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These 'Don't Smoke and Drive' posters from Uruguay are made of marijuana

Created for Uruguay’s Association of Cannabis Studies, these “potsters” are an out-of-home initiative featuring three posters printed on paper made from marijuana. Copy reminds the public about the dangers of operating a vehicle under the influence of pot, which Uruguay fully legalized for production and sale in 2013.

Each of the signs measures 5.6 feet high by 3 feet wide and carries the tagline, “If you smoked, don’t drive.” They sprouted just after Christmas in highly trafficked areas of Montevideo, and will stay on the streets for a few more weeks.

“We reasoned that if posters made out of pot gave you advice about safer driving, it was probably the most ideal way in which marijuana can actually be beneficial to someone while behind the wheel,” says Juan Ciapessoni, co-founder and chief creative officer of The Electric Factory, which developed the campaign with outdoor ad firm JCDecaux.

Once the fibrous hemp was shredded, flattened and dried, the sheets were painstakingly hand-crafted, just as an artisan might create specialty papers from scraps of recycled material. A silk-screening process was used to apply the text. (Ciapessoni declined to reveal how much weed was used to create the posters, nor would he divulge its source.)

Sure, it’s a gimmick to grab attention, but “the main objective of all of this is to make people understand how important is to be very responsible when driving,” Ciapessoni says. “It was equally important for us to send a big message so that it will have meaningful social impact.”

The “potsters” are also vandal proof – anyone thinking of stealing the signs and trying to smoke them are in for a let down.

“It would be really funny, but not effective, because the process for producing the paper removed the psychoactive effect,” says Ciapessoni. “So if someone smoked it, it would be like smoking a standard paper.”

Via: Ad Week

The Real World November 2015

The Real World is Posterscope’s monthly Out-of-Home market update, containing latest industry news, key facts and figures and some really cool OOH campaigns.  The presentation can be accessed here

Peugeot Creates Social Poster Campaign to Launch New 108 Model

Peugeot has teamed with designer Adam Pobiak to create 108 limited edition silkscreen posters to push its new 108 model and is offering fans the chance to win one via a new social campaign.
With help from social marketing agency 33seconds, the car marque will use CRM to identify and reach out to new owners of the 108 and ask them to tweet and share a photo of them with their new car, holding up a sign with the hashtag #My108.
The first 108 to take part will win one of the limited edition posters, with other entrants set to receive a digital print.
The campaign aims to promote the personalisation element of the new car: with each poster individually numbered with an abstract interpretation of the creative themes.
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Via: The Drum

Will Driverless Cars Signal a New Opportunity for Roadside Posters?

The UK is set to allow driverless cars on the roads of Britain from January 2015. Business secretary Vince Cable said computer-controlled vehicles will be trialled in three cities next year, and the government will be making a £10m fund available for developing the technology in the UK. But what’s this mean for the out of home (OOH) industry?
Alarmists are likely already jumping at the chance to declare this the beginning of the end for roadside OOH sites. After all, if no one’s driving the car, who’s looking at the road and the adverts around it?
However, this is a something of a short-sighted position to take. In fact, driverless cars could be of tremendous value to the OOH industry. These automated vehicles will collect and generate a huge amount more data, which will enable advertisers to target their messaging to passengers far more accurately. Data is already being used innovatively for OOH targeting, such as a recent Mini campaign that used car recognition technology to display personalised content whenever a Mini driver passed a poster site. As driverless cars increase the data set available, the techniques and technology used to leverage it will become far more sophisticated.
Driverless cars also open up a huge new area for advertisers, as all of a sudden former drivers will have a great deal of time on their hands. Broadcasters, entertainment companies like Netflix and media giants like Google will be competing over an entirely new smart car entertainment ecosystem. There’s even the potential for these companies to subsidise the cost of the cars to ensure they are a part of the environment. Google’s already been looking at how it can monetise free taxi rides in driverless cars – serving ads in automated taxis to passengers during their ride rather than charging a fare. This opens a new opportunity for OOH to influence consumers’ digital behaviour, an attribute the medium has proven itself to excel at already.
As time moves on and we come to better understand the new consumption behaviours driverless cars will breed, the OOH industry is going to gain a much greater understanding of the impact of location. If driverless cars do become the norm, we’ll need to redefine what makes a ‘good’ OOH location beyond traditional high value locations to entirely new sites designed to capture the attention of a new generation of window gazers.
Passengers may well fill some of their time surfing the web, watching a film or reading a book, but that won’t be all they do. Natural human curiosity to know where you are and what’s out there, the stop-start nature of urban travel and an inevitable increase in motion sickness will keep passengers gazing out of the window. To all the naysayers, I implore you to think back to your last car ride as a passenger – did you take a look out of the window during the ride?
Ben Milne- Head of Innovation, Posterscope UK
Via: The Wall Blog

MTV Green picks initiative

A poster in bars and music venues that transforms your expired cards into brand new guitar picks.
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