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The National Gallery of Prague is using VR to introduce the blind to iconic sculptures

“No touching!”
The phrase is the bane of many children who find themselves in museums meant to teach them how to appreciate art … but instead teach them they’re bulls in china shops.
This must be all the more frustrating for the blind, who mostly can’t conceive of the art at all if they can’t use their other senses. With this in mind, the National Gallery of Prague launched “Touching Masterpieces,” a campaign that lets them touch iconic sculptures in virtual space.
Created with help from Geometry Prague and NeuroDigital, in collaboration with the Leontinka Foundation for the blind and visually impaired, the virtual reality experience features haptic Avatar VR gloves, specially adapted for this campaign, that let the blind “touch” work like Michelangelo’s David, Venus de Milo and the bust of Nefertiti.
Think of it as the anatomy lesson you never had.
“Blind children are usually taught in school with relief aids and tactile pictures that far from accurately reflect reality,” explains Barbara Hucková, executive director of the Leontinka Foundation. “This new technology is an incredible breakthrough allowing pupils to touch what was absolutely unattainable before.”
Like the world imagined in Ready Player One, haptic gloves enable you to touch 3-D objects in virtual space. When you reach out to touch something, your sense of depth and texture passes through the unit as vibrating feedback. Multi-frequency technology can stimulate different types of skin cells’ tactile responses, giving the blind a detailed “sense” of the object they’re touching.
“Through curiosity, pursuit of innovation and a passion for creativity, we realized that specially-adapted haptic technology could open doors to a unique art experience for the blind,” says Geometry Prague creative director Julia Dovlatova. “Our collaboration with NeuroDigital helped us fine tune haptic gloves to ‘see’ art through virtual reality touch.”
“Touching Masterpieces” went live at the National Gallery of Prague between March 23-24.
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Via: AdWeek

Top Eleven players step into Mourinho's shoes in VR press conference

In a bid to see if football fans have the ability to manage a career defining press conference, Top Eleven, the world’s most played football manager game, has once again enlisted the help of football legend, José Mourinho. This time, the game – which has over 160 million players worldwide – hosted one of the first immersive virtual reality press conferences.
Using the latest VR technology, a prototype was created to put Top Eleven players through their paces as part of a once in a lifetime opportunity. A number of Top Eleven players were selected to experience a star as a top football manager in a high pressure press conference scenario, stepping into the shoes of José Mourinho. In a test of resilience, participants were quizzed on typical football situations that premiership managers, like José, experience whenever they are grilled by the media. The topics ranged from team selection and management style, to reputation and recent wayward behaviour of star players.
Upon removing the masks, the players were surprised by Mourinho himself, who praised them on their answers.
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Via: Best Ads on TV

A review of the Science Museum's latest exhibition 'Our Lives in Data'

