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Company Sent 6,000 Bags of Green Tea to Trump to ‘Purify’ his Mind

An Indian company decided to play a prank on Donald Trump — by sending him 6,000 bags of green tea.
In a video on YouTube, two women with the company TE-A-ME Tea took the giant box of green tea to Trump Tower to deliver to the Republican presidential candidate.
“Dear Mr. Trump, namaste from India, we are sending you lots and lots of natural green tea,” TE-A-ME said in the video. “It fights against harmful free radicals. It helps purify mind and body and regain a healthy balance. It has also proven to make people smarter. Please Mr. Trump, drink the tea. For your sake, for America’s sake, for the world’s sake.”

Green tea does have numerous health benefits, including preventing heart-related issues, lowering cholesterol and aiding the memory, according to WebMD.
The company told Buzzfeed they could only leave the box of tea with Secret Service and couldn’t take it to Trump personally. They included a note that promised the supply should last through four years of Trump’s possible presidency, but they would be happy to supply more if he needed it. With 6,000 bags of tea over four years, Trump could have four cups of green tea per day.
The company called the delivery “Trumping Donald, a TE-A-ME Intervention.”
“We can’t stop him, but maybe we can change him,” the video states.

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Vote Leave Bus Promoting NHS Budget “lies” Hijacked by Greenpeace

The ‘Vote Leave’ EU battle-bus, which featured the claim that leaving the EU could boost the NHS by £350m a week, has been hired by Greenpeace in a smart stunt to recapture media and public attention. The “lies” about EU funding will be replaced with demands for the “truth”in the stunt outside Parliament.

The bus is being covered with thousands of messages for the new Government, asking members of the public to make suggestions.
Via: PR examples 

2015 Election Countdown: Will Ad Tech Help Revolutionise Campaigns?

Glen Wilson, Posterscope MD, discusses how digital out-of-home advertising platforms offer political parties the chance to tweak policy messages like never before.

With less than a year to go until the 2015 general election, and following Ukip’s win at the European elections, Britain’s political parties are already drawing battle lines. However, this time they are armed with the latest advertising technology. Just as Obama’s 2012 victory was boosted with social media, next year’s election will be fought with a world first: a powerful combination of real-time data and digital out-of-home (DOOH) advertising platforms. This means parties will gain the ability to react instantly to opponents’ announcements, dialling up campaign messages based on political polls or real-time social media sentiment analysis. This has the potential to revolutionise political campaigns, like we’ve never seen before.
Out-of-home (OOH) advertising has a long history in UK political campaigns, with billboards and posters featuring prominently in many UK elections. In 1979, the famous “Labour isn’t working” poster helped Margaret Thatcher achieve electoral victory and in 2001, Labour’s controversial mash-up of Margaret Thatcher and William Hague made headlines. In fact, OOH has become such a key part of election campaigns that political parties spent £7m on outdoor adverts in 2010, equivalent to nearly a third of total political ad spending.
Today, OOH remains one of the most popular and powerful political campaigning channels. This has been demonstrated in the run-up to the European parliamentary elections, with Ukip’s successful campaign and controversial national billboard poster campaign. Funded by businessman Paul Sykes, the campaign features a series of provocative statements about the European Union and the impact it is having on UK families.
With TV campaigning opportunities limited to the party debates, it’s unsurprising politicians choose to focus on OOH efforts. However, campaigners also recognise this method has the ability to reach a large audience where they spend a significant percentage of their time: out of their homes.
In the US, DOOH was hugely important during the 2012 elections. Digital signage and digital billboards were a significant component of political campaigning. For example, Mitt Romney’s campaign used digital billboards in states such as Florida and Colorado to coincide with Obama’s campaign rallies, while Obama’s campaign launched a digital advertising campaign throughout the DC Metro system to target voters in Northern Virginia. Rock The Vote, an organisation which aims to encourage young people to vote, also capitalised on DOOH during the election to raise awareness with young voters. Its “We Will” campaign, which aimed to defy voter suppression, incorporated digital billboards in high visibility areas.
With access to big data insights from polling information, together with the flexibility of using a digital screen, English political parties will be able to increase or decrease the severity of campaign messages depending on how they resonate with the public, and tweak policy messages depending on public sentiment. They’ll also be able to drill down into location-based data, which will provide parties with the flexibility to address specific local issues, and strengthen the campaign in areas where they might not be polling strongly enough.
There is no doubt this technology, powered by real-time information, has huge potential for British politicians. We will no doubt see ads that are more innovative and more targeted than ever before. I can’t wait.
Via: The Guardian