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Route data shows OOH audience has increased in the last quarter on both digital and poster sites

New data released today (8th March) by Route show that the audience of out of home advertising has increased in the last quarter. Growth is seen for both digital screens and posters.
Following sustained investment in new inventory, the audience for digital out of home (DOOH) continues its recent growth. DOOH now offers advertisers 60% weekly cover of adults in GB, up from 51% in the previous quarter. This increase is driven by a 17% rise in digital inventory measured by Route. In total, audience data are now provided for 6,820 digital screens.
Digital inventory remains an attractive option for advertisers wanting to reach various commercially appealing audiences including ABC1s (63% weekly GB cover – up from 56%), 18-34s (63%, up from 55%) and main shoppers (58% reached weekly, up from 50%).

The urban clustering of digital inventory also means that it can offer higher cover of geographically targeted audiences. For instance, each week DOOH reaches 94% of Londoners, 86% of people in Birmingham, 79% of Glaswegians and 60% of those in Greater Manchester.
The growing audiences for out of home are not limited to digital sites, with increases noted in posters too. For instance, a one week roadside campaign may generate between 7-10% more impacts than in R25 depending on the campaign weight. Similarly, campaigns in rail stations have increased their unique reach by between 4-6% on average.


Also new to Route in this release is the launch of a new ad format, the lamppost banner, which introduces to advertisers a new audience of 1.1million adults across London, South East and Birmingham.
The new Route data now include a larger refreshed sample as well as updates to both populations and traffic counts. This is the first report to feature readings from the new Multi Sensor Tracking meters. It has led to an improvement in the accuracy of the survey and increased the travel distances being recorded for participants.
Via: Route

PSI publish their 2018 Global Travel Predictions

2018 looks set to be another roller-coaster year for the global travel industry.
In this piece, James McEwan, Managing Director of PSI, identifies some of the political, economic and technological factors that will impact the way consumers travel this year.
Read More….

Outdoor advertising is reaching its 'big bang' moment

Out-of-home is reaching its ‘big bang’ moment as technology, data and infrastructure are now seamlessly coming together, writes Glen Wilson, the managing director at Posterscope.

Les Binet and Peter Field’s recent IPA study, Marketing Effectiveness in the Digital Era, again draws attention to the importance of reach and time spent with a medium as key drivers of effectiveness. The fact that out-of-home, in its entirety, continues to deliver more than 90% reach and three hours spent in its company every day, underlines its importance and resilience in a transforming media landscape.

Interestingly, the report also observes that, since the advent of digital OOH, effectiveness of the medium has nearly doubled. I believe this is just the start.

I think OOH is nearing its “big bang” moment, where data, technology and physical infrastructure genuinely and seamlessly connect to enable a new era of efficiency and effectiveness for advertisers. All of the key ingredients are in place so here’s why the medium will be bigger and better then ever.

OOH at the speed of life

OOH has been transformed by digitisation over the past few years and that aggressive digital focus will continue in 2018. Fifty per cent of OOH revenue will be digital, and digital alone will be able to reach 50% of the population.

A significant development will be the delivery of more scaled automated trading. We’ve seen lots of column inches and many promises but we’re starting to see the full delivery of automated booking across the industry, albeit at varied pace. For advertisers, the key benefit is speed.

OOH planning and buying has traditionally occurred months out from live dates with the exact sites selected, negotiated and transacted upfront. Now channel investment can be more flexible with some campaign parts confirmed days before the live date.

It can also enable upfront impression commitments but with agile deployment; automated guaranteed, in other words. This will provide a more compelling and competitive proposition to deliver more responsive and reactive broadcast reach.

More flexible, more dynamic, more effective

This more frictionless connection across digital OOH products will see an increasing application of dynamic content and ad-serving to optimise creative delivery. Messaging that reflects more closely what audiences are thinking, feeling and doing at specific moments, in specific places.

Powered by more prolific, accessible and usable data, digital OOH will be used in more dynamic ways and deliver a growing array of benefits to advertisers.