By Megin Gauntlett, Insight Executive
Being part of the *multiply team at Posterscope, we are more than comfortable with data as valuable currency. We pride ourselves on using the best, proprietary approaches to data in order to understand consumers better. This understanding in turn enables us to deliver the most targeted messaging, in the right moment and in the right location.
But what is the viewpoint of the consumer? How much do they actually know about the capture and use of their data? And when put in the consumer’s shoes, would you still think that the scores, reams and mountains of data collected and cleaned regarding your life is interesting or invasive? We can sometimes think about consumers as though they are different and separate to us and we must be careful that we don’t create a practice of dehumanising data.
We wanted to go to the Science Museum’s current exhibition, Our Lives in Data, to see their approach to education around data’s usage and how children, in particular, are shaping their views in a personalised, but essentially trackable, life.
Our Lives in Data was made up of four different sections; transport and smart cities, the IoT, genomic and social. The first and last are areas in which Posterscope have a large amount of experience. We use transport data every day in our work as Location Experts, defining how audiences move around the city in order to better understand how to reach them in the most relevant ways. We regularly use social data in our planning tools to see what is resonating for consumers, how they feel about brands and lifestyles and what they are gravitating towards in terms of behaviours.
The exhibition was set up as a blend of static exhibitions and interactive experiences. In the transport section, there was a data visualisation of Bond St Station showcasing how new tube stations and transit hubs are designed using predictive consumer data – knowing how people move through the station and streets surrounding it to enable city planners to create better, frictionless travel. This was interesting given Posterscope’s new partnership with Digit Group in the smart cities space. Using data to understand a location better and predict behaviours from a design perspective is only a decade or so old. But now, with connected payments, mobile signal data and the like, we can make the city work harder for its inhabitants.
Moving through into the IoT section, we saw connected toys showcased with variant degrees of consumer uptake – we have all heard the story of the doll that learned to speak not so kid-friendly words. This section also featured a type of paint that could be used on routers to block Wi-Fi signal pickups from external users. Considering Wi-Fi signals is a key method of understanding a location’s footfall at present, this paint was a surprise to some in the group. The exhibition also discussed whether consumers have been educated enough on the options available to them in this area when it comes to privacy of signals themselves (regardless of the fact the data collected is not being used to see individual information).
We then saw how genomic experts were using VR headsets to navigate their way through huge amounts of genetic data to better treat patients, even before they are sick. The exhibition talked around how the technology which began as a platform for better gaming has actually had a remarkable effect on how doctors and scientists can view microscopic and subatomic worlds. Given the complexity of educating children in genomic data, this area of the exhibition remained top line but it was a great way to show how a familiar technology like VR can be used to solve complex human issues.
Finally, we moved on to the social data area of the exhibition, with some very interesting facts for children and adults alike. For example, they shared that ‘Facebook users have four times the audience online than they estimate’ and that ‘within two weeks, 71% of people self-censor their own Facebook posts’. These statistics were interesting from a consumer perspective – we all know we self-edit but the fact it was post-rationalised editing showed how consumers are highly conscious about the image (and data) that they share with their ‘friends.’ The exhibition referred to ‘personality data’ or what we would call consumer trends.
There was an interactive element which replicated a basic planning tool – you could select which brands you like, and to what scale, and the tool would punch out a more personalised ad for you at the end. This is of course extremely pertinent to our world of dynamic adverts where Posterscope delivers relevant advertising content against specific audiences and mind-sets. It was surprising and exciting to see how the world of dynamic advertising was shown to kids and visitors, creating a positive connection and awareness around why ads were personalised to them.
Finally there was a video debate from the Policy Director of Facebook and Dr David Stillwell and he is a lecturer in Big Data Analytics at Cambridge University discussing data privacy and the future. Their conclusion was that consumers are demanding a personalised world with both brands and platforms understanding them and creating experiences with their individual preferences in mind. However, proceeding with caution was the message of the day – safe handling of data is the top priority.
In conclusion, visiting Our Lives in Data wasn’t about learning new data-trends, it was about understanding how the increasingly complex area of our business and the world going forward is being communicated to the younger generation. Brad Gilbert from the *multiply team said “the exhibition’s content may not have been new for us but it’s interesting to see an exhibition that explains simply to the public their data is captured and used. People are becoming more informed and empowered about the handling of their data, and it was important for us to see how this exhibition presented this to the public.’
Our Lives in Data captured the key areas of data in our daily lives, but it also enabled visitors to think about what would be missing in a world without data and the see-saw we all balance to improve our daily lives vs living an Orwellian existence. Given all the debate on this in our industry, it is important for us to remember that not all consumers are data experts but that we are all consumers.
Our Lives in Data is open until 01/09/2017 and you can find out more about the exhibition here.

