Posts

Engagement uplift for Stena Line by adding a programmatic mobile campaign to Out of Home

In cooperation with Isobar and Amnet Posterscope Netherlands created an Out of Home awareness campaign combined with an online mobile 360° ad for ferry company Stena Line. Combining Out of Home with a location-driven mobile campaign and a mobile audience creates an uplift with more impact and engagement. By using a programmatic strategy, the best of both mediatypes is optimally utilized to reach the target group on the biggest and the smallest advertising screen at the same time.
From Goal to Strategy
With their core business on the holiday market, visibility just before the high season with a focus on branding and awareness were the main campaign goals. To translate this into a strategy Stena Line wanted to be visible from the end of May until July because during this period most potential clients get inspired and book their holidays. Until the end of July, the campaign will be exposed on digital highway billboards, big screens at subway/train stations and on mobile with a 360° ad.
Cross channel boosting effect
For this campaign Out of home was the perfect medium to create awareness and generate exposure. The use of digital screens totally suited the campaign goals of Stena Line. To add an extra campaign layer, the programmatic trading desk Amnet purchased a mobile campaign based on geofencing (proximity) and a pre-defined audience. Therefore, they used gps-locations with a focus around train stations. The digital Out of Home screens were exposed on working days and during the weekends between 16:00 and 19:00. Whenever passersby were near a train station they both got to see the ad on the Out of Home screen and on their smartphone. To give this ad an extra brand experience Isobar created a rich media ad with the use 360°.
From insights to effectiveness
By using a mobile strategy and data it’s possible to provide insights on the effectiveness of the Out of Home campaign. It gives us the opportunity to define the number of clicks and the engagement by location. Overall the combination of Out of Home and Mobile enchances target group insights based on POI’s. We can also retrace passersby who interacted with the Out of Home object, which gives us the possibility to optimize the next campaign. This proofs that Out of Home and Mobile are the ingredients for a success formula and for creating a campaign uplift.
  
Credits
 Client:                                    Stena Line, Mariel Korpel, Stefan van Beek
Out of Home specialist:      Posterscope, Bas van den Hoogen, Roos Groesz
Experience design:              Isobar, Melvin van Gom
Programmatic:                     Amnet, Frank Meiland, Guido van Oosten
Media owners:                     CS Digital Media, Interbest, Ngage Media, OOHA media

Programmatic OOH's strength lies in content, canvas and context- by Glen Wilson

For a legacy medium like out-of-home, there are a number of crucial factors to consider when gearing up for an automated future, writes Posterscope’s MD, Glen Wilson
Digital out-of-home (DOOH) is increasingly being used in more flexible, dynamic ways and integrating more and more varied data sources, consequently allowing us to display ever more relevant content to audiences.
As a result of these advancements, programmatic OOH capabilities are accelerating at pace now too. You can’t go far without reading or hearing about OOH programmatic at the moment, both in the UK and across the globe.
We have seen announcements recently from a number of media owners launching programmatic capabilities, and I think these developments will only continue to intensify in the coming months.
But while all these media owners have announced tangible, exciting and significant developments, with substantial resource and investment behind them, there are still differing views about what programmatic means for the OOH medium, and perhaps more importantly, the benefits it will offer to advertisers.
As programmatic media developed alongside the digital and mobile media model, the programmatic transactional element adapted simultaneously to become automated.
There are several considerations to automate that transactional element for a legacy medium like OOH, not least taking into account physical inventory. Therefore Programmatic OOH is being defined in many different ways and it is yet to be determined which trading model will ultimately win out – Programmatic Guaranteed, Private Marketplace or RTB/Open Exchange.
Running alongside the debate over transactional models is the planning opportunities that programmatic can provide. As media owners invest in API systems that match real-time availability with data sources this will certainly enable faster, more efficient planning by specialists and agencies. Almost all the major OOH players in the UK are working to deliver this to some extent in 2017.
For the Posterscope team, however, the most exciting and important aspect of programmatic OOH is the transformation that automated ad-serving of creative has enabled. The ability to tailor content based on real-time data optimisation is potentially the biggest single step forward for the OOH medium in decades.
Numerous studies have shown that the more relevant and contextual an advertising message is, the more it resonates with an audience. This is particularly true for OOH, where a consumer’s location, state-of-mind and purpose plays an immensely influential role.
Key findings from Theoretical VirtuoCity Research in the effectiveness of this “dynamic difference” revealed that ad-serving relevant content by audience increases the overall effectiveness of a campaign by +15%.
Furthermore, we know this makes a difference to a brand’s interaction with their audience. The research from VirtuoCity also revealed that using dynamic DOOH to deliver a more contextually relevant message increases advertising awareness by 18%, recall of the specific creative messages by 53% and creative/brand perceptions by 11%.
We’ve seen huge investment in digital screens in the past few years and by leveraging the agility and flexibility of these increasingly digital networks, we can utilise real-time planning to deliver pieces of communication automatically, in a given time or place, driven by pre-programmed rules.
Additionally we have the increased ability to ad-serve and optimise creative delivery with messages that contain dynamic elements and, informed by data, reflect more closely what audiences are thinking, feeling and doing at those moments.
We are already serving creative content that adapts to multiple, real-time feeds, such as weather, traffic flow, sales, social media trends and a multitude of other business drivers, via the Liveposter platform, along with creative content drawn from pre-produced work or created and edited in real time in response to these data triggers.
Unfortunately this dynamic capability is far from being used to its full potential and is currently the award-winning work of the few rather than the many.
More than the new types of trading models, it is this customisable aspect of OOH programmatic that is capable of transforming the creative potential of the medium, attracting new advertisers to it, building its overall share of media spend and, most importantly, delivering dramatically more effective campaigns.
This is this is where the OOH industry needs to focus, communicating this world of possibility to advertisers and the agencies that represent them.
Via: MediaTel
 

