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The World’s First Streets Named After Street Kids for Door Step School

As you can imagine, it’s not easy being a kid in the slums of Mumbai. Life is tough, parents often work day and night but barely make enough to put food on the table. On the other hand, the goons and slum lords seem to have all the time, money and respect a child could want. Unfortunately, without other role models, the criminals are who the children begin to look up to and school falls by the wayside. FCB Interface and Door Step School sought to give these impressionable kids new role models, and while doing so, get them to believe in education and making a better future for themselves. Streets in India are named after famous people but the slums of Mumbai are a maze of hundreds of narrow, crisscrossing streets, many without names. The campaign named streets in Mumbai’s Ambedkar Nagar slum, home of more than 2.4 million people, after the best academic performers in school. The children were celebrated in a road naming ceremony with the community and celebrities in attendance.
Video below:
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Via: Best Ads on TV

‘Stories in the Sky’ Use Kites to Promote Children Reading!

How do you motivate children to read books when they lack the motivation and most importantly, the resources? Instituto Pró-Livro in Brazil came up with a creative idea in order to approach children and stimulate them to read.

Inspired by the International Book Day on April 23, Pro-Book Institute, in partnership with Salles Chemistri, collaborated with well-known Brazilian authors, such as Ana Maria Machado, Benedito Ruy Barbosa, Pedro Bandeira and Ziraldo, in order to turn their stories into kites for the “Stories in the Sky” project.

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Children from impoverished communities are not used to reading books, since most of them don’t have access to them at home. However, they all love flying kites, which inspired the Pro-Book Institute (IPL) to decorate 500 kites with popular stories.

Famous Brazilian writers, cartoonists, painters were more than happy to donate their works for this inspiring campaign that aimed to promote literature and expand the imagination of the younger generation. After all, reading allows imagination to fly and in this case, flying was also literal!

According to their idea, children will read the stories on the kites and then, they will take them to the sky, until the cord gets cut. When it cuts, the story reaches other children that are also introduced to the wonderful world of storytelling. Suddenly the skies of Morro Santa Marta in Rio De Janeiro were filled with 500 kites and children all over the area couldn’t stop smiling.

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Alisson Patrick Cardoso Dias is a 12-year-old boy found the ‘Stories in the Sky’ project “very cool”, adding that: “I usually go to the library to look at books. If I think it looks good, I take it to read.” He was particularly interested in the kite with excerpts from The Nutty Boy. “I think this book might be cool, maybe I’ll read it.”

What’s more, Alicia Victoria, an 8-year-old girl, mentioned: “Generally, I only read the book that the school tells us to read. And I only pick up a book to read when I have nothing to do.”

In a city that counts over 1 million people living in impoverished communities, literature is not always the priority, which makes such initiatives from Instituto Pró-Livro even more important. Creativity that leads to smiling children is always welcome, isn’t it?

Video here:

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Via: Creative Guerrilla Marketing

The Non-Violence Bus

In recent years violence in Mexico has increased considerably (drug trafficking, kidnapping etc.). The Non-Violence Project Foundation is a non-profit NGO that fights violence through education.
The idea was to build a bus; half prison-bus, half school bus with the message: “Violence ends when education begins”. With the help of kids and prisoners (actors), the bus was parked outside schools and drove around Mexico City interacting with the target audience.
Via: Ads of the World

This Billboard Cleans the Air!

Peru is in the middle of a construction boom that generates a lot of unhealthy pollution. Peruvian engineering university UTEC and its ad agency, FCB Mayo, decided to create an air-purifying billboard designed to mitigate the environmental damage the school causes as it builds a new campus.
The billboard has the added advantage of promoting the new campus, boosted by the claim that the school will help students learn how to do things like create billboards that filter about 100,000 cubic meters of clean air a day, reaching as far as five blocks away and equivalent to what some 1,200 trees would do.
The environmentally friendly campaign is part of a tried-and-true strategy for UTEC and FCB Mayo. Last year they famously created a billboard that helped address a rainfall shortage in Lima by converting atmospheric humidity into clean drinking water.
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Via: AdWeek