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Posterscope round table discusses: How do we solve a problem like creativity?

Group photo  (back row, l-r) Gideon Spanier, head of media, Campaign; Stephen Whyte, CEO, Posterscope UK; Julian Linley, multimedia consultant; Barnaby Dawe, global chief marketing officer, Just Eat; Claire Beale, global editor-in-chief, Campaign; Helen Weisinger, chief client officer, Outdoor Plus; Glen Wilson, managing director, Posterscope UK; (front row, l-r) Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer, Ogilvy & Mather Group UK; Nicky Bullard, chairman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite; Rick Hirst, CEO, Carat UK; Justin Tindall, group chief creative officer, M&C Saatchi; Sir John Hegarty, founder, Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage; Robert Campbell, creative entrepreneur and founder of Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R; Katie Dulake, head of brand and marketing, TSB Bank

Marketers, creatives and media owners were invited by Posterscope to discuss out-of-home creativity. Campaign’s Stuart Derrick listened in.

You don’t have to press advertising folk or marketers too hard to come up with their favourite poster campaign. Whether it’s The Economist’s clever copy, British Airways’ “#lookup”, numerous eye-catching Nike ads, Araldite’s iconic stuck-on car poster, or any number of mood-shifting political campaigns, out-of-home packs a memorable punch.

Gideon Spanier, Campaign‘s head of media, who chaired the debate on the state of creativity in OOH, kicked off the conversation with the recognition that, while the £1bn sector is in rude health, with revenue up for the eighth year in a row, there remains a concern that not all marketers and creative agencies are still inspired to create engaging OOH creative.

Posterscope CEO Stephen Whyte said: “OOH has a long history of strong, impactful creative and, today, brands such as Apple are using it to great effect, but lately this has tended to be an exception rather than the norm.”

He asked what the challenge is for creative teams, and why they are not excited about the creative opportunity in OOH. “As an industry, we need to do more to champion the creative strengths of the medium. Seeing more powerful, engaging OOH will be the best way to motivate both agencies and clients to want and demand the best work for their brands.”

And creatives themselves still love OOH. Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer of Ogilvy & Mather Group UK, said: “When I trained, distilling the campaign message to four words on a 48-sheet was considered the skill of advertising. It’s what got me into the industry.”

With many evolving formats, the medium may have lost its essence by trying to be all things, according to Justin Tindall, group chief creative officer of M&C Saatchi. “It’s become a generalist in a world obsessed with specialists,” he added.
Barnaby Dawe, global chief marketing officer of Just Eat, appreciates the traditional marketing mix and the extreme measurability of pay-per-click in equal measure. OOH is one of his brand’s key advertising channels.

“The climate in which we operate, where the CEO and CFO want to see ROI, means that PPC becomes an unhealthy addiction, with its ability to demonstrate instant effectiveness,” he said. “Outdoor is up against both traditional broadcast media and also new media, such as carousel and canvas ads on Facebook. As a generalist marketer, I’m keen to show how effective a combination of both performance and outdoor media can be.”

Creative solutions
Creative legend Sir John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage, said the challenge faced by OOH is also manifest in the wider ad industry.

“A generation of marketing directors are failing to understand how to build powerful brands – they confuse persuasion and promotion,” he argued. “Focusing on just short-term promotional messages. They’ve lost faith in long-term brand building. Maybe it’s too difficult for them?”

In this environment, there has been a loss of bravery in committing to a medium that doesn’t have the rack of analytics of digital. “For clients who are driven by, and rewarded for, an almost instantaneous focus on results, it can be difficult to keep posters on the plan,” Rick Hirst, CEO of Carat UK, said.
Katie Dulake, head of brand and marketing at TSB Bank, added that OOH can play a different role. For a challenger brand, it provides reach. “Our brand purpose is bringing local banking back to the UK. It’s all about where people live and work, so OOH is great for that. It also supplements our physical brand presence – our branches – on the high street,” she said.

However, there was a feeling around the table that creative agencies don’t design for the medium. “A 48-sheet brief could have been career defining at one time,” said Claire Beale, global editor in chief of Campaign, who pondered whether creative directors still fought over them.

“We used to go out and look at poster sites to get an idea of context and where the message would be,” Robert Campbell, creative entrepreneur and co-founder of Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R, said. “People do not give it that time any more.”

Helen Weisinger, who recently joined Outdoor Plus as chief client officer from a creative agency background, said there was a knowledge gap in the market and education was the key. “Creative and measurement are the two areas where people don’t know what OOH can do yet,” she contended.

De la Fosse suggested specialist OOH media agencies and media owners should increasingly work with creative agencies to stimulate creatives and push boundaries, as was the case with Ogilvy & Mather’s “#lookup” campaign for British Airways.