Research has revealed that dynamic digital OOH used to serve more contextually relevant messages increases spontaneous advertising awareness by 18%. Furthermore, ad-serving relevant content by audience increases the effectiveness of a campaign by at least 15%.

Ultimately, where data-driven, location-based insights reveal the customer “moments that matter”, and where OOH is planned and activated around these, it works harder and delivers significant ROI improvement.

Launch of new OOH products

Media owners’ tireless and relentless pursuit of a better product will bring an incredible line-up of new offerings in 2018.

These will include the roll-out of Wi-Fi-enabled Inlink units, a reimagination of BT’s phone boxes, Clear Channel’s smart payphone project, JCDecaux’s continued screen investment, Exterion’s full-motion Underground cross-track screens and Ocean Outdoor’s recent launch of the biggest digital OOH screen in Western Europe, the Piccadilly Lights. All of which will support more convergence with other digital media, principally mobile, resulting in better media campaigns for the advertiser and better experiences for consumers.

Closing the loop

Big strides in performance and effectiveness will come from the integration of feedback loops into the dynamic, digital ecosystem. Sales, stock levels or footfall will be used to calibrate, in real time, the weight, frequency and nature of messaging.

We’ve already seen pockets of activity across categories, such as British Airways’ flight sale campaign earlier this year where messaging changed depending on BA’s weekly “priority” routes and availability of specific destinations.

In particular, we’ll see the obvious symbiotic relationship between mobile and OOH become more of a reality. Accessibility of mobile location data, greater collaboration with location-based mobile media owners and the ability of OOH planning systems to seamlessly ingest and process this data, will enable more holistic, integrated and effective activation across both channels.

A creative renaissance

There is undeniable and enduring power and purity in a great idea, articulated with a striking image and pithy copy line – a classic poster. There is, perhaps, a perceived simplicity to this task that makes it a less alluring creative challenge in a world of one-to-one communication. The fact is, simple is hard and we must do more to acknowledge and celebrate this among the creative community.

Mass digitisation of OOH presents a new creative palette and we’ve seen only a fraction of what’s possible as the creative industry starts to embrace the new opportunity.

Via: Campaign Live

Spotify wrap up 2017 with "2018 goals" campaign

Spotify is wrapping up 2017 with its biggest marketing campaign of the year that builds upon last year’s “Thanks, 2016… it’s been weird”.

The brand once again puts a humorous twist on user data to open a window into pop culture. Featuring 70 artists including Ed Sheeran and Sam Smith, the ads will run in 18 markets and include straplines such as “2018 goals: Be as loving as the person who put 48 Ed Sheeran songs on their ‘I Love Gingers’ playlist”. The work was created in-house by Spotify’s brand and creative team.
Via: Campaign

Pop-up store customers asked to pay with personal data instead of money

To emphaphise just how much data we provide freely to the platforms we use to share our lives, cyber-security firm Kaspersky Lab opened a pop-up shop inside Old Street station in London called The Data Dollar Store.
Customers were able to buy exclusive t-shirts, mugs and screen prints by street artist Ben Eine – not with money, but by handing over their personal data.

For instance, to ‘buy’ the mug, you had to hand over three photos, or screenshots of your WhatsApp, text and email conversations.
To buy the t-shirt, you had to part with the last three photos on your Camera Roll, or the last three messages on your phone.
The original print, finally, forced you to give your phone to a member of staff, who would then select five photos or three screenshots of their choosing.
Via: PR Examples
 

Posterscope USA work with the New Belgian Brewing company to target thirsty New Yorkers

Product availability was used to inform directional  creative.
Real time beer availability and Google “popular time” data was used to guide thirsty New Yorkers to the closest bar (vs ordering online).
The Voodoo Ranger kept consumers entertained  with reactive messaging  around “March Madness” and other social holiday periods such as St Patricks Day, April Fools etc.
Take a look at the official campaign video.
 

