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CES 2018: The out-of-home perspective

With a strong emphasis on smart cities, there were clear implications for the out-of-home sector at this year’s Consumer Electronics Show, writes Ahmad Sayar, VP of Strategy and Innovation at Posterscope US.
Last year marked the 50th anniversary of CES, the largest global gathering of technology and innovation, with over 4,000 exhibitors spanning across 2.6 million square feet of exhibition space. Over 180,000 industry professionals attended in 2017, 58,000 from outside the US, making it truly a record-breaking event.
In simpler terms, CES is unlike any other trade show. Since its inaugural year in 1967, when the show took place in New York City versus Las Vegas, it has set the bar for excellence in technology and innovation, and since then, has grown exponentially.
So, to say that CES 2018 had some big shoes to fill would be an understatement. How would CES 2018 kick off the next 50 years in breakthrough technologies and next-generation innovations? Despite the torrential downpour (first rain in Las Vegas in 116 days) and a two-hour power blackout the following day, CES 2018 was an absolute hit.
With a strong emphasis on Smart Cities, there were clear implications for the Out-of-Home (OOH) industry and multiple brands gave us a glimpse of life in the future.
Transportation, Smarter Cities and OOH
The way we get around is going to drastically change in the next decade. Some of the world’s largest companies are investing heavily in changing how people travel. Virgin is projecting to have three Hyperloop, electric propulsion, high speed, train-like transportation systems in service by 2021 and is continuing to expand its efforts throughout the US and Middle East. Mercedes-Benz unveiled the Smart Vision EQ which completely embodies the idea of autonomous. The vehicle lacks a steering wheel and pedals and provides the driver with a fully “hands-off” experience.
But what caught my eye is what Ford is doing with its new mobility services network. Ford has partnered up with the likes of Domino’s, Lyft and Postmates to create a fully autonomous delivery and rideshare economy.
The partnership is powered by its mobility services platform and can provide users with a constant flow of data that includes efficient routes and seamless transitions between vehicles, public transportation and payment nodes, changing the way we’ll move for the better.
To improve the everyday journey, and in collaboration with Qualcomm, Ford’s Cellular Vehicle to Everything (C-V2X) technology has the potential to help cities around the world create safer, more capable infrastructure and connect vehicles to a larger communications system. It is these such mobility networks that are the key component in the growth and sustainability of smart cities.
As a result, cities can reclaim space that was once solely used for cars and transform the street into a space for people that offers a place to stop, consume and connect. This presents a prime opportunity for the OOH industry to simultaneously expand its efforts and continue to play a key role in the growth of smart cities.
Imagine city centres, void of any vehicles, focused on free moving people and connected through dynamic OOH inventory, which leverages real-time data collected from sensors built into static structures, connected objects or more complex systems like Ford’s C-V2X vision.
The underlying commodity for the OOH industry is the sheer amount of data that will be available.
It is the ability to leverage real-world activities, happening in both a physical and digital space, in real-time, to create a memorable consumer connection. With so much free-flowing data available, the idea of following the consumer journey has never been more real. But the value proposition is not limited to just hyper-targeted messaging; smart cities will influence how OOH media is planned and bought. The goal is to minimise ad waste and maximise effectiveness by leveraging data to pinpoint how your target audience moves throughout the day and reach them at the right time and place.
As leaders and politicians are urged to innovate, improve the quality of life and increase profitability, cities around the world are quickly adopting the smart city initiative. As Ford showcased, there are clear transportation and infrastructure benefits, and continued investments from both the public and private sectors are being made to drive this movement forward.
New York City has seen this first hand with multiple street closures, converted to pedestrian areas, and supplemented with multi-functioning and connected OOH inventory. It is estimated that around three million people are moving to cities every week and approximately 54% of people worldwide now live in cities, up from 30% in 1950. As cities continue to grow and innovate, brands will need to compete even harder to grab the attention of their target audience, and it will be up to the OOH industry to help make that real-world and custom connection possible.
Ahmad Sayar is VP, Strategy & Innovation, Posterscope (US)
Via: MediaTel Newsline

Virtuality can be close to reality in Renault's "Drive the Future" VR experience

Renault took a VR-experience to a whole new level in it’s new campaign.
Passengers on a flight were given a VR-device through which they could see the ‘future’, of them disembarking the plane upon arrival, with some very unusual events occurring as they walked through the airport. They are hit by a boy playing with a ball and pass a woman in red on the travellator, before they get into the new Renault model and are taken on a rollercoaster ride.
When they actually get off the plane, then same events that occurred in the VR film, happened in real life, much to the confusion of the passengers, before being taken on a real Renault test drive.
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Via: Guerilla Blog
 

Will Driverless Cars Signal a New Opportunity for Roadside Posters?

