Posts

San Juan Beer "Where is my Otorongo?"

For decades, SABMIller’s San Juan beer has been, by far, the favorite beer of the Peruvian Amazon region. Since its launch, a jaguar known as “otorongo”, native to the region, has been its symbol. Sadly, due to deforestation and poaching, the otorongo is now a species in danger of extinction. There are only 6.000 otorongos left in Peru. In order to change this situation, during the hugely popular February carnival, San Juan removed the jaguar from its labels and replaced it with a dog, a pig, a cow and even a rooster. Only 6 thousand bottles with the picture of the otorongo were left, for the purpose of mirroring the problem. Reactions came quickly, ranging from surprise to indignation.
Follow link for video

Honey Nut Cheerios Mascot Goes Missing To Address Declining Bee Populations

In one of the most obvious yet still cool examples of cause marketing, Honey Nut Cheerios in Canada is pledging to help find a solution to unstable bee populations—by launching a whole integrated campaign around the issue, including removing its “Buzz” bee mascot from the packaging for a limited time.

“This is the first time in the brand’s history that we’ve taken ‘Buzz’ off the box,” said Emma Eriksson, director of Marketing for General Mills Canada. “One-third of the foods we depend on for our survival are made possible by the natural pollination work that bees provide. With ongoing losses in bee populations being reported across Canada, we wanted to leverage our packaging to draw attention to this important cause and issue a call to action to Canadians to help plant 35 million wildflowers—one for every person in Canada.”

The supporting campaign, by Cossette, also includes a new TV spot and online video, amicrosite, contesting, consumer sampling and PR.

The brand is giving away free wildflower seeds packs and encouraging people across Canada to visit BringBackTheBees.ca and request free seed packs in the mail.

The brand will also be on hand at the Canada Blooms festival, handing out 50,000 Veseys wildflower seed packs to visitors.

“General Mills’ decision to draw attention to the issue of declining bee populations marks the continuation of its commitment to purpose-based marketing, which means brands will go beyond traditional statements such as product benefit in order to align with what’s really important to consumers,” says Cossette chief creative officer Peter Ignazi. “By taking the bold step of removing a well-established brand symbol from its packaging, General Mills is further challenging marketing’s conventional thinking to underscore its point.”

The BringBackTheBees campaign will run from March to July.

Video below:

[youtube width=”300px” height=”200px”]9fbMQUVYuRQ[/youtube]

Via: Ad Week

Giant Air Purifier Appears in Peru

In Lima, the notoriously polluted capital of Peru, a retired naval engineer by the name of Jorge Gutierrez has invented a giant air purifier and has placed it in Lima’s district of Jesus Maria.
The giant air purifier has been termed by Gutierrez as a “super tree”, and they include large billboards that act as giant air purifiers, or a filter of sorts, to absorb carbon dioxide and smog.
The clean air is then channelled into a section of the purifier, connected by tubes. What is shocking is the sheer, visible quantity of smog and contaminants that is collected as a result.
Via: Design Taxi
 

FCB's Giant Eco-Civic Project would Create a South African Flag Visible from Space

FCB South Africa is running an idea up the flagpole. A really big idea. In fact, the idea is ginormous. And its main component is a South African flag so large, it will be visible from space, 30 miles above the Earth.

The Giant Flag project was put in motion last month by Guy Lieberman, the agency’s head of green and social new business development. The initiative is ultimately designed to foster national pride, improve the lives of people in need and make a lasting impact on South Africa’s economy and environment.

The proposed flag will measure 66 hectares—about the size of 66 soccer fields. Its red, green, blue and gold sections will consist of millions of cacti and succulent plants that can thrive in the semi-arid Karoo region, offsetting some 90,000 tons of carbon emissions annually. Solar panels designed to power the equivalent of 4,000 homes will make up the flag’s triangular black patch. (They will also “harvest” rainwater to feed the flag’s living components.) The white areas will be access roads.

