Posts

Open canvas: creative you just can't ignore (December 2017)

Two experts pick their favourite out of home campaigns and explain why their chosen work makes the most of the medium

Paul Jordan, co-executive creative director, Mcgarrybowen


Sometimes we just need to recognise the power of the product and the platform, then get the hell out of the way.I love love love the Coca-Cola screens illuminating Piccadilly Circus right now.
I won’t call them ads, because they’re not. Not really. Not ads in the way we think of them – jaw-dropping headlines and traffic-jamming visuals.
No, these screens do something much simpler. Much more effective. They instantly make me want to buy a Coke. And I’m a cynical old adman who doesn’t particularly like Coke.
Picture it. A chilly Wednesday night. Stepping out of a restaurant at the bottom of Regent Street. Hugging a friend goodbye and BLAM! There it was, over his shoulder. A gigantic, slow-motion Coke cap flying off a bottle; that brown fizzy stuff gloriously cascading into a glass. I couldn’t work it out. Full up on London’s finest dining and now all I could think was “I want a Coke.”
Was it nostalgia for the red and white of the world’s most iconic brand? The warm glow lighting up a cold night? All I know is that, some-how, this combination of logos and pack shots worked its magic on me and raced straight to my amygdala as if I’d just necked a can of the stuff.
There was no smart wordplay or visual trickery and that was its strength. When we write ads for OOH we have this rule; nine words or less for a headline. But I don’t think these Coke ads even have words. They’re that simple; that impactful.
And that’s the point. A 4K screen the size of a tennis court gives you impact. Lighting up Piccadilly Circus gives you impact. The red and white of the world’s most famous brand has impact.
Sometimes we just need to recognise the power of the product and the platform, then get the hell out of the way.
Apple gets this. Those posters wrapping whole office buildings with the latest iPhone on them aren’t really ads either, but they work in the same way. I want what they’re selling. But you can only get away with this in large-format OOH – anywhere else, any smaller, and it’s just a bit boring.

Sarah Hardcastle, creative, Mr President


In the age of the smartphone it’s easy to only see the things we want to see. From newsfeeds that show us only the stuff we like to clicking ‘skip’ on YouTube, consumers have never had more control over messages that are shared with them.But what about the messages nobody wants to see – or, worse, can’t see at all?
In Finland, 25,000 cases of domestic violence are reported to the police every year. That’s 70 acts of violence a day, with 88% taking place after dark, out of sight, unnoticed.
It’s this alarming statistic that sits behind the thinking of this reactive campaign for the Helsinki Police department, a partnership between JCDecaux and TBWA.
Using location data collected when a report is made, they were able to target the 15 closest OOH units to the crime with a powerful poster campaign the very next day. The posters at first appear to be straightforward ads for a kitchen or beauty brand but, once night falls, a black-light transforms the image to reveal the disturbing truth taking place behind closed doors.
This hyper-local approach meant that the neighbours of victims would be faced with the stark reality of the problem on their own street, making the messaging “You can’t hide the signs of violence” all the more poignant by placing it in spots that are hard to ignore.
The beauty and impact of this idea is in using targeted OOH, as by its very nature it can’t be skipped, scrolled past or blocked. It’s a smart strategy that plays on the medium’s strengths in a bold, reactive way, made all the more effective when combined with the eye-catching creative.
At Mr President, we’re firm believers in bring-ing media and creative together like this, and I can imagine how implementing the idea into digital OOH could make it even more powerful, (for example) by incorporating street names or even the number of calls made in that location.
Many brands are using the technology in this way already – British Airways with its “#lookup” activity, for one. But however it evolves, I hope this campaign continues to become more and more impactful – until it won’t be needed at all.
Open Canvas V5