Posterscope Taiwan look to develop programmatic solution

Posterscope Taiwan and Dentsu Aegis Network committed to develop OOH industry in the region and believed that is one of the keys to efficiently integrate media planning and buying is the development of programmatic system.
In the process of this development, Posterscope Taiwan and Dentsu Aegis Network are working with key partners to develop a series of tests.
Rebecca Chang, general manager of Posterscope Taiwan, said, “Global OOH media is moving toward OOH 4.0 which includes three perspectives: consumer measurement, procurement evolution and innovation content. In response to digital trends, Posterscope will dedicate to integrating industry resource, in order to enable future customers predict, trace and measure their business activity in OOH media to achieve the goal of an industrial upgrade. In cooperation with the group brand Amnet, Posterscope would be able to utilize programmatic buying solution to purchase the platform resources to help customers accurately deliver advertisement, as well as more transparent and efficient procurement.”
Read More ….

Posterscope builds proprietary ‘always-ready’ programmatic ad-serving platform for Shop Direct

Posterscope will, for the first time, activate a bespoke, ‘always ready’ ad-serving platform for Shop Direct.
The platform will be powered by Liveposter and at scale through a partnership with Clear Channel, giving Shop Direct brands Very, Very Exclusive and Littlewoods a consistent brand presence on high streets across the UK until the end of 2017.
OOH is the perfect media channel for Shop Direct, a pureplay etailer, as it acts as an extension of the brand and a shop window.
Shop Direct will have the flexibility to schedule or launch real-team dynamic, digital out-of-home (DOOH) campaigns, and tailored creative executions, optimised by time, location and audience, to support specific product or price promotions.
The always-on platform launches this week and will deliver better media buying value for Shop Direct. Creative is produced by St Luke’s and media is planned in collaboration with Vizeum.
The announcement follows the recent launch of Posterscope’s programmatic ad-serving offering, Dynamic Audience, which gives all clients access to programmatic ad-serving whereby all digital campaigns can be optimised hourly by location to the audience using a sophisticated AI algorithm.
Andrew Roscoe, Head of Brand, Sponsorship and Celebrity at Shop Direct, said: “As a retailer it’s crucial that we have the flexibility to respond and adapt our advertising to changing market and consumer demands. The technological developments emerging in digital out-of-home are facilitating this. The bespoke platform that Posterscope has built for us will allow us to activate brand-led and product specific campaigns in an agile way and ensure that our advertising is relevant and as appealing as possible at all times.”
Posterscope’s Senior Client Manager, Anishka Fernando, said: “Shop Direct has been a pioneer in digital OOH, taking full advantage of new opportunities to reach consumers in a more personalised and relevant way, activating real-time, data-led campaigns and using customised creative optimisation to improve the effectiveness of its campaigns. We are really excited to be collaborating in this way to help Shop Direct continue to push the boundaries and remain agile and relevant in the market.”
Eleanor Mitchell, Client Director at Vizeum, added: “Digital OOH is a great place for the Shop Direct’s brands to be as it creates a virtual shop window on the high street. This technology platform will allow us to take full advantage of the dynamic capabilities of the medium and we are excited to be part of this industry first.”
Via: Marketing Communication News
 

Posterscope deploys AI to help brands optimise their OOH

Posterscope has added an AI-powered feature to its programmatic platform that will allow advertisers to optimise out-of-home advertising on an hourly basis.

