Posts

Havas's Paul Frampton on the Impact of Programmatic Advertising on the OOH Sector

Havas Media chief executive Paul Frampton offers his own views on the impact that the rise of programmatic advertising can have on the out of home (OOH) sector.
Much of the talk in the world of programmatic trading is around the inevitable expansion beyond digital into other media such as TV, radio and OOH. The latter is particularly interesting as digital inventory already accounts for almost 25 per cent of OOH ad spend and this will probably double within three years.
But ‘programmatic’ is probably at best a misleading term, given its very specific digital heritage, and at worst a misnomer. With OOH being fundamentally a broadcast medium with a ‘mass’ audience much of the value is not instantaneous and cannot be absolutely personalised to an individual. And of course performance is not driven by clicks on ads, but it is probably the best shorthand available for what is a hugely exciting future opportunity in OOH.
 So what will the OOH ‘programmatic’ future look like?
Well firstly it will not be a case of attempting to replicate the online programmatic model. Instead selected aspects of online will be translated into the closest equivalents for the physical world.
Secondly any form of programmatic OOH will need to add value to advertisers allowing them to access and optimise the medium in ways that have been historically prohibitive to achieve at scale.
So it will allow existing advertisers to minimise wastage, to target better (overall and by creative message), and to change copy more dynamically.  It will allow new advertisers to enter the medium at lower cost, with less risk, and with more demonstrable results to bring them back again and again.
Value will be added through:
Automated real time buying will give advertisers maximum agility and the application of new, often real time data to complement Route. Havas and Posterscope have already been utilising mobile data from EE for clients such as Nationwide and Emirates, and we will become increasingly reliant on such multi-source data when creating value through programmatic OOH deployment.
Audience based trading  bringing OOH in line with other media (OOH is still traded on an anachronistic cost per panel basis).
Dynamic, often data driven content as exemplified by Eurostar’s Outdoor Planning Award Grand Prix winning campaign from our sister agency, Arena, and our own Low Cost Holidays activity.
Site and creative optimisation throughout the lifecycle of an OOH campaign. Key to this is the real-time analysis of how OOH activity is influencing mobile internet behaviours.
All of this also provides the basis for an auction mechanic where demand can be the driver of price – media owners may be wary of this, but we believe it is inevitable, and that a collaborative approach can find a solution that benefits all.
Consequently I believe that there will be some splintering of the OOH market that separates the above approaches to those that are primarily about driving traditional brand metrics whereby OOH is bought in a more upfront or continuous manner.
Clearly the availability and application of data becomes more important as OOH becomes somewhat programmatic and the winners will be agencies that are best equipped in this respect. Agencies need to exploit datasets arising from 3g, 4G and wi-fi usage, traffic, environmental sensors, social, e/m-commerce, wearable tech…the list goes on and much of the success will be linked to the extent to which agencies engage their in-house resources in the planning of OOH.
With the dynamic creative opportunity referenced earlier, agencies ability to better connect media and creative become imperative and I believe that a long term commitment is needed to achieve this for our clients.
Whilst some of the emerging automation models for OOH are to be applauded, this really isn’t what I see the future as – there is no real-time buying, there is no dynamic targeting, and the ability to serve different creative messages in an ‘adserving’ manner is something that exists already.
I believe the programmatic future for OOH as a much bigger and more exciting opportunity.
There is an enormous advantage to be gained by bringing aspects of programmatic technology and thinking to the OOH medium and that ‘acting in real time’ is the key, helping advertisers obtain maximum value and effectiveness.  This will bring a distinct and game-changing edge to OOH planning and deployment.
Via: The Drum

Tapping in to better insights from big data

James Davies, CSO Posterscope,  appeared in EE feature  ‘Tapping in to better insights from big data’ in the Daily Telegraph Business section.  Davies discussed how Posterscope and EE are using mobile data for location-based OOH advertising.  The article, written by Chris Price, can be read below or accessed online.
” Why Surbiton station is a massive fashion hotspot” 