Via: Campaign 

Creative experts line up to judge digital out of home contest

Anna Carpen, executive creative director at 18 Feet & Rising, Aaron Goldring, executive creative director at Partners Andrews Aldridge and Neil Richardson, creative director at Leo Burnett will be joining the judging line-up for the out of home Digital Creative Competition run by Ocean Outdoor, in partnership with Campaign.
A 16-strong panel will select the best digital OOH ideas for campaigns that Ocean can bring to life on its screens in the UK or via The Alliance network in Madrid, New York and the Far East (Hong Kong).
Brands, agencies and creative teams have until September 8th to enter the free competition with a chance to share in the prize fund of £650,000 in media space. Winners winners will be announced at a ceremony at the IMAX in London on October 5th.
The full 2017 judging panel is:  Claire Beale, editor-in chief of Campaign; Gill Reid, board director, out of home, Mediacom; Glen Wilson, managing director of Posterscope; Stuart Taylor CEO of Kinetic; Chris Marjoram, managing director of of rapport; Andy Tilley, managing partner and chief strategy officer of Talon; Gareth Orr, head of OMD Create; Bill Moss, director of brand ventures and mall retail at Europe Westfield; Robin Behling, chairman of Feref;  Sophia Amin director of PR and communications at IAB UK; Adrian Cotterill, editor-in-chief of Daily DOOH; Vasiliki Arvaniti, portfolio manager of Land Securities; and Ocean CEO Tim Bleakley.
Bleakley said: “Ocean invests in this competition to draw a new wave of global creative talent to the table, evolve the opportunities open to brands and to ensure that we market and implement every creative concept to the highest possible standards. Entering the competition is simple, but the rewards are multiple. And all you need to compete is a bold idea.”
Via: Campaignlive

Starbucks Malaysia got their customers to design their new billboards- without them realising it

The next time you need some inspiration, take a page from Starbucks Malaysia’s playbook.
The coffee chain recently unveiled a series of new billboards all around the Klang Valley.
Here’s the cool thing about them: the billboards were designed by their customers – and they didn’t even know about it!
Over the course of a weekend in May, Starbucks Malaysia invited customers to showcase their creativity through their community art project called The Art of Expression.
Held in conjunction with Starbucks’ summer campaign called “Show Your Flavor”, the Art of Expression project allows Malaysians from all walks of life to express themselves through colours and art.


On 20th May, Starbucks Malaysia placed eight blank canvases at selected outlets nationwide.
Customers who visited the stores were invited to leave their mark on the canvases – either by painting a picture, leaving a message or plainly just splash some colours on the sheet of paper.

According to Starbucks Malaysia, they wanted Malaysians from all walks of life to ‘show their flavour’ and showcase their artistic talents on these canvases.
So, all the colours, drawings and doodles you see on the billboard are “a genuine expression from the young to the old”, Starbucks added.

Little did they know, Starbucks Malaysia had a plan for these canvases.
After the event, they set out to enhance the vibrant artworks into massive billboards. The individual canvases were combined into a giant masterpiece and showcased on billboards for all Malaysians to view!