“Dynamic Scheduling”, powered by Liveposter, uses a “genetic algorithm” which makes it possible for the programmatic platform to efficiently compare millions of locations, and their hourly audiences, to identify how to best schedule content.
“The most interesting and important aspect of programmatic OOH is the transformation that programmatic ad-serving of creative has enabled,” Stephen Whyte, chief executive of Posterscope, said.
The AI algorithm makes the benefits of programmatic ad-servicing accessible to all advertisers, regardless of campaign scale, he added.
The new platform launched this week with campaigns by Santander, in partnership with Carat and Engine, and Charlotte Tilbury, in partnership with Cream.

The Santander campaign is built around the premise that consumers should “Feel good about planing for the future”, Daniel Creed, lead media strategist at Santander, said. “But we recognise that prosperity means something different to everyone depending on their personal situation.

“Dynamic Scheduling allows us to communicate our different product offerings based on what is most important to those viewing the campaign,” he added.

Via: Campaign Live
 

6 Nations viewers found the right pub at the right time with a little help from Guinness

For this year’s RBS 6 Nations, Guinness ran a locally targeted, dynamic Out-of-Home campaign that celebrated the brand’s status as the official beer of the tournament.
Devised by Carat and Posterscope and deployed on JCDecaux’s LDN network, the campaign sought to capture the attention of Guinness fans and direct to them to pubs nearby where they could watch England battle to claim the Grand Slam whilst enjoying a pint of the much loved pub favourite.
The campaign’s dynamic creative element was automatically ad-served as a match approached to provide kick off times and distance to nearby pubs screening the live match (run through Liveposter).  A network of sensors fitted in participating pubs captured footfall data and, based on capacity levels, triggered real-time, tailored creative executions to cleverly drive fans to the best venues to watch the game.
Elliot Duncan, Guinness Marketing Manager Europe, said: “Guinness is a beer Made of More so we wanted an OOH campaign for the RBS 6 Nations that would embody this and provide more relevant content for our fans and pub partners. This campaign gave audiences upcoming match information and also let’s passers-by know where there was an available seat nearby to catch the game accompanied by a pint of the official beer of the tournament.”
Alexandra Porritt, Client Manager at Posterscope said: “This campaign used location-marketing expertise to programmatically ad-serve relevant creative to audiences: using footfall data, location and geo-targeting, and dynamic creative to provide useful information to fans, in an engaging way, at the right time and in the right place.”
Via: JCDecaux 
 

Can programmatic trading revolutionise OOH?

Above: Stefan Lameire, Cadi Jones, William Eccleshare, and Justin Cochrane, Clear Channel UK CEO
More outdoor owners may follow Clear Channel’s move to launch an in-house platform as digital screens have already transformed out-of-home, allowing brands to tailor creative by time of day and location, and driving up revenues for media owners.

With digital approaching 50% of the UK OOH market by revenue, the industry is betting that programmatic trading can further push up sales by encouraging automation and more efficient buying.

Clear Channel will roll out its programmatic platform in the UK in March. Initially, it will only feature inventory from its premium digital OOH offering, Storm, which has screens in 30 locations. But it will be followed by the addition of nearly 6,000 DOOH sites.

The platform lets media buyers book inventory on an automated basis at a fixed price. Eventually, Clear Channel hopes to make all of its trades via the programmatic platform.

“Programmatic has completely changed the way we sell and how the medium is bought,” William Eccleshare, chairman and chief executive of Clear Channel International, says, describing the platform as the company’s “big bet on the future”.

Rubicon Project partnered Bitposter to launch a programmatic marketplace for OOH inventory in the UK in 2015 and Kinetic introduced its programmatic offering in 2016. However, neither has made a substantial impact on the market so far.

“Without denigrating the efforts others have made, I don’t think anyone has done it [OOH programmatic trading and deployment] in any kind of scale,” Eccleshare says. “What’s being done is automated trading. This is more than that.”