Glen Wilson, managing director of Posterscope UK, suggested the industry might be lacking bravery, and that incentivising creativity either through reviewing the creative awards programmes for OOH or reducing the cost of inventory based on creative excellence might be the way forward.

Hegarty advised agencies to get back to basic principles and an understanding of how value is built.

“Technology enables opportunity, creativity creates value,” he said. “So, as posters increasingly become a digital offering, [they provide] creative opportunity and cultural importance. They should also embrace wall painting. Call it Craft Advertising. Think how famous Banksy became from his wall art.”

The consensus was that, rather than focus on what posters can and can’t do, there is a need to focus on deliverables and objectives – to get back to what OOH does best and change the conversation to highlight that this is a medium where creativity can flourish.

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“Apple’s ‘Shot on iPhone’ is one of the best poster campaigns of the last three years. I don’t care how many pixels the camera has. If it takes pictures like that, I want it”

– Sir John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage

 

“If you can’t tell the story on a poster, it’s not a story worth telling”

– Nicky Bullard, chairman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite

 

“Data and technology present a great opportunity for DOOH but we shouldn’t ignore the scale, creative opportunity and fame-building strength the medium provides”

– Stephen Whyte, CEO, Posterscope

 “There’s pushback against clickbait to focus on quality content that speaks directly to an audience. It’s hard to gain attention through the noise online, but posters can cut through by virtue of being more environmental”

– Julian Linley, multimedia consultant

The full article on Campaign Live can be read here

Primesight Unveils its Largest Ever Digital Roadside Screens

Coca-Cola, Vodafone and Sky are among some of the first brands to advertise on Primesight’s first digital 96-sheet roadside panels.
The 10 new screens – the largest out-of-home format – will join 52 existing D48-sheets and form part of Primesight’s wider strategy to reach 100 digital roadside sites by the end of the year.
The latest additions are expected to give an ‘audience impact’ of almost 9.5 million, with Mondelez, BMW, Eurostar and British Airways also on board at launch.
“We’re thrilled to be building on last year’s success in rolling out Network with this new D96 panel, the largest and most ambitious format of its kind,” said CEO Naren Patel.
“Primesight is focused on offering a broader array of DOOH solutions to help drive the market forward and offer even bigger, more creative and dynamic solutions for clients.”
Vanessa Eagle, business director at Posterscope, said: “In this dynamic and evolving media market, the continuous development of new digital products makes OOH an exciting area for advertisers to invest.
“Our clients demand more flexibility, more contextual advertising and more opportunity to innovate and cut through. Large Format Digital OOH sites such as the Primesight Digital 96s deliver on these demands and we are delighted to work with Primesight for the launch of their new national packs.”
The news comes as Primesight takes control of Manchester Airports Group’s ad contract for the next five years, which covers four UK airports at Manchester, London Stansted, East Midlands and Bournemouth.
Via: MediaTel

Posterscope Win Connected Agency of the Year at Mediatel Connected Consumer Awards

Today, 5th May, Posterscope won Connected Agency of the Year at the Mediatel Connected Consumer Awards.
Known as ‘The Connies’, the awards are held in celebration of those pioneering new advertising, technological and commercial opportunities in the connected industry.
Aimed at organisations that are devising and powering connected strategies, the shortlist represents a wide variety of media focused businesses – including media owners, agencies, consultancies and technology providers.
Posterscope had also been shortlisted in the ‘Best Research Project or Initiative’ category with their insight project ‘Dynamic Differences’ as well as Connected Agency of the year, alongside Carat UK.

DOOH will be the Fastest Growing Media Channel

Inspiring. Exciting. Versatile. Just three the emotions adland associates with digital Out of Home which is predicted to grow faster than mobile and video on demand over the next five years.
Two hundred and four executives drawn from both media agencies and the outdoor specialists sector responded to a study commissioned by premium digital out of home media owner Ocean to gauge the role, prospects and challenges for digital out of home in the current media landscape.
Key findings of the study:

  • DOOH is consider the Number 1 medium and is predicted to have the biggest growth in the next 5 years
  • DOOH is perceived as a tech-driven medium, closely aligned with online and mobile. It’s also described as the most innovative, creative and flexible medium in the market.
  • Executives differentiate DOOH from its competitors as being more sophisticated, exciting and inspiring