Via: Rojak Daily
 

Ocean Outdoor seeks bold ideas for the 8th annual Digital Creative Competition

Ocean has launched its 8th annual competition to discover the best creative ideas in DOOH, using innovative and emerging technology and techniques.
Ocean’s Digital Creative Competition is now inviting submissions for bold new creative ideas which set new boundaries from brands, the creative community, agencies and charities.
Campaigns can be devised for either UK audiences, or to reach much broader global audiences spanning three continents (Europe, North America and Asia).
This year, to encourage simple and effective creativity, there’s a single category of entry, although submissions for charities and commercial brands will be judged and awarded separately by a panel of industry experts.
Entrants that truly raise the bar will win a share of a £650,000 prize fund and the chance for their creative concepts to be showcased across Ocean’s iconic UK DOOH locations, or via The Alliance network to Europe (Madrid), the USA, the Middle East (Dubai) and the Far East (Hong Kong or China).
Announcing the 2017 awards, Ocean CEO Tim Bleakley said: “Ocean’s annual competition has consistently challenged creative thinking within the all screen market, consistently raising the bar for what is possible over the past eight years.
“It has provided a platform for brands to succeed at global awards ceremonies such as the distinguished Cannes Lions, delivering inspired ideas and aligning creative minds to the opportunities digital out of home affords alongside other progressive platforms and content channels.
“Last year’s winners created some show-stopping media moments on a UK and an international scale. Entering the competition is simple but the rewards are multiple. All you need to compete is an idea.”
It is free to enter Ocean’s competition, which is open until August 25. The winners will be announced at a prestigious awards ceremony at the IMAX in London on October 5.
All you need is an idea
In 2017, Ocean celebrates the 8th anniversary of a competition that has consistently educated and helped drive the DOOH success story. The initiative reflects Ocean’s ethos to stimulate technical understanding and creative exploitation of the medium and with it, drive sector growth and brand count.
Last year’s winners included Churchill Car Insurance with Churchie’s Drive-Thru created by WCRS and the spectacular March for Giants, created by 18 Feet & Rising for the charity Space for Giants.
Eight years of supreme creativity
Ocean’s competition has powered global success stories for visionary brands and agencies who have shown the world how DOOH is closely aligned with other progressive technologies in the screen world and fully integrated with capabilities such as wifi, augmented reality, 3D modelling and audience and vehicle recognition.
March for Giants transcended global boundaries broadcasting across three continents via The Alliance
Gold Cannes Lions for Women’s Aid’s Look at Me and MicroLoan’s Pennies for Life campaigns
Top Shop and Twitter presented catwalk trends live as they happened from London Fashion Week
NHS Blood & Transplant used augmented reality to show the transformational power of life saving blood donations
A live broadcast from the Caribbean was powered by British Airways
Powering a digital billboard using human energy and Pavegen technology to promote the Toyota Hybrid
Feeding pigs apples in a farm in Buckinghamshire, in real time, via your mobile phone from Westfield, London
Integrating EEG technology which reads brain waves allowing a game of Mind Pong, controlled by human thought, for The Brain Tumour Charity
Via: Ocean Outdoor
 

Stephen Whyte on how programmatic is transforming the creative potential of OOH

The least talked about but most interesting component of programmatic OOH is the transformation that automated ad-serving brings, writes Posterscope’s CEO.
Programmatic out-of-home has been discussed and written about a great deal in recent years and Clear Channel’s plans to accelerate the trading automation of its digital inventory will obviously fuel expectations and discussion further.
However, there are conflicting views about what programmatic could mean for this medium, how it might work and, most importantly, what the benefits to advertisers might be.
In many of the debates, I think that the most important and exciting aspect of programmatic OOH often gets overlooked. Probably because the obvious comparison is programmatic online, discussion tends to focus on the automation of transactions and which model – Programmatic Guaranteed, Private Marketplace or RTB/Open Exchange – is likely to emerge and prevail.
In my view, the answer to this in the short to medium term is Programmatic Guaranteed with each media owner pre-defining pricing by client. This is what Clear Channel announced last week.

In order for a truly biddable market to be established, audience trading metrics and protocols would have to be standardised and agreed across all media owners and agencies.
That’s not likely to be achieved any time soon although the UK is better-placed thanks to Route data than many international markets.
Furthermore, each media owner would have to establish a complex set of pricing rules for their inventory and transfer pricing control from their long-established sales teams and methodologies to a technology platform.
The online advertising market never had this legacy trading approach to overcome, but the cultural shift required for many OOH businesses will be significant.
Close behind the debates about transactional models come the planning opportunities. The provision of real time availability data APIs by media owners will undoubtedly enable faster, more efficient planning by specialists and agencies and almost all the major OOH players in the UK are working to deliver this to some extent in 2017.
But, for me, the least talked about but most interesting component of programmatic OOH is the transformation that automated ad-serving brings. As William Eccleshare noted in his Clear Channel presentation last week, the massive investment in digital screens that the industry has made over recent years has yet to be matched by the dramatic leap in the creative use of the medium that the investment enables.
In addition to being able to buy digital OOH in incredibly focused, targeted and flexible ways, it’s already possible (via platforms like Liveposter), to serve creative content that adapts to multiple, real-time data feeds.
These feeds can be anything from weather to traffic flows, sales, social media trends and other business drivers. Messages can be optimised by target audience subset, by location, by time and day. Advertising content can be drawn from a pool of pre-produced creative work or can be created and edited in real time, in response to relevant data triggers in any and every site location.
In a recent campaign we ran for a client, over 10,000 different creative executions were programmatically served over a two-week national campaign. This highly dynamic use of digital OOH is arguably the biggest single step forward for the OOH medium in decades.
The growth of digital screens in all their shapes and sizes is important and significant but the real power comes from the programmatic ad-serving technology that is available to deliver content to those screens.
It is this aspect of OOH programmatic that is capable of transforming the creative potential of the medium, of attracting new advertisers to it, of building its overall share of media spend and, most importantly, of delivering dramatically more effective campaigns.
And this, far more than the programmatic trading models, is what advertisers and the agencies that represent them should focus on more.
Via: Campaign Live