Clear Channel claims its platform is “truly programmatic” because it is a fully transparent, automated system that will allow buyers to monitor price,inventory and performance. This, and the desire to control full intellectual property rights, was behind the company’s decision to invest in its own platform.

Eccleshare admits Clear Channel, like others, has come under pressure to introduce programmatic to DOOH as it becomes the norm in other sectors. About 70% of online media was traded programmatically in the UK in 2016, according to Zenith.

“It makes our medium easier to buy,” Eccleshare says, “and we, as a media owner, must embrace anything that removes barriers to purchase.”

However, one of the great attractions of OOH is its broad reach at a time when audiences for other media are fragmenting. There may be limits to how much brands want to use programmatic to micro-target their messaging.

Glen- programmaticVia: Campaign Live

Stephen Whyte on how programmatic is transforming the creative potential of OOH

The least talked about but most interesting component of programmatic OOH is the transformation that automated ad-serving brings, writes Posterscope’s CEO.
Programmatic out-of-home has been discussed and written about a great deal in recent years and Clear Channel’s plans to accelerate the trading automation of its digital inventory will obviously fuel expectations and discussion further.
However, there are conflicting views about what programmatic could mean for this medium, how it might work and, most importantly, what the benefits to advertisers might be.
In many of the debates, I think that the most important and exciting aspect of programmatic OOH often gets overlooked. Probably because the obvious comparison is programmatic online, discussion tends to focus on the automation of transactions and which model – Programmatic Guaranteed, Private Marketplace or RTB/Open Exchange – is likely to emerge and prevail.
In my view, the answer to this in the short to medium term is Programmatic Guaranteed with each media owner pre-defining pricing by client. This is what Clear Channel announced last week.

In order for a truly biddable market to be established, audience trading metrics and protocols would have to be standardised and agreed across all media owners and agencies.
That’s not likely to be achieved any time soon although the UK is better-placed thanks to Route data than many international markets.
Furthermore, each media owner would have to establish a complex set of pricing rules for their inventory and transfer pricing control from their long-established sales teams and methodologies to a technology platform.
The online advertising market never had this legacy trading approach to overcome, but the cultural shift required for many OOH businesses will be significant.
Close behind the debates about transactional models come the planning opportunities. The provision of real time availability data APIs by media owners will undoubtedly enable faster, more efficient planning by specialists and agencies and almost all the major OOH players in the UK are working to deliver this to some extent in 2017.
But, for me, the least talked about but most interesting component of programmatic OOH is the transformation that automated ad-serving brings. As William Eccleshare noted in his Clear Channel presentation last week, the massive investment in digital screens that the industry has made over recent years has yet to be matched by the dramatic leap in the creative use of the medium that the investment enables.
In addition to being able to buy digital OOH in incredibly focused, targeted and flexible ways, it’s already possible (via platforms like Liveposter), to serve creative content that adapts to multiple, real-time data feeds.
These feeds can be anything from weather to traffic flows, sales, social media trends and other business drivers. Messages can be optimised by target audience subset, by location, by time and day. Advertising content can be drawn from a pool of pre-produced creative work or can be created and edited in real time, in response to relevant data triggers in any and every site location.
In a recent campaign we ran for a client, over 10,000 different creative executions were programmatically served over a two-week national campaign. This highly dynamic use of digital OOH is arguably the biggest single step forward for the OOH medium in decades.
The growth of digital screens in all their shapes and sizes is important and significant but the real power comes from the programmatic ad-serving technology that is available to deliver content to those screens.
It is this aspect of OOH programmatic that is capable of transforming the creative potential of the medium, of attracting new advertisers to it, of building its overall share of media spend and, most importantly, of delivering dramatically more effective campaigns.
And this, far more than the programmatic trading models, is what advertisers and the agencies that represent them should focus on more.
Via: Campaign Live

10 Resolutions for Outdoor Advertisers: Nick Halas talks to MediaTel

From making better use of data to learning more about audiences through AI, Posterscope’s Nick Halas says there are 10 things the OOH sector should focus on this year.
Outdoor advertising is evolving faster than ever before. Never has new technology been driving such massive change, not only in how we display ads, but also in how we plan campaigns.
Out-of-home (OOH) is still able to reach audiences at scale as the proliferation of digital infrastructure, planned using big data, now gives advertisers the added opportunity for personalisation and relevance.
People nowadays expect services, in particular communications, to be more tailored to what they are, what they’re doing and what they’re thinking. Unsurprisingly, doing this with OOH tends to drive better outcomes and we are starting to build up a robust body of evidence that validates this.
We’ve found this to be equally true for classic OOH as well as digital. To take full advantage of everything that OOH can offer though, advertisers will need to be sure to stick to a number of commitments, or resolutions if you will:

