Can Media Campaigns Perform 13% Better?

Often I wake up thinking, ‘wouldn’t it be great if my integrated campaigns could perform 13% better!’
If you are often asking yourself the same question, Carat Insight’s ICE (Integrated Communications Evaluation) study has the answers.
ICE is an award-winning methodology designed to understand the impact of individual campaigns and activations. ICE provides marketers with the understanding of what different media channels contribute to integrated campaigns. The research also takes into account all touchpoints a consumer has with a brand and identifies other influences such as brand experiences and competitor activity.
Here at Posterscope, we’re always trying to improve our understanding of how out-of-home (OOH) contributes to campaigns, and how it impacts and influences people. This is because the more we understand how people view, react to and identify with OOH campaigns, the better we know where to deliver ads they’re going to love, so that we can drive a real benefit for our clients.
Posterscope commissioned Carat Insight to conduct a database analysis of all individual ICE studies ever run to generate universal insights about OOH’s role within integrated campaigns. This was a five-year study that analysed 50 individual integrated media campaigns across this time period. The study tested more than 1,500 different creative executions, and surveyed a substantial sample group of more than 20,000 respondents to find out how these ads drive purchase intent. The campaigns were real life executions for clients including Phillips, British Gas, Lurpak and Kellogg’s.
The study told us a great deal about where OOH sits in the wider media mix, and how it influences and is influenced by other media channels, but the big reveals were all about the effect it has on people.
In particular, the study showed that campaigns with OOH perform 13 per cent better than those without. A great finding for OOH, this insight illustrating OOH’s impact on purchase intent, measured the extent to which someone is moved to make a purchase after seeing an ad.
Now an argument could easily be made that the kind of campaigns that use OOH are usually allocated a larger budget and therefore are in a better position to improve media performance. However, the ICE study takes this into account, removing the media budget bias by bringing campaigns that feature OOH and those without to the same starting point.
We also learnt a great deal about what drives purchase intent. OOH was found to have a major influence on interpersonal relations – which is the emotional connection people feel with a brand on a personal level. When looking across the media mix, OOH was found to proportionately impact interpersonal relations more than any other media channel at 45 per cent.
Across the five year period, this emotional connection people feel for brands was found to be the most important driver of purchase intent, accounting for an average of 44 per cent. We also found that its importance is growing, it improved by 14 per cent over 4 years.
The two emotional connections that the ICE study found OOH impacted the most was trust and relevance. As a broadcast medium, with large stature sites that are viewed in the public space, it makes sense that OOH instils trust. Relevance to consumers comes from the way OOH is planned to maximise its ability to reach consumers in the right place, time and mind-set.
 
OOH’s advantages extend beyond delivering trust and relevance. ICE rated the impact of creative on all media formats and OOH was found to have 3 out of top 10 most impactful creatives. 2 of these were on broadcast, large format OOH sites, relating to the findings on trust above,  whilst one was a very small advert in a doctors surgery, illustrating that if OOH is contextually planned, it also delivers effective relevance.
These insights will enable us to further improve the service we provide for our clients and is great news for the wider industry.
Harriet Swinburn – Posterscope