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Water Purifying Plant Billboard is Trying to Clean Up One of Manila’s Most Polluted Rivers

A floating billboard from the Japanese beauty brand Shokubutsu HANA was recently installed on the extremely polluted Pasig River in the Philippines. The billboard is made from a type of grass that can absorb toxic materials and help to reduce pollution.
Vetiver, a perennial, non-invasive grass often used to treat wastewater and stabilize landfills and garbage dumpsites, has been shaped with the simple message, “CLEAN RIVER SOON.” According to Hana’s website, the billboard is able to clean 2 to 8 thousand gallons of water per day, thanks to its ability to tolerate high levels of nitrates, phosphates and heavy metals.
While this particular billboard was created to fit with Hana’s belief that healthy beauty can be brought about by the restorative power of nature, it’s also in line with a recent trend to create restorative advertising.
The billboard is the first of its kind in the Philippines, and came about from a collaboration between Hana, The Pasig River Rehabilitation Commission, Vetiver Farms Philippines and the advertising agency TBWA\SMP. More water billboards are planned for various sections of the river.
Via: psfk

A Billboard That Does Good

A giant poster that uses nanotechnology has been created by a scientist and an award winning poet from the University of Sheffield.
The two professors came up with the idea of a poster absorbing poisonous compounds from the air with the aim of cutting disease and saving lives.
The poster can absorb poisonous compounds from around 20 cars each day if put by a busy road.
The 10m by 20m poster is coated with microscopic, pollution-eating nanoparticles of titanium dioxide. When the light hits the nanoparticles, they react with oxygen, and wash the pollution out of the air.
Although the poster does not filter out all the pollutants from traffic, it does remove nitrogen oxides which have been linked to breathing problems including asthma.
A poem by Simon Armitage, called ‘In Praise of Air’ features on the poster.
The poster will be on display in Sheffield for the next year.
Via: BBC

That's Not a Tree!

New York City has so few trees that people there might have forgotten what a tree is, exactly. At least, that’s the tongue-in-cheek idea behind the New York Restoration Project’s new campaign from ad agency Tierney.
The effort involves tagging objects around the city (especially in low-tree/high-traffic neighborhoods) with labels that read, “Not a Tree.” Accompanying text says, “There aren’t enough trees in the city. Let’s change that,” along with the NotATree.org URL.
“Yes, a Tree” tags will go on saplings planted as part of NYRP’s MillionTreesNYC project. Text on those reads, “Thank you. This is exactly what our city needs.”
The campaign also includes more traditional media, including TV, radio (“That little red thing on the sidewalk that dogs like to tinkle on? Not a tree”), print, billboards and online quiz banners. It runs May through June, which is prime planting season.
The New York Restoration Project, founded by Bette Midler, hopes to plant 1 million new trees by 2017.
Via: AdWeek

This Billboard Cleans the Air!

Peru is in the middle of a construction boom that generates a lot of unhealthy pollution. Peruvian engineering university UTEC and its ad agency, FCB Mayo, decided to create an air-purifying billboard designed to mitigate the environmental damage the school causes as it builds a new campus.
The billboard has the added advantage of promoting the new campus, boosted by the claim that the school will help students learn how to do things like create billboards that filter about 100,000 cubic meters of clean air a day, reaching as far as five blocks away and equivalent to what some 1,200 trees would do.
The environmentally friendly campaign is part of a tried-and-true strategy for UTEC and FCB Mayo. Last year they famously created a billboard that helped address a rainfall shortage in Lima by converting atmospheric humidity into clean drinking water.
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Via: AdWeek

In Paris, Waste Paper Is ‘Transformed’ Into A Phoenix

A 6-sheet with a slot was placed along l’avenue de l’Opera in Paris, letting passers-by dispose of their waste paper. A new paper sculpture of a phoenix emerged days later.
Using this mythological animal as a metaphor, these two creatives show that recycling is about using your ingenuity to make magic out of seemingly useless objects.
The campaign was for French NGO, Ecofolio, to show the benefits of recycling.
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Via: Design Taxi

Green Pedestrian Crossing creates leaves

To encourage everyone to walk more and drive less, the China Environmental Protection Foundation created ‘Green’ pedestrian crossings using canvasses and ink pads. Giant white canvasses with a bare tree were placed across 132 crosswalks in 15 cities, and as pedestrian crossed, their shoe soles, imprinted with a small amount of green paint, left behind a trail of leaf-like footprints. Almost 4m people passed through the installations, and the final posters were eventually hung in several urban locations.
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