It may not be a name you are familiar with, but chances are that you will have seen one of Posterscope’s ads on your way to work this morning.
Bus stops, tube stations, even petrol pumps and shopping trolleys are just some of the locations where Posterscope buys advertising space on behalf of its clients, which include ZenithOptimedia, and brands such as KFC and Coca-Cola.
The company was behind the recent campaign to turn the iconic red London bus black, on behalf of Adidas. “It’s one of the few times where you can be walking down the street and you will overhear someone saying ‘look at that bus’,” says James Davies, Posterscope’s chief strategy officer.
The company claims to have around a 30pc share of the out-of-home (OOH) advertising market. With such a vast selection of OOH places to advertise, a large part of Posterscope’s job is to provide intelligence to clients.
“As a client you need specialist businesses to guide you because there are so many options,” explains Mr Davies. “Should I be on petrol pump nozzles or on the side of a bus? Once you’ve decided on the medium, you need to pick the location because with thousands of bus stops out there, you’re not going to choose all of them.”
Traditionally, when planning campaigns Posterscope has relied on proprietary research and industry level data to give some demographic information about a poster site. However, it has now gone one step further and added a “third level” — that of mobile data (mData) in partnership with EE.
Here insights based on anonymised and aggregated mobile network usage data is shared by EE to Posterscope to provide more accurate locationbased information for planning advertising campaigns on behalf of a client.
“mData allows you to go one step further than demographics so you can tell what groups of people are actually doing on their phones at a particular location,” says Mr Davies.
In a recent campaign for computer/tablet manufacturer Lenovo, for example, Posterscope was able to select sites where it knew people were more likely to be looking at technology websites. “As a result, people’s awareness of the campaign was twice as high in these hotspots,” says Mr Davies.
Since it started the mData partnership with EE last October, Posterscope has also used mobile research to uncover a few surprises. Says Mr Davies: “We were looking at places to advertise for one fashion client and were researching where people were looking at ASOS and Very’s websites on their mobile. We discovered that Surbiton station is a massive fashion hotspot.”
 
Source: The Daily Telegraph 

Posterscope Shortlisted for Data Innovation at Media Week Awards

The shortlist for October’s Media Week Awards 2014 has now be revealed, and following more competition and entries than ever before, all the companies to have made the cut have reason to celebrate.
The online judging process involved more than 100 judges –  view here http://www.mediaweekawards.co.uk/judges.
Arif Durrani, editor of Media Week, said: “Due to an unprecedented number of entries, the first round of this year’s Media Week Awards judging process has been brutal. Nearly half of those who entered did not progress through to the next round, so many congratulations to everyone who did make it on to shortlists this year.
“I do feel for those of you left feeling cheated. I hope there is some solace in knowing we’ve never had a year where the competition has been so fierce. The standard of entries has also notably moved on, with the most succinct and persuasive entries becoming something like art forms in themselves.”
The co-chairs of this year’s awards are Claudine Collins, managing director of MediaCom, and Bruce Daisley, managing director of Twitter UK.
The Media Week Awards 2014 will be held on 23 October at the Grosvenor House. 
Data Innovation
Big Data Partnership – Posterscope and EE
Posterscope
Via: Media Week 

EE to Offer Contactless Mobile Payments for London Travel

EE customers will be able to travel on London’s Underground, DLR and Overground networks using their mobile phones when TfL’s contactless program launches on 16 September.
EE is to become the only UK network provider to offer a contactless payment service, meaning that users will be able to use their mobile phones to pay for London travel instead of an Oyster card.
The service will use EE’s free Cash on Tap mobile contactless payment service app, which is due to be compatible with over 500,000 handsets this year. There will be no added charges for using Cash on Tap to pay for travel, and both daily and weekly caps ensure customers won’t pay any more than they would using an Oyster card.
“Users of the world’s greatest tube network will shortly benefit from the latest in mobile payment technology, allowing them to use their phone to pay for their daily commute,” said Gerry McQuade, chief marketing officer, EE. “As more and more people benefit from the simplicity, convenience and security that mobile contactless payments offer, it’s rapidly becoming clear that the days of the physical wallet are fast becoming numbered.”
Speaking at the IAB’s Mobile Engage conference in May, Weve’s CEO, David Sear, said that 2014 is the year in which there will be a “massive shift” in the way people use their mobile devices and that consumers are at the “tapping point” of contactless payments.
Sear said that the desire for consumers to be able to use their mobile phones for payments – devices that they are “emotionally attached” to – is a natural progression for the relationship between consumers and smartphones.
“We trust our devices – they contain our lives – and payment is a natural extension of that trust.”
Via: MediaTel