These 'Don't Smoke and Drive' posters from Uruguay are made of marijuana

Created for Uruguay’s Association of Cannabis Studies, these “potsters” are an out-of-home initiative featuring three posters printed on paper made from marijuana. Copy reminds the public about the dangers of operating a vehicle under the influence of pot, which Uruguay fully legalized for production and sale in 2013.

Each of the signs measures 5.6 feet high by 3 feet wide and carries the tagline, “If you smoked, don’t drive.” They sprouted just after Christmas in highly trafficked areas of Montevideo, and will stay on the streets for a few more weeks.

“We reasoned that if posters made out of pot gave you advice about safer driving, it was probably the most ideal way in which marijuana can actually be beneficial to someone while behind the wheel,” says Juan Ciapessoni, co-founder and chief creative officer of The Electric Factory, which developed the campaign with outdoor ad firm JCDecaux.

Once the fibrous hemp was shredded, flattened and dried, the sheets were painstakingly hand-crafted, just as an artisan might create specialty papers from scraps of recycled material. A silk-screening process was used to apply the text. (Ciapessoni declined to reveal how much weed was used to create the posters, nor would he divulge its source.)

Sure, it’s a gimmick to grab attention, but “the main objective of all of this is to make people understand how important is to be very responsible when driving,” Ciapessoni says. “It was equally important for us to send a big message so that it will have meaningful social impact.”

The “potsters” are also vandal proof – anyone thinking of stealing the signs and trying to smoke them are in for a let down.

“It would be really funny, but not effective, because the process for producing the paper removed the psychoactive effect,” says Ciapessoni. “So if someone smoked it, it would be like smoking a standard paper.”

Via: Ad Week

Posterscope round table discusses: How do we solve a problem like creativity?

Group photo  (back row, l-r) Gideon Spanier, head of media, Campaign; Stephen Whyte, CEO, Posterscope UK; Julian Linley, multimedia consultant; Barnaby Dawe, global chief marketing officer, Just Eat; Claire Beale, global editor-in-chief, Campaign; Helen Weisinger, chief client officer, Outdoor Plus; Glen Wilson, managing director, Posterscope UK; (front row, l-r) Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer, Ogilvy & Mather Group UK; Nicky Bullard, chairman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite; Rick Hirst, CEO, Carat UK; Justin Tindall, group chief creative officer, M&C Saatchi; Sir John Hegarty, founder, Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage; Robert Campbell, creative entrepreneur and founder of Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R; Katie Dulake, head of brand and marketing, TSB Bank

Marketers, creatives and media owners were invited by Posterscope to discuss out-of-home creativity. Campaign’s Stuart Derrick listened in.

You don’t have to press advertising folk or marketers too hard to come up with their favourite poster campaign. Whether it’s The Economist’s clever copy, British Airways’ “#lookup”, numerous eye-catching Nike ads, Araldite’s iconic stuck-on car poster, or any number of mood-shifting political campaigns, out-of-home packs a memorable punch.

Gideon Spanier, Campaign‘s head of media, who chaired the debate on the state of creativity in OOH, kicked off the conversation with the recognition that, while the £1bn sector is in rude health, with revenue up for the eighth year in a row, there remains a concern that not all marketers and creative agencies are still inspired to create engaging OOH creative.