  1. Make better use of data

Consumers increasingly expect services or messages to be tailored to their personal tastes and preferences. Real-time triggers such as weather and traffic data enable OOH ads to react to the world around them, while mobile data helps advertisers understand the sites and apps people use in particular locations.
Advertisers can now even use social media data to plan campaigns around where relevant conversations are taking place, as demonstrated in a recent campaign we worked on for the hit video game Fallout 4. Advertisers in 2016 need to be using data to increase personalisation and deliver the right message, at the right time, in the right location.

  1. Start treating OOH as the new shop window

The speed and nature of service and brand communication are changing. Starbucks coffee can be pre-ordered before you arrive, so that it’s ready to go, and everything from an Amazon Prime package to a pack of Oreos can be delivered to customers’ desks within an hour.
As customers continue to make orders before being near stores, advertisers need to be treating OOH as they would a shop window, enabling it to act as a real-time trigger for customer appetites.

  1. Get to know programmatic at scale

Programmatic is expected to hit 60 per cent of UK digital billings this year. As the ‘automation of media bookings’ capabilities of programmatic increasingly become the norm in OOH, advertisers need to ensure that as well as faster, more accurate and accountable delivery, solutions also deliver scale.
Platforms need to plug in to digital ‘screen-buying’, which will enable DOOH to have a wider purchase point and syndication into other digital-led screen planning and buying.

  1. Consider digital inventory as a content platform

Brands are increasingly using content-focused social apps like Periscope and Snapchat to communicate with consumers. Adidas is streaming footballers’ practices live, while Red Bull is live-streaming Miami music week events.
Digital inventory and full motion DOOH is in a prime position to become a content platform in and of itself, both for brands to broadcast from and for users to contribute to. We’ve already started to see examples of user-generated content being used, such as Apple’s ‘Shot on iPhone 6’ and Three’s #HolidaySpam campaigns.

  1. Get around ad blockers

As consumers continue to reject advertising across multiple mediums, the increasing threat of ad blockers is causing concern throughout the digital industry. OOH, though, is a medium that can’t be turned off, so advertisers should be considering putting much more emphasis on the medium.
Increasing digital OOH inventory means OOH agencies now need to align closer than ever with digital agencies to provide the strongest possible integration.

  1. Encourage consumers to pay by OOH

2015 saw a huge rise in contactless and mobile payments and advertisers can harness the continued increase in mobile and contactless payments by encouraging a new, larger scale of innovation across the OOH landscape.
Doing so could transform from primarily being a ‘brand awareness’ driver to instead drive real-time purchases. We’ve already seen innovative examples like Clear Channel’s use of contactless totems earlier this year, where consumers were encouraged to tap their card to donate money to Cancer Research UK.

  1. Better measure experiential projects

As the growth in ad blockers shows, consumers are ignoring disruptive advertising that doesn’t provide something valuable to them. As a result experiential campaigns are set to become even more prevalent.
However, the crucial resolution for 2016 is about measurement. Advertisers need to make use of new analytics platforms to better understand the impact of experiential activities by tracking consumer engagement through CRM and their navigation through an event space.

  1. Learn more about OOH audiences with artificial intelligence (AI)

Earlier this year, Posterscope worked with M&C Saatchi and Clear Channel to launch the world’s first AI ad campaign, which rewrote its creative in real-time according to how people reacted to it.
AI provides a new canvas for advertisers to use to learn about consumers and behaviours in a different way. This New Year, advertisers should look to how AI can create stronger location targeting, and how it can increase the relevance of messaging and imagery based on audiences’ real-time emotional engagement.

  1. Make better use of beacons

2016 is set to see OOH become a key driver of beacon usage. Increasingly, beacons will be housed within billboards, and outdoor advertisers should be striving to make better use of beacons to realise hyperlocal campaigns like one we conducted for Pimms last summer.
Using a beacon network and digital out-of-home screens, the number of smartphones at nearby pubs were counted, and used to create a live feed of this data to show consumers where they could still grab an empty seat to enjoy a glass of Pimms.