The UK is set to allow driverless cars on the roads of Britain from January 2015. Business secretary Vince Cable said computer-controlled vehicles will be trialled in three cities next year, and the government will be making a £10m fund available for developing the technology in the UK. But what’s this mean for the out of home (OOH) industry?
Alarmists are likely already jumping at the chance to declare this the beginning of the end for roadside OOH sites. After all, if no one’s driving the car, who’s looking at the road and the adverts around it?
However, this is a something of a short-sighted position to take. In fact, driverless cars could be of tremendous value to the OOH industry. These automated vehicles will collect and generate a huge amount more data, which will enable advertisers to target their messaging to passengers far more accurately. Data is already being used innovatively for OOH targeting, such as a recent Mini campaign that used car recognition technology to display personalised content whenever a Mini driver passed a poster site. As driverless cars increase the data set available, the techniques and technology used to leverage it will become far more sophisticated.
Driverless cars also open up a huge new area for advertisers, as all of a sudden former drivers will have a great deal of time on their hands. Broadcasters, entertainment companies like Netflix and media giants like Google will be competing over an entirely new smart car entertainment ecosystem. There’s even the potential for these companies to subsidise the cost of the cars to ensure they are a part of the environment. Google’s already been looking at how it can monetise free taxi rides in driverless cars – serving ads in automated taxis to passengers during their ride rather than charging a fare. This opens a new opportunity for OOH to influence consumers’ digital behaviour, an attribute the medium has proven itself to excel at already.
As time moves on and we come to better understand the new consumption behaviours driverless cars will breed, the OOH industry is going to gain a much greater understanding of the impact of location. If driverless cars do become the norm, we’ll need to redefine what makes a ‘good’ OOH location beyond traditional high value locations to entirely new sites designed to capture the attention of a new generation of window gazers.
Passengers may well fill some of their time surfing the web, watching a film or reading a book, but that won’t be all they do. Natural human curiosity to know where you are and what’s out there, the stop-start nature of urban travel and an inevitable increase in motion sickness will keep passengers gazing out of the window. To all the naysayers, I implore you to think back to your last car ride as a passenger – did you take a look out of the window during the ride?
Ben Milne- Head of Innovation, Posterscope UK
Via: The Wall Blog

Moscow Introduces New Age Transportation with Futuristic Trams

Russia-based research and production company Uralvagonzavodhas unveiled their highly futuristic trams at the Innoprom-2014.
Called the ‘Russia One’ or ‘R1’, the tram can run for 50 kilometers on batteries alone. This innovative tram also has an overhanging cabin nose that gives the driver a 30% wider view around that can minimize road accidents.
Its interior is modern and stylish as well, with the capacity to carry 190-270 passengers at one time, depending on its configuration.
Despite its sleek exterior, the construction of the tram is cost-efficient, with the body made of composition materials and Russia-made bogies—the vital area where wheels meet rails, that are significantly cheaper.
Via: Design Taxi

What’s Next for Out of Home?

Roman Greze, MD of Limited Space, discusses what he thinks is next for the Out-of-Home industry.
Out of home (OOH) advertising has made unparalleled leaps in capability and greater creative thinking, it has the power to captivate target consumers to a higher degree. Innovation and technology have raised the stakes in how advertisers deploy OOH to accelerate and amplify online, social and mobile advertising campaigns by allowing consumers to interact and transact with brands.
The potential of OOH lies in its ubiquity to reach consumers where other media don’t go. When layered on top with screen technology like interactive touch screens, near field communications (NFC), and a host of other advanced technologies like geo-targeting and augmented reality, advertisers can interact, to create genuine, two-way brand relationships.
Outdoor drives a better online search uplift than TV in some sectors, showing a 5.5 per cent increase in travel search terms versus 3.5 per cent for TV and a 3 per cent uplift for insurance keywords compared with TV’s 0.6 per cent, claims The Outdoor Media Centre.
Digital and NFC-enabled sites, or those offering free wifi, have made OOH much more responsive and in real-time. The use of interactive displays has allowed OOH campaigns to tie into digital and online campaigns well. Compared to traditional OOH campaigns, using interactive displays on LED screens and other formats allow companies to increase their chance of conversions by promoting more instant interactions with the customer. LED technology is also expected to play a big part in this shift, as it’s great for viewing from long distances; it also allows for interactive capability and will be implemented across different locations from shopping malls to highway billboards.
Twitter is an obvious choice for putting social engagement at the centre of interactivity. During the curling final at the Sochi Winter Olympics, Cadbury Curly Wurly ran a tactical digital campaign with the catchline: “The difference between a curling stone and a Curly Wurly: you don’t let go of a Curly Wurly.” This was broadcast in real time so that drivers could see the image change while listening to the curling final on their car radios.
Weather is a popular theme that carries through some of the most successful campaigns. Land Rover recently launched their #hibernot campaign using digital posters to engage consumers by encouraging people to get out and enjoy all the elements of a British winter. The brand used the OOH element to provide a ‘reward’ for those engaging with the campaign by using their images on the digital outdoor posters. Ford recently ran a ‘thermal geo-targeting’ campaign where the image that appears on screens changes with the temperature and with rain, sleet or snow.
So what’s next for OOH? Apart from interaction and digital displays there are many strategies being applied online that will soon be helping OOH advertising innovate once again. For example, social media platforms such as Foursquare have already begun letting customers check into displays and receive corresponding benefits. This allows for different deals to be given out at different locations, which relates back to targeting. The use of interactive screens will also allow OOH campaigns to seed further into digital and online campaigns as well. Imagine social media contests and check-ins, being combined with displays in places like shopping centres where brands can directly boost spend. This cross-platform marketing would allow for companies to experience a level of interaction with customers and deliver potential for conversion that’s been previously unattainable for a long time.
The quality of technology has helped boost the capability of brands to target consumers through engaging their senses. Digital screen sites, for instance, deliver cinema-quality digital content, a static full screen surround artwork wrap and full zonal sound audio to fully engage with shoppers through multiple stimuli. Ensuring that the location is on the shoppers’ journey is important here too because they’ll already be in the right frame of mind and be more receptive to entertainment. When a watch brand wants to target shoppers, what better place to elicit engagement than with screens in a shopping mall minutes away from an H.M.Samuel or Goldsmiths?
There is a magical gap between what people expect from OOH and what they experience. Consumers now expect a dynamic experience from their smart phones and televisions but when they see an OOH board they expect the same fixed reality. This is where the OOH market is beginning to change. The landscape is the perfect delivery medium for more bespoke and creative experiences and can fully embrace these new technologies in an age where the value of targeting consumers when their senses are open to movements in ads cannot be underestimated.
Via: The Wall Blog

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