Posterscope CEO Stephen Whyte said: “OOH has a long history of strong, impactful creative and, today, brands such as Apple are using it to great effect, but lately this has tended to be an exception rather than the norm.”

He asked what the challenge is for creative teams, and why they are not excited about the creative opportunity in OOH. “As an industry, we need to do more to champion the creative strengths of the medium. Seeing more powerful, engaging OOH will be the best way to motivate both agencies and clients to want and demand the best work for their brands.”

And creatives themselves still love OOH. Emma de la Fosse, chief creative officer of Ogilvy & Mather Group UK, said: “When I trained, distilling the campaign message to four words on a 48-sheet was considered the skill of advertising. It’s what got me into the industry.”

With many evolving formats, the medium may have lost its essence by trying to be all things, according to Justin Tindall, group chief creative officer of M&C Saatchi. “It’s become a generalist in a world obsessed with specialists,” he added.
Barnaby Dawe, global chief marketing officer of Just Eat, appreciates the traditional marketing mix and the extreme measurability of pay-per-click in equal measure. OOH is one of his brand’s key advertising channels.

“The climate in which we operate, where the CEO and CFO want to see ROI, means that PPC becomes an unhealthy addiction, with its ability to demonstrate instant effectiveness,” he said. “Outdoor is up against both traditional broadcast media and also new media, such as carousel and canvas ads on Facebook. As a generalist marketer, I’m keen to show how effective a combination of both performance and outdoor media can be.”

Creative solutions
Creative legend Sir John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage, said the challenge faced by OOH is also manifest in the wider ad industry.

“A generation of marketing directors are failing to understand how to build powerful brands – they confuse persuasion and promotion,” he argued. “Focusing on just short-term promotional messages. They’ve lost faith in long-term brand building. Maybe it’s too difficult for them?”

In this environment, there has been a loss of bravery in committing to a medium that doesn’t have the rack of analytics of digital. “For clients who are driven by, and rewarded for, an almost instantaneous focus on results, it can be difficult to keep posters on the plan,” Rick Hirst, CEO of Carat UK, said.
Katie Dulake, head of brand and marketing at TSB Bank, added that OOH can play a different role. For a challenger brand, it provides reach. “Our brand purpose is bringing local banking back to the UK. It’s all about where people live and work, so OOH is great for that. It also supplements our physical brand presence – our branches – on the high street,” she said.

However, there was a feeling around the table that creative agencies don’t design for the medium. “A 48-sheet brief could have been career defining at one time,” said Claire Beale, global editor in chief of Campaign, who pondered whether creative directors still fought over them.

“We used to go out and look at poster sites to get an idea of context and where the message would be,” Robert Campbell, creative entrepreneur and co-founder of Rainey Kelly Campbell Roalfe/Y&R, said. “People do not give it that time any more.”

Helen Weisinger, who recently joined Outdoor Plus as chief client officer from a creative agency background, said there was a knowledge gap in the market and education was the key. “Creative and measurement are the two areas where people don’t know what OOH can do yet,” she contended.

De la Fosse suggested specialist OOH media agencies and media owners should increasingly work with creative agencies to stimulate creatives and push boundaries, as was the case with Ogilvy & Mather’s “#lookup” campaign for British Airways.

Glen Wilson, managing director of Posterscope UK, suggested the industry might be lacking bravery, and that incentivising creativity either through reviewing the creative awards programmes for OOH or reducing the cost of inventory based on creative excellence might be the way forward.

Hegarty advised agencies to get back to basic principles and an understanding of how value is built.

“Technology enables opportunity, creativity creates value,” he said. “So, as posters increasingly become a digital offering, [they provide] creative opportunity and cultural importance. They should also embrace wall painting. Call it Craft Advertising. Think how famous Banksy became from his wall art.”

The consensus was that, rather than focus on what posters can and can’t do, there is a need to focus on deliverables and objectives – to get back to what OOH does best and change the conversation to highlight that this is a medium where creativity can flourish.

