstrate the best use of digital in Out of Home.  Digital platforms or technology, including mobile, should be central to the success of the campaign.
Smart Energy GB, Smart Meter – Talon/PHD
Bethesda, Fall Out 4 – Posterscope/Target Media/Locomizer
Pernod Ricard, Jameson F16 – Posterscope/Havas
 
Best use of multi-media
This category rewards the most outstanding integrated and multi-platform campaign that uses significant Out of Home advertising and at least one other media platform.
Dixons, Curry’s PC World Spare the Act – Posterscope/Blue449/Liveposter
Mondelez International, Oreo Eclipse – Talon/PHD/Grand Visual
 
Best use of multiple formats
Campaigns are rewarded which successfully utilise two or more distinct formats as part of an Out of Home-only campaign or within a wider multi-media initiative that has a substantial Out of Home element.
Propercorn, Dress London – Talon/M2M
Channel 4, Hunted – Talon/OMD/4Creative
Microsoft, Surface Pro 4 – Posterscope/Empower Media/M:United McCann
Telefonica, O2 Priority Moments – Posterscope/Forward Media/VCCP/Liveposter
 
Best use of continuity and long-term brand-building
Planners who have used Out of Home as part of their strategy over the long-term are recognised.
Historical Royal Palaces – Talon/M2M
Google, Old Street – Talon/OMD/R/GA London
Camelot, Always on OOH – Posterscope/Vizeum/Liveposter
 
Best use of innovation
This category rewards the application of innovative and creative thinking to a campaign.
Cancer Research UK, Tap to Beat Cancer – Kinetic/Mediacom
Bahio, Ai – Artificial Intelligence – Posterscope/M&C Saatchi/Clear Channel
Women’s Aid, Look at Me – WCRS

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