Internet of Things Brings Opportunities for Brands

The media landscape has just got used to owned, earned and paid media, but is it now time to get used to non-media turning into media too?
The Internet of Things, where everyday objects and devices communicate with each other, could transform our toasters, cars and thermostats into ad opportunities.
When Google predicted a world where ads appear on “refrigerators, car dashboards, thermostats, glasses and watches” in a letter to the US Securities and Exchange Commission, many media ears pricked up.
Already, devices such as Google’s Nest and British Gas’ Hive thermostats and Philips’ Hue light bulbs are controlled by mobile apps. The next stage of the Internet of Things would be to create a protocol allowing the devices to interact with each other.
How wide-ranging this will be is open to debate, but the direction of travel is set. If objects can collect data about how their owners use them, this will produce invaluable insights into people’s behaviour for marketers. Brands could put ads on those objects or use insights from the data to post personalised ads on smartphones, TVs or tablets.
Andy Hobsbawm, the founder and chief marketing officer of Evrythng, believes the Internet of Things offers a “tremendous media opportunity”. He notes that, as objects become networked, interactive and trackable, they will inevitably become media with “digital interfaces” for personalised content, services and experiences.
He adds: “As with any media, there’s also a challenge in extracting new intelligence from the data generated by billions of these objects coming online. Without a common standard, the opportunities could be limited.”
Some fear this could lead to a dystopian future of spam ads that misinterpret data and serve up irrelevant and inappropriate advertising.
As Dan Kirby, the chief executive of Techdept, says: “The data created by your ‘things’ communicating means amazing insights into consumer needs. This gives marketers a great deal of power, but power that has to be used responsibly. The opportunity for tone-deaf ads – imagine your house burns down, and up pops a message: ‘It seems you need a new sofa!’ – means it could undermine as well as empower a brand.”
There is no doubt that the data from smart devices could offer a huge source of insight for companies, governments and agencies alike. According to Chrissy Totty, the head of innovation at Vizeum, the increased understanding about individuals’ movements and behaviour will enable “hyper-local, hyper-relevant” messages. However, this requires data to be shared between organisations, in partnerships such as the one recently struck between Posterscope and EE.
“Without sharing, the data will be proprietary to those who have created the devices and the opportunities will remain limited,” Totty says.
“The more invisible the Internet of Things becomes, the less aware consumers will be about the amount of data they are generating and who has access to this.
“Agencies, media owners and brands all need to stay on the right side of the ‘creepy line’, to quote Eric Schmidt – respecting our traditional value exchange with the consumer. Advertising, however smartly targeted, will still need to add value to the consumer and be something they knowingly opt into.”
Via: Campaign Live

AXA Uses EE Mobile Data to Microtarget Outdoor Ads

AXA is using multiple strands of location-based data alongside EE’s data on outdoor smartphone usage to microtarget ads to potential consumers.
The insurance firm says the “game-changing” approach to planning out-of-home advertising will reach decision makers for SMEs, a typically difficult group to reach, by identifying ‘hotspots’ of mobile usage near poster sites.
Brands including Lenovo and British Gas have been trialing the technique since the start of the year in partnership with Posterscope in an attempt to understand how mobile devices can pep up the performance of outdoor campaigns. AXA’s effort, which uses multiple location based data, is being served at scale.
Target areas are initially being established by merging AXA’s own postcode records of SMEs together with industry statistics sourced from the Inter Departmental Business Register to form a map of potential areas. It is then overlaid with insights from Posterscope’s audience panel, data from industry planning tool Route and EE’s mData unit – which tracks the mobile usage habits of audience groups – to identify the most relevant locations before skewing ad placements to mobile hotspots.
AXA says the approach opens the opportunity to identify target audiences through the business contracts EE hold – where by there is less than 10 contacts on the contract – allowing them to infer it’s an SME. Additionally, it can now drill further down into evaluating metrics such as awareness building and sales.
Chris Jones, head of brand and online at AXA UK, says the Havas-planned initiative is part of a wider play to adopt more innovative ways of targeting consumers through data and insight.
It brings into sharp focus a paradigm shift across the outdoor advertising industry whereby brands are using data to target people more effectively by proximity in real-time.
Lenovo ran a two-week promotion for its Yoga Pro 2 tablet in March to reach people in areas where they were actively researching gadget purchases on their smarpthones. Outdoor ads pushed to those hotspots sparked a 200 per cent increase in both ad awareness and purchases consideration, Lenovo claims. Online searches jumped by 150 per cent, the business adds.
Via: Marketing Week

Location Tech and Mobile Map Out Way to Better Business

Surbiton would not normally be thought of as a centre of fashion.
But it is, according to location data analysts at least.

This south west London suburb, home to BBC TV’s fictional Stella Street celebrities, is where young people are more likely to check out fashion sites and apps on their smartphones than almost anywhere else in the UK.

