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Ocean announces judges for digital out-of-home competition

Rob Potts, an executive creative director at Saatchi & Saatchi, and Ross Neil, an executive creative director at WCRS, are among the creative and media execs on the judging panel for Ocean’s Art of Outdoor competition.
Presented in partnership with Campaign, the awards will honour the best creative work in digital out of home advertising, including full motion, subtle motion and interactive.
Other judges include: Emma de la Fosse, a chief creative officer EMEA, OgilvyOne; Matt Levers, a creative director at VCCP; Tom George, the chairman UK and Northern Europe at MEC; and the Campaign global editor-in-chief, Claire Beale.
James Copley, a managing partner at Talon; Stuart Taylor, the UK chief executive at Kinetic; Glen Wilson, the UK managing director of Posterscope; Chris Marjoram, the managing director of Rapport; Adrian Cotterill, the editor-in-chief, Daily DOOH; and the Ocean chief executive, Tim Bleakley, complete the panel.
Entrants will have the chance to win a share of a £450,000 prize pot and to showcase their work on Ocean’s premium digital sites across the UK.
This is the sixth year of the competition, which is free to enter. There are two categories for the best interactive and creative work.
The deadline for submissions is 28 August, and winners will be announced at an industry summit and awards held at the Imax in London on 8 October.
Richard Malton, the marketing director of Ocean, said: “Ocean’s competition has educated and inspired our industry and helped deliver the success story of digital out of home so far. It has always been our ethos to stimulate understanding and exploitation of the medium to the best possible effect.
“I am sure the 2015 competition will surprise and inspire in equal measure.”
For details on how to enter, visit the Ocean website.
Via: CampaignLive
 
 

Using OOH this Black Friday

As the UK prepares for the one of the biggest shopping days of the year, Posterscope‘s Glen Wilson looks at how retailers can use out-of-home to really reap the rewards.
Black Friday is the biggest online shopping day of the festive season. What started as a US phenomenon in which retailers across the country slashed prices the day after Thanksgiving, Black Friday was brought over to the UK by e-commerce giant Amazon in 2010.
Now firmly a fixture in the UK’s Christmas retail firmament, a recent report by Visa Europe forecast that British shoppers will spend more than £1 million every three minutes this year. That’s £360,000 every minute, or £6,000 every second, as consumers race to take advantage of the widespread discounts.
Given that UK consumers are set to exceed the £200 million spent on Black Friday last year, it’s understandable that retailers across the nation are keen to capitalise on the event this time around.
However, as easy as it is to get swept up in the Black Friday buzz, what’s really important for retailers is that the day kicks off a particular retail sales pattern that holds true until Christmas. It helps open up consumer wallets in a way that no other day of the year does, and if retailers are smart about how they advertise, they can ensure those wallets stay open right through to the New Year.
Nowadays everyone has a smartphone in their pocket, which means the landscape has changed for out-of-home advertisers. In November and December 2013, mobile sales reached 35.6 per cent of all online sales (tablets accounting for 22 per cent and smartphones 13.6 per cent). Mobile also accounted for almost half (47.3 per cent) of all online traffic (smartphones accounting for 25.2 per cent and tablets 22.1 per cent).
The rise in 3G and 4G, coupled with smartphone penetration reaching over 70 per cent of people in the UK, means there is little to no distinction in online or offline – consumers are now always on.
A recent study by Deloitte reveals that some 40 per cent of physical shop sales will be digitally influenced, meaning consumers will use some form of digital technology to inform or facilitate their purchase. As consumer connectedness increases, marketeers need their advertising to become more responsive to consumers’ needs, preferences and behaviour, especially during big events such as Black Friday where deals can be changed every few minutes. It’s an urgent day with limited time to make an impact.
However, planning for Black Friday and the Christmas period isn’t so much about real-time advertising than it is about “right-time” advertising. Mondays are often the most popular day for online sales, Saturdays for smartphone sales, weekdays are best for PC sales as people tend to buy things whilst they are at work, and evenings see the most tablet usage and therefore ultimately sales.
So advertisers looking to inspire online sales could offer specific online discounts for customers via out-of-home (OOH) on their commute to work on Monday mornings, or try and coax people into stores on Saturdays with location-specific deals.
Of course, real-time does still have a role to play. Where it can be most effective is in being used to influence particular types of sales at the best possible times of day, and helping retailers track a sale to better understand and influence the consumer’s path to purchase. In Black Friday terms, this could be tracked by the amount of people being influenced by the individual ‘limited time’ deals that are offered throughout the day.
For real-time to work properly it needs to be part of a strategy, and offers need to be informed by data to stimulate sales behaviour. Location, weather and social media data can all help advertisers tailor ads and placement via particular criteria, and can also help to tailor in store deals to make them both more personal and more relevant.
There are several big players involved in Black Friday in the UK space, including John Lewis, Asda and Amazon. Asda, owned by America’s biggest retailer Walmart, last year ran flash promotions within stores, leading to chaotic scenes as consumers rushed to pick up products for “earth shattering prices”.
Amazon this year announced it would be running deals from as early as Monday 24 November to build momentum and customer loyalty before D-Day, including discounts as high as £1,000 off cameras. John Lewis is said to be offering proactive deals, as opposed to price matching, for the first time ever.
There is a huge opportunity for OOH to help support campaigns like this in a more reactive way that better relates to the way in which people spend. OOH now has the infrastructure in place to produce more effective advertising campaigns than ever before, and no sales period is more measurable or more lucrative than the Christmas period Black Friday kicks off.
Data can inform smarter, better, more effective campaigns planned around how, when and where their target audience want to buy. By embracing the power of the new OOH infrastructure and the data that informs it to plan themselves around consumer behaviour, retailers can help ensure that their Black Friday activity kicks off their biggest Christmas ever.
Via: Media Tel

2015 Election Countdown: Will Ad Tech Help Revolutionise Campaigns?

Glen Wilson, Posterscope MD, discusses how digital out-of-home advertising platforms offer political parties the chance to tweak policy messages like never before.