The project will provide more than 700 jobs in Camdeboo Municipality, where the unemployment runs over 40 percent, and support tourism, hospitality and various enterprises over the long haul. Moreover, Lieberman says, it will serve as a symbol of hope, cooperation and sustainable growth for South Africa and beyond.

Lieberman drew his inspiration from the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa, noting “the nation’s huge emotional response to our flag.” After the World Cup, FCB launched the much-praised “Keep Flying” campaign to encourage the nation to maintain its momentum.

Crowdfunding and corporate efforts are under way. All told, it will cost about $20 million, with $2 million being the threshold to begin the massive germination project, followed by clearing the land, fencing off the site, building roads and constructing the solar field.

What’s more, South Africa’s Department of Environmental Affairs is lending its support, and corporate sponsors such as Google and Toyota “have come on board because they see the value this will have on the nation, as well as on their brand,” Lieberman says. “It also speaks to their commitment to game-changing initiatives, and in this sense the Giant Flag is not tied to any one nation—it is global.”

Via: AdWeek

McDonald's Stockholm Lets Young People Use Cans as Currency for Food

A new initiative created by DDB Stockholm for McDonald’s lets young people pay for their McDonald’s meal with discarded cans as currency.
In summer, when spending time at outdoor parks and music festivals are eminent, trash also tends to be a problem. Young people are also often short of cash.
McDonald’s has reconciled the two insights to create ‘jobs’ that engage youth to pick up cans for recycling, and in doing so, get a free meal.
One billboard in Stockholm was turned into a trash bag dispenser that distributed trash bags for litter collection. On each bag was printed the ‘exchange rate’ of what certain McDonald’s menu items were worth.
A recycled can is worth 1 Krona (approximately $ 0.14). Ten cans could be exchanged for a hamburger, 20 cans for a cheeseburger, and 40 cans for a Big Mac.
This idea not only gives youth an incentive to pick up litter, but also results in a cleaner environment for all. It will be adopted at other festivals this year and the next.
Via: Design Taxi

Water Purifying Plant Billboard is Trying to Clean Up One of Manila’s Most Polluted Rivers

A floating billboard from the Japanese beauty brand Shokubutsu HANA was recently installed on the extremely polluted Pasig River in the Philippines. The billboard is made from a type of grass that can absorb toxic materials and help to reduce pollution.
Vetiver, a perennial, non-invasive grass often used to treat wastewater and stabilize landfills and garbage dumpsites, has been shaped with the simple message, “CLEAN RIVER SOON.” According to Hana’s website, the billboard is able to clean 2 to 8 thousand gallons of water per day, thanks to its ability to tolerate high levels of nitrates, phosphates and heavy metals.
While this particular billboard was created to fit with Hana’s belief that healthy beauty can be brought about by the restorative power of nature, it’s also in line with a recent trend to create restorative advertising.
The billboard is the first of its kind in the Philippines, and came about from a collaboration between Hana, The Pasig River Rehabilitation Commission, Vetiver Farms Philippines and the advertising agency TBWA\SMP. More water billboards are planned for various sections of the river.
Via: psfk

That's Not a Tree!

New York City has so few trees that people there might have forgotten what a tree is, exactly. At least, that’s the tongue-in-cheek idea behind the New York Restoration Project’s new campaign from ad agency Tierney.
The effort involves tagging objects around the city (especially in low-tree/high-traffic neighborhoods) with labels that read, “Not a Tree.” Accompanying text says, “There aren’t enough trees in the city. Let’s change that,” along with the NotATree.org URL.
“Yes, a Tree” tags will go on saplings planted as part of NYRP’s MillionTreesNYC project. Text on those reads, “Thank you. This is exactly what our city needs.”
The campaign also includes more traditional media, including TV, radio (“That little red thing on the sidewalk that dogs like to tinkle on? Not a tree”), print, billboards and online quiz banners. It runs May through June, which is prime planting season.
The New York Restoration Project, founded by Bette Midler, hopes to plant 1 million new trees by 2017.
Via: AdWeek

Portfolio Items