  1. Consider societal benefits as well as commercial

People are no longer just buying a product, they are buying into the brand and its corporate values as well.
Increasingly agencies will help advertisers make their budgets work harder to create truly innovative media firsts that not only serve advertisers’ interests, but contribute positively to the society they exist within to impact everything from the provision of public infrastructure to live experiences.
That’s just for starters though. Sticking to resolutions is a hard, but crucial task. However, to stay ahead of the game the OOH industry needs to not only meet the above resolutions, but to constantly make new resolutions throughout the year. If they do, they might stand a chance of 2016 being their best ever year.
Nick Halas is head of futures at Posterscope
To see the article in MediaTel click here
 

Advertising Week 2015 NYC: Attendees from Posterscope UK and USA give their views

Advertising Week 2015 NYC: Targeting the Micro-Moment, Programmatic Planning and a Cross Dressing Robot
By Samantha Brereton, Client Director, Posterscope UK
It’s Monday morning and Times Square is buzzing – but this time it is not just filled with tourists. thousands flock to the many events in the area for the start of Advertising Week USA. AdWeek USA proves Americans don’t do things by halves – it’s like AdWeek Europe on steroids. Now in its 12th year, it operates as a well-oiled machine as brands vie for the attention of marketers with freebies, parties and even job offers (check out MECs ‘Live Hire’ event). Almost four times the attendance of AdWeek Europe and nearly 1,000 speakers make up the eclectic and highly entertaining four day schedule.
Although the programme is busier than its European counterpart, the hot topics and buzz words draw close parallels to our market. Unsurprisingly, the big tech companies start the week with new announcements. Google launched Customer Match which offers advertisers the ability to upload email lists of valuable customers and have these matched to consumers who are signed in to Google platforms such as Gmail, YouTube and Search. This is all part of Googles aim to target “consumers in the micro-moment”. YouTube also announced it would make all ads shoppable and Facebook have launched a new buying platform of TRPs (Target Ratings Points) which aims to make it easier for TV buyers to plan, buy and measure Facebook ads.
What does this mean for OOH? Google knows better than most the value of relevance and personalisation and this is a move to create deeper connections with consumers in the right moment. With 60% of internet time being spent on mobile in the UK this ‘moment’ could very well be happening OOH. New OOH data and mobile partnerships as well as real time DOOH capabilities allow us to tap into this micro-moment like never before. We should closely monitor how the consumer responds to and interacts with this type of personalisation to ensure we can find the right balance to capitalise on this with OOH media. As quoted by Alex Amado, VP of Experience Marketing for Adobe “It’s creepy when you feel like you’ve been targeted–when it’s aggressively personalized is when it’s not of use to the user.” So with OOH we must ensure we create personalisation in a positive way. Utilising the mobile interface is one way to have a one to one conversation with consumers while they are OOH.
YouTube’s push towards shoppable ads across the board is a nod to consumer’s expectations for immediacy. OOH and Mobile get closer to the point of purchase than any other media and shoppable OOH ads are very much possible today. With the proliferation of contactless technology this is only likely to increase in the coming year. New technology will allow us to speed up the process from consideration to purchase with OOH media and therefore could be an area to watch for retail clients.
Facebooks launch of TRP buying seems to be an aggressive move to target lucrative TV budgets. TV spend is still higher that Digital in the US and thus provides a golden opportunity for Facebook to increase profits. In the UK, digital will this year reach over 50% of all ad spend and digital providers will continue to target traditional media budgets. Is this a threat to OOH? I think quite the opposite. £65 million is being invested by OOH media owners into DOOH this year and networks are becoming increasingly sophisticated. Its highly likely cross platform/media digital approaches will become much more prevalent moving forward and the OOH industry is in a strong position to take advantage of this.
Content and Data were once again huge areas of focus across the four days, but given they are so well documented, I decided to focus my attention on two alternative areas of interest. The first, which is timely for the UK OOH market, is programmatic. The second is just really cool, albeit scary; artificial intelligence:
Programmatic:
A whole three day schedule of events the ’OMAA Programmatic Display’ was dedicated to exploring the future of programmatic under the headline topic: From Automation To Storytelling: Solving For Display. Programmatic is a huge focus in the USA and there is a real push to extend this beyond the realms of online into more traditional formats such as TV and OOH. Although in its infancy, OOH and TV are already traded programmatically in the US and budgets allocated to this area are set to grow hugely across the board. With the addition of new media in the programmatic space the need for greater cross platform integration rises. There was much debate over whether omnichannel planning is the way forward and although still a fair way off becoming the norm, the general consensus was that type of approach will be needed in the future. As we are on the cusp of launching programmatic OOH in the UK, lessons from the USA point to the crucial need for collaboration with this movement to be spearheaded by OOH and digital specialists alike. OOH planners need to quickly equip ourselves with the skills and knowledge required to earn a seat at the programmatic table.