With less than a year to go until the 2015 general election, and following Ukip’s win at the European elections, Britain’s political parties are already drawing battle lines. However, this time they are armed with the latest advertising technology. Just as Obama’s 2012 victory was boosted with social media, next year’s election will be fought with a world first: a powerful combination of real-time data and digital out-of-home (DOOH) advertising platforms. This means parties will gain the ability to react instantly to opponents’ announcements, dialling up campaign messages based on political polls or real-time social media sentiment analysis. This has the potential to revolutionise political campaigns, like we’ve never seen before.
Out-of-home (OOH) advertising has a long history in UK political campaigns, with billboards and posters featuring prominently in many UK elections. In 1979, the famous “Labour isn’t working” poster helped Margaret Thatcher achieve electoral victory and in 2001, Labour’s controversial mash-up of Margaret Thatcher and William Hague made headlines. In fact, OOH has become such a key part of election campaigns that political parties spent £7m on outdoor adverts in 2010, equivalent to nearly a third of total political ad spending.
Today, OOH remains one of the most popular and powerful political campaigning channels. This has been demonstrated in the run-up to the European parliamentary elections, with Ukip’s successful campaign and controversial national billboard poster campaign. Funded by businessman Paul Sykes, the campaign features a series of provocative statements about the European Union and the impact it is having on UK families.
With TV campaigning opportunities limited to the party debates, it’s unsurprising politicians choose to focus on OOH efforts. However, campaigners also recognise this method has the ability to reach a large audience where they spend a significant percentage of their time: out of their homes.
In the US, DOOH was hugely important during the 2012 elections. Digital signage and digital billboards were a significant component of political campaigning. For example, Mitt Romney’s campaign used digital billboards in states such as Florida and Colorado to coincide with Obama’s campaign rallies, while Obama’s campaign launched a digital advertising campaign throughout the DC Metro system to target voters in Northern Virginia. Rock The Vote, an organisation which aims to encourage young people to vote, also capitalised on DOOH during the election to raise awareness with young voters. Its “We Will” campaign, which aimed to defy voter suppression, incorporated digital billboards in high visibility areas.
With access to big data insights from polling information, together with the flexibility of using a digital screen, English political parties will be able to increase or decrease the severity of campaign messages depending on how they resonate with the public, and tweak policy messages depending on public sentiment. They’ll also be able to drill down into location-based data, which will provide parties with the flexibility to address specific local issues, and strengthen the campaign in areas where they might not be polling strongly enough.
There is no doubt this technology, powered by real-time information, has huge potential for British politicians. We will no doubt see ads that are more innovative and more targeted than ever before. I can’t wait.
Via: The Guardian

Outdoor Can Change the World

Posterscope hosted a workshop at AWE which discussed how ‘Outdoor Can Change the World’. The panel, chaired by Charles Vallance, chairman of VCCP, consisted of Glen Wilson, MD Posterscope, Michael Iskas, Global Chief Innovations Officer, Carat, Chris Gobby, Head of Data, EE and Theo Theodorou, GM EMEA, xAd Location Based Mobile.  
During the session Glen Wilson discussed how in the next five years half a billion pounds in revenue will shift into the OOH space.  He argued that OOH is one of the few media benefitting from the perfect storm of convergence and connected people, connected spaces and connected inventory. And that, how people behave in this OOH space and how they will be influenced by the huge technological changes, has the potential to become as powerful a communications phenomenon as that which we’ve witnessed online in recent years. Glen also discussed the impending rise of the mobile wallet, how people will be further empowered to react to and interact with content they encounter when they are out and about, the emergence of wearable tech, the importance of location based targeting, and data, and the increasingly symbiotic relationship between mobile and out-of-home.
Theo Theodorou then talked about the role of mobile and how it can be the enabler to drive interaction between physical OOH placements with digital interactions.  He discussed the need for greater education and understanding in the market around how location can be used, and how with location, mobile becomes a real-world cookie able to link OOH, the physical world, with the digital world to understand people’s behaviour and intent.  Theo also focussed on how mobile can start to provide some of the key answers to measurement, validation and ROI.
Chris Gobby continued the theme of data. For example, data showing where people shop on their mobile, which sites they visit before going to a shopping centre or sporting event, what people are doing in certain locations…and how that insight, in conjunction with other data sources, such as Route, along with the continued development of digital will really drive a step change in the way OOH is planned and optimised, and ultimately invested in. He concluded the mix of OOH, mobile and data will be the driving force behind increased revenue in the OOH industry.
Michael Iskas then took the floor with his view on what the OOH industry needs to do in order to generate the additional half billion revenue mooted. Michael focused on the need for innovation to change clients’ perception of the medium and what it can do for their businesses. He discussed the speed of culture and the speed of commerce, the need for real-time / right-time to deliver content that is relevant at the given moment to the given person in order to deliver increased equality metrics, and in particular the technological infrastructure, such as a real-time bidding platform (accessible to any company of any size) required to deliver this.
The workshop concluded with a Q&A session.
To hear the full session click here