[youtube width=”300px” height=”200px”]1EHoqCOrRLM[/youtube]

“Apple’s ‘Shot on iPhone’ is one of the best poster campaigns of the last three years. I don’t care how many pixels the camera has. If it takes pictures like that, I want it”

– Sir John Hegarty, founder of Bartle Bogle Hegarty and The Garage

 

“If you can’t tell the story on a poster, it’s not a story worth telling”

– Nicky Bullard, chairman and chief creative officer, MRM Meteorite

 

“Data and technology present a great opportunity for DOOH but we shouldn’t ignore the scale, creative opportunity and fame-building strength the medium provides”

– Stephen Whyte, CEO, Posterscope

 “There’s pushback against clickbait to focus on quality content that speaks directly to an audience. It’s hard to gain attention through the noise online, but posters can cut through by virtue of being more environmental”

– Julian Linley, multimedia consultant

The full article on Campaign Live can be read here

Primesight launches #TheUltimateCanvas for the creative community

Primesight has partnered with Talenthouse, the creative collaboration platform and community of artists across art, design, fashion, film, photography and music, to offer the world’s creative community the chance to showcase their artwork on coveted media space in the UK’s biggest cities.
#TheUltimateCanvas will see artists, designers, illustrators and photographers go head-to-head to create original artwork for Primesight’s 96-sheet billboards, the largest of the out-of-home formats.
Five selected artists will be chosen and each will be showcased in one of five sites across London, Birmingham, Manchester, Glasgow and Bristol. A panel of judges from the advertising and media industries will make a decision on the best designs by the end of May. The panel includes Andy Tilley (CSO, Talon OOH), Mel Harvey (Creative Lead, Saatchi Masius), Nicola Thompson (Director of Media, Estée Lauder), Glen Wilson (Managing Director, Posterscope), Richard Jacobs (Marketing Director, Kinetic), Paul Sambrook (Business Development and Marketing Director, Rapport), Mark Craze (Chairman, OMC) and Chris Forrester (Managing Director, Primesight).
Selected artists will have their designs seen by thousands of people every day for a period of two weeks. In addition, all artwork will be showcased in a global gallery amplified across Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest under the #TheUltimateCanvas.
Primesight is encouraging creatives around the world to take full advantage of the panoramic format and arresting visual impact of the 96-sheet, which is 40 foot long by 10 feet high – though the open nature of the competition will offer creatives complete freedom when it comes to their design.

Chris Forrester, Managing Director at Primesight, said:

“#TheUltimateCanvas is an exciting opportunity for experienced or fledgling designers after a challenge. Our 96-sheets have the ability to make a statement like no other classic poster site – and we’re looking forward to discovering beautiful, original artwork that will make entire cities stop in their tracks.”

Maya Bogle, Co-founder of Talenthouse, said:

“At Talenthouse we’re helping brands to open doors to the world’s creative communities where artists of all disciplines can have their work developed, supported, mentored and showcased in the most innovative ways. Advertising platforms like Primesight are taking an innovative approach to unlocking their story by partnering with Talenthouse.

Clever Volkswagen Ads Show You Can’t Look at Two Places at Once

To deter drivers from ‘text-driving’, Volkswagen—with the help of German advertising agency Grabarz Partner—has created a series of clever print ads.
Each ad features two tiny images that are widely separated by a line of text, which says “Try looking at both at the same time”.
Viewers would find it difficult to focus on both images, highlighting the message that Volkswagen hopes to bring across—that it’s impossible to focus on the road while texting.
Via: Design Taxi 

Questions for the Creatives at Cannes Lions 2014

Digital Out of Home is coming of age, and is arguably one of the most exciting platforms for advertisers to use to engage with their consumers in today’s media landscape. The palate of tools that DOOH now offers is vast, driven by huge technology advances and a deeper understanding of the unique capabilities of the medium. The Creative industry are embracing these opportunities to deliver something new.
Preceding the 30th June launch of the 2014 The Art of Outdoor Digital Competition, Ocean and Brand Republic are at Cannes Lions 2014 this week, and are speaking to five industry ambassadors throughout the week about their perceptions of Digital out of home, and how the medium has evolved for the better.
Via: Ocean Outdoor

Portfolio Items