 Artificial Intelligence (AI):
The final area of focus, and probably the most interesting was a talk from Yasuharu Sasaki, Executive Creative Director at Dentsu entitled “Will AI Disrupt Creativity Produced by Humans?” Many have predicted when the singularity will come. Some say 2030, some 2045 – either way, the thought that AI will surpass the human brain is worrying! In an industry where creativity and innovation is what we do, Sasaki’s hypothesising on whether our jobs will still be needed, or whether human creativity will become redundant had the rooms attention. The good news is, Sasaki predicts human creativity will still very much be needed in the future. But it comes with a warning – robots will soon become incredibly powerful and will be able to learn human creativity so they will likely beat our ‘mediocre’ ideas. But so long as we up our game and strengthen our creativity we will be needed long into the future – after all only human creativity can create new innovations.
Denstu are developing some fascinating AI projects in Japan including Pepper, a robot whose sole purpose is it communicate with and entertain humans and can be purchased for a mere £1,050. Pepper has been bought for personal use as well as commercial becoming the world’s first robot to work in a Tokyo Bank. They have also created a number of products for marketing purposes. Matsukoroid was an AI robot ‘double’ created to look and behave exactly like a famous cross dressing talk show host in Japan. At a cost of around £55k to produce, this stunt created huge amounts of PR and an impressive ROI. IBM Watsons ‘Chef Watson is another example of marketing related AI where the supercomputer learns and creates crazy recipes that the human brain may never have thought of – like chocolate sushi.
So what does this mean for OOH? Posterscope are already exploring AI in posters in the UK with a recent launch of a DOOH site that could learn and adapt to human responses – this allows for greater efficiencies in serving relevant content. But what next? Dentsu are exploring the emotional side of AI and this is something that could have fascinating applications in media. In a time where connecting with the consumer on a personal level is something many marketers are striving for, could we build AI into digital screens or experiential events that could actually interact with consumers on an emotional level giving them a positive but completely individual experience? This is all technically possible today but the question is whether UK consumers are ready for this type of innovation?
My final thought: Advertising Week has just announced the launch of Advertising Week Asia 2016. The UK are years behind Asia when it comes to adopting these types of technologies but it won’t be long until some of the ‘less crazy’ ones appear on our shores. I predict AdWeek Asia will be a conference like no other – where you will see these new technologies and their applications to media first hand. If you are lucky enough to get to AdWeek Asia I’m confident it will blow your mind!
New York Advertising Week : by  Louise Coshan, Supervisor, Account Manager, Posterscope USA
After my taster of Advertising Week earlier this year in London, I was eager to get my name on the list to attend as many events as I could in New York. Having moved to this great City in June, it still surprises me how much of a brands media spend is portioned to OOH advertising in the USA with the medium often being viewed as secondary to the likes of TV, Digital and Print.  We recently saw a YOY increase to OOH media spend, so is this set to change?  With that in mind, I was intrigued to see the trending topics of discussion and what this could mean for OOH planning and buying going forward.
The week kicked off with a splash of red, white & black from the OAAA (Outdoor Advertising Association of America) with the launch of their campaign, ‘Feel the Real’.  This was used to target media agencies and planners, whilst making a larger call to the public to engage with the real world.  As well as championing OOH as a real medium that reaches real people to drive significant digital engagement, it was also challenging the media industry to think about ‘How real is digital?’  This campaign demonstrates the impact that OOH sites can have to create engagement and complement digital marketing, especially the growing mobile market.  A great conversation starter for the week ahead, I think.
As we move into the era of ‘audience buying’, understanding a brands audience has become more and more important for all media budgets need to be accountable.  Carat’s insight and in-depth study on ‘The Millennial Disconnect: If you’re Not Winning with Millennials, You’re Just Not Winning’ definitely inspired and made me think how the innovation that is continually evolving within the OOH space could create great opportunities for brands to engage with this hard-to-reach audience.