Travellers Enjoy Samsonite’s New VR Game at Sydney Airport

Travellers are engaging with Samsonite’s new Virtual Reality (VR) game set in Paris while relaxing in the Sydney Qantas Club Lounge, as part of an activation to promote its new range of suitcases with Curv Technology.
Samsonite’s VR game immerses travellers into three Paris locations with Oculus Rift VR headsets and was designed by oOh!media’s experiential agency oOh! Edge as part of an activation created collaboratively with Posterscope and Dentsu Mitchell.
The game challenges players to find five Samsonite Curv suitcases as quickly as possible at famous Paris landmarks: the Eiffel Tower, the Louvre and the Arc de Triomphe.
Travellers who play the VR game are transported to Paris through 360 degree imagery and a piano accordion soundtrack, brought to life from oOh! Edge’s bespoke display units Connect, at Sydney’s Qantas Club Lounge.
Research shows Qantas club members spend around 42 minutes before their flight enjoying time in the Qantas Club Lounge, which provides an ideal environment for activations that engage more deeply with travellers who like premium products.
Dara Tang, National Marketing Manager at Samsonite, “As the leading global luggage brand, we wanted to interact and bring our brand identity to life with potential customers. This virtual reality game perfectly represents Samonite’s focus on innovation and cutting-edge technology,”
A Samsonite Curv luggage pack is being awarded to the top player each week. A major prize of a return trip to Paris for two and a Samsonite Curv Luggage pack will be awarded at the end of the activation.

Home improvement store brings highways to life in Peru's biggest ever VR experience

Sodimac, Peru’s largest home improvement chain, and McCann Lima have partnered to create the biggest VR experience ever produced in the country.
The “Hijacked Highway” is a 360-degree virtual-reality experience that will allow co-pilots and passengers in selected cars to ride along the Panamericana Sur, which is the country’s most travelled road in summer, to view the highway’s billboards in a unique way.
The VR initiative intervenes in specific spots throughout the Panamericana Sur landscape (between its 11th and 97th kilometers) and replaces the traditional billboards and visual clutter that drivers have to endure. The experience presents 3D animated images of Sodimac’s main summer offerings in funny and surprising forms, bringing to life their underlying idea, which is to show consumers that Sodimac is an expert when it comes to transforming and enhancing any space.
The campaign also explores an alternative media and guerilla-marketing strategy for Panamericana Sur, which is a highly-prized and expensive advertising arena during the summer season–ad placements on the billboards along the highway are the Peruvian equivalent of having a Super Bowl spot. The “Hijacked Highway” experience demonstrates how advertisers can compete for consumer attention with far less media investment, and in this case, adding a very powerful call to action.
Via: Best Ads on TV

Virtuality can be close to reality in Renault's "Drive the Future" VR experience

Renault took a VR-experience to a whole new level in it’s new campaign.
Passengers on a flight were given a VR-device through which they could see the ‘future’, of them disembarking the plane upon arrival, with some very unusual events occurring as they walked through the airport. They are hit by a boy playing with a ball and pass a woman in red on the travellator, before they get into the new Renault model and are taken on a rollercoaster ride.
When they actually get off the plane, then same events that occurred in the VR film, happened in real life, much to the confusion of the passengers, before being taken on a real Renault test drive.
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Via: Guerilla Blog
 

Norwegian launches virtual reality Boeing 787 Dreamliner flights at London pop-up

Low-cost airline Norwegian has teamed up with Boeing at Westfield Stratford City to launch a 5D virtual reality experience of the airline’s Boeing 787 Dreamliner on a virtual 15-minute transatlantic holiday in the USA!