The surprising insight comes from mobile phone network EE, which has collated terabytes of anonymised and aggregated data on more than 20 million UK customers – data that is proving increasingly valuable to retailers and advertisers.
The internet has been a godsend for marketers – enabling them to track our online behaviour to the nth degree.
Now location data from mobiles and other sources has added a whole new layer of detail to the picture – a step-change analogous to the move from videotape to DVD.
“Location analytics are becoming integral to every business strategy,” says David Brussin, chief executive of Monetate, a digital marketing company.
Poster boys and girls
US marketing pioneer John Wanamaker once famously said: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.”
Location analytics is helping to solve that conundrum.
Out-of-home (OOH) advertisers and agencies – those responsible for ads on billboards, bus stops and other physical locations – now know what type of person is passing a specific location at any one time, and what they are doing online.
They can then target their ads accordingly.
“Thanks to location data we now understand the relevance and value of a particular advertising position compared with another,” says James Davies, chief strategy officer at OOH agency Posterscope.
“For instance, commuters at one station may tend to look at financial apps on their phones, whereas people travelling from another station may prefer fashion apps,” he says.
“Knowing this helps advertisers ensure their ads are relevant, which saves money and improves effectiveness.”
With brands spending nearly £1bn a year on outdoor advertising in the UK, relevance is key to getting more bang for your marketing buck.
Posterscope says its partnership with EE has seen advertising effectiveness triple for some of its clients, who include Lenovo, Nationwide and British Gas.
“We now know which bus stop is better than another on the same street,” says Mr Davies.
Music for you
The mobile phone is not only an excellent tool for locating consumers, it is also an increasingly effective way for brands to interact with them.
When people move into a particular zone – crossing a geo-fence as the jargon has it – marketers can send highly targeted offers to their phones – ads relevant to their age, interests and purchasing histories.
For example, during last year’s Proms music festival, which centred around South Kensington’s Royal Albert Hall, Decca Records sent text messages to classical music lovers in the locality offering them free track downloads of artists featured in that night’s programme.
At first, the campaign looked liked proving a damp squib – the geo-fenced area was too narrowly focused around the venue.
But as soon as this was widened to include nearby tube stations, the response rate improved dramatically, the company says.
The campaign illustrated how location analytics could help reach an older demographic that is normally hard to engage, argues Sean O’Connell, director of product and technology at Weve, a joint venture between mobile phone networks Telefonica, Vodafone and EE.
Weve provided Decca’s location-based customer data and helps many other businesses with their marketing campaigns. About 60% of its campaigns in 2013 “included a location element”, says Mr O’Connell.
“The Decca campaign shows how specific and bespoke your marketing can be. And you get much more engagement with this type of marketing – click metrics improve three or four times,” says Mr O’Connell.
Personalised offers
“Location and context aware offers are going to change the world,” says John Bates, chief marketing strategy officer of big data specialist Software AG.
“Say you’re walking past a designer shoe store, you could receive a mobile ad offering a 30% discount off Jimmy Choos if you come in within the next 30 minutes and use a particular credit card.

“This is how the High Street can fight back against Amazon,” he adds. “The real world is fighting back against the virtual world – it’s personalisation on a massive scale.”

Monetate’s David Brussin agrees, saying: “A retailer can offer customers a promotion online, via email or on mobile, which changes dynamically based on their location, highlighting the shop physically closest to them and directing them to visit, and ultimately buy.”
But this kind of highly personalised marketing will only work if consumers are happy to trade some privacy in return for the benefits, Mr O’Connell believes.
“All such services are opt-in,” he says. “Customers give their permission to be indentified. With location technologies, being able to say no is of paramount importance.”
Smart maps
Location data can also help businesses map out ways to improve – literally.
For example, Esri, a specialist in location data mapping, mashes together all sorts of data – censuses, social media streams, weather, land surveys – then adds in location data gleaned from wi-fi, phone masts, GPS, and card transactions.
“Static data is being enhanced by real-time data, and this is making maps dynamic,” says Sharon Grufferty, head of software-as-a-service product management for Esri UK.
“Companies can locate hotspots of Twitter sentiment on a map, for example, and pinpoint where a problem exists, enabling them to tackle it quickly,” she adds.
Such analysis is helping insurers assess household risk far more accurately, energy companies pick the ideal place for a wind farm, and retailers plan their stores, says Ms Grufferty.
For example, retailer Argos, part of Home Retail Group, used Esri’s location mapping expertise to help it decide the best locations for its “click-and-collect” centres, based on in-depth analysis of online and in-store customer behaviour and geo-demographics.
The underperforming, badly located stores were jettisoned, while new and existing stores were stocked more efficiently to suit the local clientele.
“Home Retail Group have been long-term users of mapping software and insight,” says Andrew Stringer, the company’s customer and market insight controller.
“It helps to identify more areas where we can offer great convenience to our customers.”
These days, the old adage “location, location, location” seems to apply as much to business as it does to property investment.
Via: BBC News

