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Dating app billboards tell charming stories with long-copy, site specific ads in NYC

Dating app Hinge‘s new out-of-home campaign in New York City is deceptively simple. There’s more going on than initially meets the eye—including data mining behind the scenes, copywriting that cleverly embodies the brand promise, and contextual placement that should bring a smile to those who encounter the work.
Hinge differs from rivals like Tinder in one key way. It matches you with people who are friends of your friends in social media. This added closeness means, hopefully, that you’ll have more things in common and be able to make a real connection—amid an online dating scene notoriously awash in fakery.
The OOH ads, from Barton F. Graf, double down on this idea of real connections by introducing the tagline “Let’s be real” and telling stories inspired by real user responses to what Hinge calls “prompts”—questions the app asks its users to glean info about their likes, dislikes, quirks and general personality types.
The Barton team wrote the billboards based off these data insights, then added site-specific references to the copy that tie each ad to its location—referencing a bowling alley next to one of the ads, for example, or a brew pub near another.
The long-copy executions embody Hinge’s brand message in another way, too. They take a little while to read, and thus stand in stark contrast to the lightning speed of everything online. “They really reflect our ethos,” says Hinge founder Justin McLeod. “If you slow down and put in a bit of extra effort, there can be huge rewards.”
In its data-driven approach to OOH, the campaign is also a bit reminiscent of what Spotify has been doing on its own billboards—scraping user data to inform the copywriting, which should help forge a closer connection to the type of person who might use the service.

Making the billboards site-specific embeds them a little deeper in their neighborhoods, McLeod says. “We really wanted them to be striking, and part of that is being contextual,” he says. “It’s not every day that an ad you see on the street is referencing the restaurant next door.”
The run-on style of the sentences was also calculated.
“It’s this feeling of being a little bit whimsical,” says McLeod. “And also, this idea that one prompt [on Hinge] can lead to a text, that can lead to a conversation, that can lead to a date, that can lead to a relationship, that can lead to marriage, that can lead to kids. It’s that kind of cause-and-effect.”

 
 
 

Five Top Trends for Out-of-Home in 2015

The last couple of years have seen the out-of-home (OOH) industry evolve more rapidly than ever before, but 2015 is set to be the industry’s most transformative year yet. An ever expanding network of digital inventory and increasingly sophisticated targeting technologies are enabling advertisers to increase both campaign efficiency and effectiveness, reaching their audiences in creative and engaging new ways. Here are Posterscope’s top five predictions for what 2015 holds for OOH advertisers. Click here
These predictions are just the tip of the iceberg. We’ll also see advances in OOH accountability, increasing amounts of content served via DOOH screens and a growing focus on furnishing consumers with experiences via multiple channels. The industry is at an incredibly exciting moment in its history, and 2015 will see it become an even more important consideration for advertisers.

Tapping in to better insights from big data

James Davies, CSO Posterscope,  appeared in EE feature  ‘Tapping in to better insights from big data’ in the Daily Telegraph Business section.  Davies discussed how Posterscope and EE are using mobile data for location-based OOH advertising.  The article, written by Chris Price, can be read below or accessed online.
” Why Surbiton station is a massive fashion hotspot” 

It may not be a name you are familiar with, but chances are that you will have seen one of Posterscope’s ads on your way to work this morning.
Bus stops, tube stations, even petrol pumps and shopping trolleys are just some of the locations where Posterscope buys advertising space on behalf of its clients, which include ZenithOptimedia, and brands such as KFC and Coca-Cola.
The company was behind the recent campaign to turn the iconic red London bus black, on behalf of Adidas. “It’s one of the few times where you can be walking down the street and you will overhear someone saying ‘look at that bus’,” says James Davies, Posterscope’s chief strategy officer.
The company claims to have around a 30pc share of the out-of-home (OOH) advertising market. With such a vast selection of OOH places to advertise, a large part of Posterscope’s job is to provide intelligence to clients.
“As a client you need specialist businesses to guide you because there are so many options,” explains Mr Davies. “Should I be on petrol pump nozzles or on the side of a bus? Once you’ve decided on the medium, you need to pick the location because with thousands of bus stops out there, you’re not going to choose all of them.”
Traditionally, when planning campaigns Posterscope has relied on proprietary research and industry level data to give some demographic information about a poster site. However, it has now gone one step further and added a “third level” — that of mobile data (mData) in partnership with EE.
Here insights based on anonymised and aggregated mobile network usage data is shared by EE to Posterscope to provide more accurate locationbased information for planning advertising campaigns on behalf of a client.
“mData allows you to go one step further than demographics so you can tell what groups of people are actually doing on their phones at a particular location,” says Mr Davies.
In a recent campaign for computer/tablet manufacturer Lenovo, for example, Posterscope was able to select sites where it knew people were more likely to be looking at technology websites. “As a result, people’s awareness of the campaign was twice as high in these hotspots,” says Mr Davies.
Since it started the mData partnership with EE last October, Posterscope has also used mobile research to uncover a few surprises. Says Mr Davies: “We were looking at places to advertise for one fashion client and were researching where people were looking at ASOS and Very’s websites on their mobile. We discovered that Surbiton station is a massive fashion hotspot.”
 
Source: The Daily Telegraph 

Martell Launches its First Ever Integrated Mobile and OOH Campaign

Martell’s first ever integrated mobile and OOH campaign, planned by Posterscope and Havas Media, launched last week.
The campaign places Martell as the key ingredient for a very special night, alongside good food and music. This theme is promoted through OOH in order to drive consumers in-store for the chance to win a luxury stay at Raymond Blanc’s Le Manoir aux Quat’Saisons hotel with an intimate performance by Katherine Jenkins.
The integrated planning approach sees POS OOH media placements amplified with location based mobile messaging provided by WEVE. The use of this technology enhances consumer branding at optimal times and locations and engages consumers with contextually relevant ads right in the palm of their hands.
Posterscope and Havas Media aim to accelerate their understanding of integrated planning by measuring the value of the communications through the combination of both physical and mobile location based media.