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Irish Design 2015 Highlights Design in Everyday Life

Design is everywhere but we don’t always see it. The Vitrine Project was devised by creative agency In the Company of Huskies in collaboration with Irish Design 2015 (a major yearlong initiative celebrating design) to help the public to become more aware of the prominence of design in everyday life.
On the 20th of November 2015, glass display cases, akin to those found in a museum, were placed around everyday items and street furniture in Dublin city centre locations, encouraging the public to re-examine what design means.

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Via: Best ads on TV

Clarks and Partners Andrews Aldridge Come Out on Top in Big Bus Challenge

Clarks’ in-house design group and Partners Andrews Aldridge have won top prizes in the Big Bus Challenge 2014 run by Exterion Media, in association with Campaign.
The footwear retailer’s bus ad triumphed over other national campaigns while Partners Andrews Aldridge’s work for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution’s patrolling of the Thames emerged victorious in the regional category. Cogent Elliott picked up a media commendation for a campaign of simple line drawings for Samaritans.
Clarks and the RNLI were awarded £200,000 of national and £25,000 of regional bus advertising respectively and each of the creative teams given £2,000 of department store vouchers to share. Samaritans was handed £20,000 of media space.
The winning entries to the second Big Bus Challenge were chosen by a panel of judges and revealed at The London Transport Museum  last night where guests were able to view showcased work.
Clarks’ ad stood out for its “elegance, simplicity and having the courage to keep the design so minimal,” said Paul Domenet, the executive creative director of Johnny Fearless and a Big Bus Challenge judge.
PAA’s EastEnders-inspired ad for the RNLI was praised as a “sound concept” by Andy Hunns, the creative director at Clinic and the Publicis executive director Andy Bird described Cogent Elliott’s Samaritans campaign as “brilliant, clever”, with “massive standout”.
Four other national finalists were chosen: Cogent Elliott for WD-40; Rapp for the Open University; Lida for Foyles and Proximity London for The Economist. In the regional category, there were three finalists: Publicis Life Brands Resolute for The Passage charity; Rapp for Virgin Media and Bray Leino for Bath Spa University.
The judging panel, chaired by Philip Smith, head of content solutions and studio at Campaign, consisted of: Martin Hancock, development director, National Express Bus; Gill Huber, group communications director, Posterscope; Chris Marjoram, managing director, Rapport; Richard Jacobs, marketing director, Kinetic; Ross Neil, executive creative director, WCRS; Jason Cotterrell, managing director UK, Exterion Media and Simon Harrington, marketing director, Exterion Media, along with Domenet, Hunns and Bird.
Via: Campaign

The ‘Biggest Design Poster Ever Made’ is 3-Dimensional and Interactive

Stockholm-based creative agency SNASK has created a fantastic poster for the Malmö Festival 2014—it is made up of gigantic, brightly colored, three-dimensional letters, numbers and shapes.
Instead of existing just in print and on screens, this eye-catching poster takes up an entire physical area—put together by hand, this epic design took “900 hours, 14 people, 175 liters of paint, 280 plywood boards and 10,000 nails” to complete.
In addition to appearing on the festival poster, this delightful creation will be installed at the Central Park in Malmö, where visitors will be able to climb, sit on and take pictures with the “biggest design poster ever made”.
To photograph this poster, one would have to do so from a crane, 30 meters up in the air.
Via: Design Taxi

An Interactive Museum Ad That Can Be Scratched Off By Commuters

To help promote their latest exhibition, The Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago came up with a brilliant interactive advertisement that can be scratched off by commuters.
Placed at bus shelters, commuters were invited to play archaeologists by unearthing the artworks hidden beneath the ads.
Via: Design Taxi