Out of Home 200% More Effective When Mobile Data is Used to Plan Ad Campaigns

  • Big data partnership hailed as game-changing as it improves out-of-home advertising effectiveness by a significant margin
  • Posterscope clients using EE data include Lenovo, Nationwide, RBS, Studio Canal, Very.co.uk and British Gas

Out-of-home (OOH) advertising is 200% more effective when mobile data is used to plan campaigns, according to initial results from Posterscope’s exclusive mData partnership with EE.
In a trial conducted from January to May 2014, the pioneering out-of-home (OOH) communications agency used EE’s anonymised and aggregated group level network usage data to optimise OOH media selections and measure increases in ad awareness, purchase consideration and online searches across 120,000 usage hotspots.  Clients, including Lenovo, Nationwide, RBS, Studio Canal, Very.co.uk and British Gas, took part in the trial.
Results from the Lenovo campaign, which featured a control group and group optimised by EE data, include:

Action Increase
Unprompted advert awareness 200%
Purchase consideration 200%
Online searches 150%

To achieve the results, Posterscope feed its proprietary ‘Planner’ app, an algorithm-based tool powered by Route, with EE’s mData.  This data was then used to gain insight into consumers’ movements and location-based digital behaviours when they were out of their homes.  This revealed how, when and where mobile devices are used in relation to, and in the proximity of, OOH media sites nationwide.
“Mobile data is the OOH industry’s biggest game-changer in a decade,” said James Davies, Chief Strategy Officer at Posterscope. “We set out to redefine the approach to OOH planning using big data from EE and the partnership has really delivered.
“We can now accurately identify which outdoor sites are seen by users of particular websites or apps and what they are doing on their mobile devices at the time.  For example, we now know Surbiton and London’s Caledonian Road stations both deliver major peaks in visits to fashion related websites so placing relevant OOH adverts in those areas will increase ad effectiveness.
“A lot has been written about big data’s usefulness recently but this is a real-life example of how we’re using it to transform an industry.  And the best thing is we’re the only OOH agency with a mobile network partnership, enabling us to draw on a dataset which features 27 million mobile users to improve OOH ad effectiveness.
“However, despite this landmark moment for the industry, we believe there’s still more to come.  By using more sophisticated data analysis techniques we’ll be able to identify audiences in real-time, display relevant digital-out-of-home adverts and improve campaign effectiveness even further.  For example, a sportswear brand could use this advanced real-time data to identify runners coming towards a digital screen and then display adverts for products such as running shoes.”
Chris Gobby, Head of mData at EE, said: “At EE we strive to help businesses make better decisions from big data with the results speaking for themselves in our work with Posterscope. We’re excited to be a part of this, and future, ground breaking applications of EE mobile data in out of home advertising and look forward to generating further unique products with Posterscope in the outdoor advertising space.”
[youtube width=”300px” height=”200px”]k-qj_DGiKQY[/youtube]

Posterscope and EE sign exclusive deal to trial use of mobile data in OOH planning

Posterscope has significantly enhanced its market–leading audience insight and campaign planning capabilities by forging a partnership with the UK’s largest mobile network, EE. This unique agreement will see EE provide Posterscope with anonymised and aggregated group level network usage data, that will inform planning and optimise the performance of outdoor advertising campaigns.
The tie-up will deliver Posterscope insights on group level movements and location-based digital behaviours on the move, and an understanding of how, when and where mobile devices are used by large groups of people in relation to, and in the proximity of, OOH media sites throughout the country.
Future applications will enable agency planners to determine the effect that exposure to OOH media at specific locations has on mobile web actions, and to capture data on journey patterns, areas of residence and locations visited by particular audiences. So, for example, it would make it possible to pinpoint hotspots of sports or film usage, and design campaign plans accordingly.
This new data will be incorporated into Posterscope’s own recently launched ‘Planner’ app, an innovative and sophisticated operating system that combines and interprets mass volumes of audience data to optimise the effectiveness and efficiency of campaigns. This tool was primarily developed to leverage access to the raw data within Route – the OOH industry’s audience measurement system – but also integrates data from a variety of other sources.
 
Posterscope is currently signing up launch advertisers with newly optimised campaigns running from November 2013.