Carat’s research showed how marketers’ current strategies only effectively reaches 42% of this group, so the “hyper-connected, optimistic, digital extrovert” stereotype that has been associated with all Millennials isn’t the whole picture.
They highlighted that although media and tech has shaped this audience there are several segments that form this audience.  So digital is not the only way this audience want to be spoken to.  We have moved from that Mad Men age, where people trusted a brands message to a time where people work harder than advertising.
We now trust people and their conversation and enjoy being part of it. DOOH now allows brands to broadcast a consumer’s comments and brand experience through photos or social media conversation, and also update a screen through a Live Feed.  This is a great way to build trust through conversation and understand this key audience more and should be a consideration for brands going forward.
While we are on the subject of segmenting audiences, Programmatic was a topic that could not be missed over advertising Week calendar. The OMMA (Online Marketing Media and Advertising) held a 3 day advertising week event dedicated to the subject. The first panel I attended was ‘People, Not Pages: What Does “Buying Audiences” Mean for Media and Marketers?’
This discussion focused on the fact advertisers are now looking to find and buy audiences, data and programmatic technologies and allow this approach to targeting.  Online has always been a strong medium for audience buying.  But, with the access now to more data being heavily supported by mobile, we move to a time where ‘Location is the new cookie’.
With OOH buying being extremely location driven, this is an exciting time to be looking at OOH and DOOH buying as the market begins to evolve and move towards a more flexibility.  This will of course make a time of change for media buyers, planners and owners. But, it’s something all parties will have to embrace to allow OOH to keep up with consumer behavior and their relationship with brands.
Posterscope’s CEO, Helma Larkin, joined the discussion for ‘Automating the Next Frontier’ which focused on Programmatic buying capabilities across multiple platforms.  Programmatic OOH buying is being pioneered by Posterscope at the moment, and we are already seeing brands add multiple touch points to their media plan considering the target audience and timing for a brands messaging.
As well as reaching the right audience at the right time through media placement, creativity will also need to be a part of this to ensure we are adding to the consumer experience making the message as timely and contextual as the media buy. The subject of ‘Ad Blocking’ was a big part of this conversation and the need for a mix of strong creativity and media placement.
If the content delivered is relevant enough, will consumers block brands or welcome their content? Following the Millennial insights that Carat shared the later certainly seems the case and more context will lead to a more trusted market place for consumers.  It seems that there could be certain segments such as the tech savvy millennials that would ‘Ad block’ making it difficult for online to reach these audiences?  Could this be where OOH is considered for brands to cut through the cluttered market and help make digital media become ‘real’ to achieve more effective brand messaging.
John Montgomery, Chairman GroupM, led the discussion for ‘The Rise of the Audience.’  He looked at the future of a market being driven by both digital platforms and a data and how it is moving away from buying just media but audience.  It terms of how this will work for clients and media in the future, Programmatic really is about making the media work harder to deliver the message to the audience.  It shouldn’t be thought of as saving money but fitting into the clients business. There will be some brands that will need to build audience delivery over time still.
My final session at Adweek that I was blown away by, was some of the new technologies and projects that Yasuharu Sasaki, Executive Creative Director at Dentsu shared in his seminar on “Will AI Disrupt Creativity Produced by Humans?”  From seeing Pepper, a Robot that can guess how humans are feeling and responds to emotions based on gestures, to a complete robot replica of a TV Presenter that helped to build their fame and became a celebrity in their own right.
This session left me thinking, ‘what is the art of communication going to evolve to?’ What was once the future, is almost here where screens can deliver a personalized message – ‘Minority Report Style.’ But, is that really what consumers want to see?  Thankfully, Yasuharu did leave me with some reassurance by summing up his discussion with communication. I couldn’t agree more. Having recently been given the great opportunity to move to New York from the UK, I’ve realized now more than ever how important quality-daily communication is to me.
Technology has completely supported my move, allowing me to stay in touch with loved ones in the UK via many platforms.  So, as we wrap up Advertising Week NYC in the traditional media way of enjoying a cocktail at Soho House amongst the chatter of real, face to face, conversation (maybe a social media post to share my activities was involved!). I’m left with the thought, ‘if we can get the mix of data, how we use technology and content as good as my Gin & Tonic, I’m sure we’ll have a happy party of people trusting and enjoying a brand’s conversation.

Portfolio Items