Europe’s third largest low-cost carrier is already making affordable transatlantic travel a reality and is now giving visitors at Westfield Stratford the chance to win a holiday after experiencing a virtual reality flight created by VR production studio Visualise, on a Norwegian Boeing 787 Dreamliner to three-landmark US cities – New York, Los Angeles and Miami – all within 15 minutes.
MKTG has been responsible for all campaign creative and concept development, project management and production of the virtual reality filming and stand/set design, staffing, and insights and evaluation. Vizeum have been responsible for all media planning, including the Mail Online and Facebook partnerships.
By wearing virtual reality headsets, participants can experience 360-degree views, the sounds and motion of a Norwegian Boeing 787 Dreamliner flight in the economy and Premium cabins from the UK to the USA. By checking in, boarding the aircraft and landing in the US, participants will start their virtual USA holiday learning about key features of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner before being immersed in the vibrant, energetic scenes of New York, Los Angeles and Miami to entice potential holidaymakers to Norwegian’s low-cost transatlantic fares from £135.
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Norwegian is also encouraging participants to use #USAtheNorwegianWay on social media for participants to enter into a prize draw for the chance to win a holiday to any one of Norwegian’s eight USA destinations direct from London Gatwick. Shoppers and passerbys can also try out the virtual reality headset to view the Boeing flight experience.
Stine Steffensen Børke, VP Marketing at Norwegian said: “Norwegian has always been a trailblazer in technology with free Wi-Fi on all European flights and now we’re the first airline in the UK to offer a virtual reality USA holiday. As we continue to take off in the UK, we’re embarking upon the most eye-catching ways consumers can engage with our brand by demonstrating that low-cost can mean high quality in a truly fascinating way.”
The pop-up is now open until 14 December 2016 every day from 11am – 8pm, except Sunday, which is open from 12pm until 6pm, and is located at The Gallery in Westfield Stratford City.
The structure is hard to miss as it stands at 20m x 6.5m resembling a cross-section of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, which is the biggest event build ever at Westfield Stratford City.
Norwegian is growing rapidly with the UK’s only direct low-cost flights to the USA. The award-winning airline has launched more than 10 direct routes from the UK this year including three new routes to the USA – Boston, Oakland-San Francisco and Las Vegas.
From next year, Norwegian will be the first European airline to fly Boeing’s latest aircraft, the Boeing 737 MAX that will unlock never before seen routes.

JCDecaux Airport UK reveals Heathrow Airport VR exploration

JCDecaux Airport UK, with help from virtual reality specialists Visualise, have released a VR experience allowing users to explore Heathrow Airport in 360 degree video.
The work looks to hit home the scope and effectiveness of the advertising installations at the airport by offering a physical tour through the immersive medium of VR.
The content can be viewed on Samsung Gear VR headsets and JC Decaux’s YouTube page.
The activity was initiated to put potential clients in the shoes of the airport’s many commuters, all of whom are potential customers.
Alan Sullivan, managing director of JCDecaux Airport UK, said: “We are delighted to have worked with Visualise to produce such an innovative, ‘media-owner-first’ virtual experience.
The airport is a unique environment with key advertising benefits that can be extremely difficult to showcase in real life due to time and security restrictions at the airport. We can now make it possible for potential advertisers to understand the benefits in an impressive and impactful way without having to leave their office.”
Henry Stuart, founder and chief executive of Visualise added: “This project really showcases the power VR can have when it comes to marketing and advertising a project or service. We utilised a raft of technologies to deliver the experience required to really highlight the powerful message advertising in an airport can offer.”
The series takes viewers through check-in, departures and arrivals.
Video below:
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Via: The Drum 

CES 2016: Advertisers can expect more from immersive experiences and connected objects