A substantial 86.3% study respondents identified digital Out of Home as having the biggest growth potential over the next five years, putting the medium ahead of mobile (67.2%), video on demand (60.8%) and every other media channel.
Digital Out of Home also scored higher than any other media channel for offering dynamic (83%), exciting (69%) modern (82%) and versatile (67%) advertising environments.
“The emotional index in our study shows how far DOOH has moved from the being a standard, passive medium to a channel which is modern, exciting and sophisticated, driving mobile and online,” said Ocean marketing group director Richard Malton.
“This shift in positioning is driven by technology like audience recognition, wifi and broadcast capability, which allows us to introduce even better targeting, interactions, creativity and results. The introduction of new trading models is also driving flexibility and value as never before.”
The study allows Ocean to create three specific media clusters;

  • Potential – DOOH, mobile, online, video on demand
  • Classic – radio, press and static out of home
  • Influential – TV, magazines and cinema

Cost and flexibility were two issues highlighted by survey respondents as issues to be addressed.
“DOOH needs to educate and prove to the industry it is audience, content and cost driven, “ said Richard Malton. “Automated planning and trading environments like Signature’s The Loop is a significant step towards achieving the necessary transparency and flexibility.”
Via: Outsmart 

What My Mentors Taught Me

Top tips from Frances Dickens, chief executive and co-founder of media barter specialist Astus Group.
I expect my experience of school is similar to that of a lot of business people who have succeeded in their careers despite, rather than because of, formal education. I also expect like me that their teachers played less of a role in shaping their work ethic and values than the handful of key colleagues who noticed their potential, encouraged them to excel and bollocked them if they didn’t.
The role of mentors in the workplace is a perennial topic and I am a big fan of formal mentoring schemes such US-based Million Women Mentors and WISE here in the UK which both aim to push female talent in STEM (Science Technology Engineering and Maths) sectors from classroom to boardroom.
My own career has been focussed on the media industry, initially as account handler for billboard company More O’Ferrall and currently as chief executive of Astus Group, the UK’s largest media barter company, where I oversee a team of 35 and a business turnover of £132.2m in 2013. In terms of my career trajectory, there are two women who helped ensure I confounded my teachers’ expectations and whom I’d regard as mentors: Annie Rickard, chief executive of outdoor specialist Posterscope and Christine Walker, former chief executive of Zenith Media and latterly joint MD of Walker Media. I met Annie when she hired me to work at outdoor specialist Harrison Salison which later became Posterscope. Christine and I worked together on the board of out of home specialists Meridian Outdoor, the joint venture between Posterscope and Zenith Optimedia.
Here are five key lessons my mentors taught me:
1. Preparation is key
Going into a meeting with Annie or Christine was a terrifying prospect IF you hadn’t prepared, as both are absolute perfectionists. On the board of Meridian Outdoor they were often both present at meetings and I quickly learned to anticipate the questions they were going to ask ahead of time and to ensure any documents I was handing out featured meticulous spelling and grammar. On the plus side, I learnt that if I argued my case really well they were prepared to listen and go with my recommendations.
2. Always deliver on your promises
One of the founding principles of Astus Group is that we only take on deals we are sure we can deliver against. This is a lesson I learned from Annie and Christine for whom delivery on business promises is almost an article of faith. Both women inspired tremendous client loyalty because of their track record of coming through for clients. Following their example has served me well at Astus where our insistence on meeting client expectation means we have repeat business levels of more than 95%.
3. Keep calm and carry on
Christine and Annie have experience of leading multimillion pound companies and both have fairly formidable reputations usually perpetuated by people who haven’t actually met them. The bottom line is that you’ve got to be tough if you’re leading a company -people’s livelihoods and careers depend on you making cool, calm decisions. Christine and Annie are both very calm under pressure. Come to think of it I’ve met way more panicky blokes at the top than panicky women.
4. Lead by example
As my boss at Posterscope, Annie taught be everything I know about account handling. One thing I particularly admire about her, and which I have tried to make a part of my own leadership style, is that she would never ask her staff to do anything she hadn’t or wouldn’t do herself. What’s more if the task was in anyway tough, she would be there doing it with you. Both Annie and Christine had a very open door policy and again an open working culture is one of the cornerstones of my own business.
5. Give people you trust a chance
Annie and Christine are great at empowering people who they perceive to have potential by giving them more responsibility. This explains how I came to be on the board of Meridian Outdoor. When I started Astus, Christine gave me a chance to prove that media barter worked despite having a very bad experience of media barter as it was practised at the time. I really admire her for being prepared to put her misgivings to one side and listen to how my company was going to change the existing discredited business model by focussing on delivery first. When the time was right she allowed me to talk to her clients about media barter and when they agreed to try it out we made sure we exceeded their expectations.
Via: Huffington Post

OOH Follows TV as 'Most Trustworthy' Medium

Consumers rate out-of-home as the next most trustworthy medium to TV, according to a new study.
The research, carried out by Future Foundation for FEPE International, revealed that 28% of consumers find television advertising ‘most trustworthy’, followed by 24% for OOH and 22% for press. Conversely, just 3% find online advertising the most trustworthy medium.
When asked which types of advertising are the most memorable, 46% of the 1,000 respondents from the UK, Germany, Spain, Turkey, Brazil and South Africa, voted for TV, 34% OOH and 7% press. Similarly, online scored a low 4%.
The research also revealed that half of urban consumers agree with the statement, ‘I like it when I see advertisements for products I already own,’ increasing to 54% for those aged 18-34.
The ‘post-purchase reassurance’ effect was particularly marked in technology products, which the report says highlights that OOH is a “trusted ad medium.”
Commenting on the research, FEPE International’s executive director, John Ellery, said: “We’re all aware of the power of TV and the growth of online advertising. But this major research study shows that out-of-home is a major force in the digital age as it is so highly valued by consumers.
“The growth of digital outdoor and NFC technology that allows consumers to interact with digital posters will only accelerate this trend.”
Via: Media Tel

Dentsu Aegis Network Shops Back Vizeum's Camelot Win

Vizeum will draw on other agencies and divisions in Dentsu Aegis Network to service the Camelot media account.
Camelot, the operator of The National Lottery, awarded its £40 million planning and buying business to Vizeum last week.The win is the biggest in the agency’s history, ahead of the £34 million 20th Century Fox account it picked up in 2007.
Dentsu Aegis Network divisions that will work with Camelot include the outdoor agency Posterscope, the search specialist iProspect, the measurement and marketing effectiveness unit Data2­Decisions, the investment arm Amplifi and the insight panel Consumer Connections System.
Vizeum landed the account after beating OMD in a final shoot-out. The business was previously shared by OMD, which handled buying, and Havas Media, which worked on planning.
The process managed by Oystercatchers.
Via: MediaWeek

A New Perspective on ROI in OOH

The Outdoor Media Centre recently hosted an informative session on the drivers of Return on Investment in media, highlighting the importance of branding and reach to long term brand equity. Les Binet of Adam & Eve/DDB outlined a thorough perspective on ad effectiveness and where OOH fits in, based on his latest IPA publication, The Long and The Short of It. He highlighted a very different effect between Long Term Branding and Short Term Activation. We would agree with the need to value Long Term branding more as it does contribute more fully to sales effects over time.  Some clear conclusions emerged:
1. Longer term advertising delivers better payback; but ideally you need a combination of both
2. OOH and TV excel at brand building and stand apart from other channels
3. The best way to drive fame and saliency is reach. Reach is even more important than loyalty in driving sales and profitability. “Using OOH doubles the chance of achieving brand fame and therefore sales and profitability”
4. Emotional messages prime our decision-making
The work sits comfortably alongside the latest ROI data released by JCDecaux around its Tesco Smartscreen launch (significant effects of digital POS activity, particularly by daypart and if animated) work presented at the OMC Outdoor Works conference in 2013 and the recent impact of innovation activity for Pepsi, PS4 and others driving enhanced digital brand engagement.
Via: Outdoor Media Centre

Read All About it on Paper Towels

To drive more people to its website, Mexican free newspaper Mas Por Mas rigged some paper towel dispensers to print out the latest real-time news.
Working together with agency FCB Mexico, they installed printers inside selected paper towel dispensers, and connected them via WiFi to the paper’s daily newsfeed.
Each time the dispensers detected a person’s hand, they would print out the latest news on the paper towels. Using special powered ink, the printed news won’t leave any stains on the person’s hands.
On each print-out is also a QR code that directs people to the newspaper’s website. According to the video below, the campaign was a success; unique visitors to the website increased by 37% in the first two weeks.
[youtube width=”300px” height=”200px”]sfjFgFYBEmA[/youtube]
Via: Design Taxi

Digital OOH Media Exposure Up 75%

Digital out-of-home media exposure surged 75% between 2007 and 2013, second only to mobile, according to new research from PQ Media.
As the global media economy nears a digital tipping point, PQ Media’s latest ‘Consumer Exposure to DOOH’ global report suggests that DOOH media may be on the verge of an industry breakout, with the average global consumer exposed to various DOOH media for 14 minutes per week in 2013 compared with eight minutes in 2007.
According to PQ Media, growth has been driven by consumers spending a record amount of time with media outside their homes, increased engagement during the day with corresponding content on DOOH screens that are linked to wireless devices, longer work commutes and consistent growth in leisure travel and shopping hours.
The data also indicates that improved designs, content, interactivity and ‘mobile couponing’ are extending dwell time with screens.
By 2017, PQ Media expects DOOH exposure to increase at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 8.6% to 20 minutes on average per week, while traditional OOH revenues are expected to rise at a 4.1% CAGR.
Via: MediaTel