Jeff Tan, VP Strategy Posterscope USA reports to Campaign Magazine
If there’s one thing that differentiated CES 2016 from other years, it is the scale. CES 2016 was by far the biggest to date; 180,000 attendees and 20,000 new products launched by 3,600 exhibitors.
For advertisers, the explosion of connected devices at this year’s CES shows the potential power of data mining at scale, which gives out-of-home advertisers more opportunity to develop rich, immersive and more personal experiences for consumers.
Here are just a few CES tech categories of particular relevance to advertisers:
Wearable technology
Wearable tech is a category that is exploding, with 20 per cent compound annual growth expected over the next five years. Often using a smartphone as a central intelligence hub, wearables are becoming more affordable, reliable and relevant.
Intel’s new Curie chip (named after Marie Curie) is a tiny processor the size of a button that’s cheap enough to be mass produced and embedded in just about any consumer item. Additionally, the Intel Memory Mirror is a device that could transform the instore shopping experience, letting consumers step in front of the mirror, see themselves in 360°, try on clothes, and see previous try-ons without having to redress.
Samsung demonstrated a new watch that doesn’t require a phone as it has its own connectivity, while other high-end smart wearables from Fossil, Swarovski and Tag Heuer also showed that wearable tech can be fashionable.
This boom in wearables means a major increase in richer data, which can improve both classic OOH and digital campaigns. Richer data delivers better results, and here at Posterscope we have seen spectacular increases of up to 200 per cent for brand KPIs vs. control areas.
Video recording devices?
Consumer recording devices are becoming cheaper, more mobile and better quality. GoPro disrupted Polaroid, and now Polaroid is disrupting GoPro.
The Polaroid Cube is a 35mm HD camera that is water proof, durable, high quality, light weight and can be mounted to almost anything.
Ricoh launched the Theta S 360 Camera the size of a small TV remote control that contains two fish eye cameras. Early adopters now have the ability to easily create 360° HD content.
These new devices could offer advertisers an amazing source of high quality user generated content that can be contextualised and curated for any screen including mobile, digital and OOH. Digital inventory and full motion DOOH is in a prime position to become a content platform in and of itself, both for brands to broadcast from and for users to contribute to.
Immersive experiences: VR and AR
New virtual reality and augmented reality products now offer brands and experiential marketers in particular the opportunity to provide truly immersive experiences for consumers.
At the lower end of the market, the Samsung Galaxy VR offers an affordable introduction to the world of VR. The Oculus Rift is finally launching this year, along with new products such as Leap Motion, and the augmented reality giants Magic Leap and Microsoft HoloLens.
This tech enables brands and experiential marketers to provide interactive, immersive storytelling. It’s already happening, for example, Posterscope’s experiential agency psLIVE used Oculus Rift at Waterloo station to transport commuters to the zip line and high wire courses at a newly opened Center Parcs in Woburn Forest, extending the impact of the wider ad campaign in a fun, enjoyable and tactile way.
Smart cars
Nine automotive OEMs exhibited at CES showcasing their range of semi-autonomous cars. Advertisers need to start regarding the car as another digital media format – a connected device for collecting behavioural data, and delivering information and media.
Smart displays with LTE connectivity and personalised content were a staple of the cars on display at CES.
Groupon and Chevrolet have partnered to provide Chevrolet drivers access to Groupon’s entire marketplace of location-specific deals available through OnStar, the brand’s navigation and connectivity service.
As cars begin to produce more data, advertisers will increasingly be able to increase personalisation and improve the targeting of campaigns, particular in roadside OOH.
Implications for advertisers
CES highlights three broad implications for the OOH industry. First, consumers are expecting high quality experiences everywhere, both in and out of home.
Advertisers need to continue to up their game with producing high quality, immersive, content-rich experiences, and VR is poised to become an important part of the OOH ecosystem by delivering quality consumer experiences.
Second, wearables will provide a bigger variety of data points that advertisers can tap into. Finally, digital media will not just be in the formats we’ve come to expect. Anything will be a digitally immersive experience, from cars to changing rooms.
Advertisers need to think beyond conventional formats and treat any connected device as an opportunity to connect with a human.
Jeff Tan is vice president of strategy for Posterscope
To read the article in Campaign click here

John Lewis Eyes Oculus Rift Opportunities to Unite VR and In-Store Experiences

John Lewis has started looking at what virtual reality (VR) technologies such as Oculus Rift could bring to the in-store experience.
Speaking at IAB Engage 2014 event in London, the retailer’s head of online marketing, Lloyd Page, revealed that it has started investigating the area predicting that “the VR and the in-store experience will collide”.
He said that it could be used in a situation where an in-store customer shopping within the furniture department can use the headset in order to visualise how it might look in their living room.
Page also discussed some initial ideas to have come out of the new partnership with iBeacon start-up Localz, which recently won £100,000 investment throughthe JLab scheme.
In the latest issue of The Drum magazine industry insiders debated the commercial opportunies for brands on virtual reality platfroms, revealing new advertising products they could potentially pitch to clients.
Via: The Drum