Posterscope Netherlands host round table debate @ Digital Marketing Live 2017

Posterscope Netherlands host round table debate @ Digital Marketing Live 2017
On Thursday the first of June the sixth edition of Digital Marketing Live event took place. Dentsu Aegis Network Netherlands participated as content partner and organized two presentations and four round tables.
Together with Isobar colleague Melvin van Gom, Bas van den Hoogen, managing director Posterscope Netherlands hosted a roundtable in which they claimed that we as marketing and media professionals are closer to the consumer than we think. They showed how data gives us a range of insights that we can use to map the target audience’s customer journey. By telling a fictional story about a day in the life of a customer Bas and Melvin explained how OOH and mobile can enhance each other.
By giving participants a look in a day of a customer with multiple touchpoints they showed that we can follow and interact with the consumer everywhere. The story starts with a daily morning routine of a fictional person, followed by how he travels to work every day and ends with multiple possible scenario’s after a day of work. During the story the participants were asked their opinion about audience insights and interaction options. After every claim Bas and Melvin explained how OOH in combination with mobile advertising can be used effectively. Overall this round table focused on the desired effect that marketing and media professionals are getting aware of the fact that the OOH/mobile media mix creates an engagement uplift for their campaigns.

 

Posterscope rolls out high decibel campaign to promote OPPO camera phone F3 Plus

To stay ahead of the growth curve, a smartphone brand has not only to unveil new technologies and software updates but also keep the TG updated of the same. OPPO having launched its new ERA Selfie Expert phone F3 Plus with a high quality camera skills rolled out an extensive OOH campaign to showcase the new offering to the youth in particular across SEC A+, A & B.

In the Gujarat markets, Posterscope India handled the outdoor mandate for the brand, using its proprietary planning dashboard OOHZONE that delivers audience optimisation through a TG mapping module. The module showcases TG touchpoints from the rich research data of OCS (India’s largest OOH Consumer Survey with a sample size 12,000+), creates a heat map visualisation, overlays these locations with live traffic intelligence and selects sites based on those data points.
Read more …

A review of the Science Museum's latest exhibition 'Our Lives in Data'

By Megin Gauntlett, Insight Executive
Being part of the *multiply team at Posterscope, we are more than comfortable with data as valuable currency. We pride ourselves on using the best, proprietary approaches to data in order to understand consumers better. This understanding in turn enables us to deliver the most targeted messaging, in the right moment and in the right location.
But what is the viewpoint of the consumer? How much do they actually know about the capture and use of their data? And when put in the consumer’s shoes, would you still think that the scores, reams and mountains of data collected and cleaned regarding your life is interesting or invasive? We can sometimes think about consumers as though they are different and separate to us and we must be careful that we don’t create a practice of dehumanising data.
We wanted to go to the Science Museum’s current exhibition, Our Lives in Data, to see their approach to education around data’s usage and how children, in particular, are shaping their views in a personalised, but essentially trackable, life.
Our Lives in Data was made up of four different sections; transport and smart cities, the IoT, genomic and social. The first and last are areas in which Posterscope have a large amount of experience. We use transport data every day in our work as Location Experts, defining how audiences move around the city in order to better understand how to reach them in the most relevant ways. We regularly use social data in our planning tools to see what is resonating for consumers, how they feel about brands and lifestyles and what they are gravitating towards in terms of behaviours.
The exhibition was set up as a blend of static exhibitions and interactive experiences. In the transport section, there was a data visualisation of Bond St Station showcasing how new tube stations and transit hubs are designed using predictive consumer data – knowing how people move through the station and streets surrounding it to enable city planners to create better, frictionless travel. This was interesting given Posterscope’s new partnership with Digit Group in the smart cities space. Using data to understand a location better and predict behaviours from a design perspective is only a decade or so old. But now, with connected payments, mobile signal data and the like, we can make the city work harder for its inhabitants.
Moving through into the IoT section, we saw connected toys showcased with variant degrees of consumer uptake – we have all heard the story of the doll that learned to speak not so kid-friendly words. This section also featured a type of paint that could be used on routers to block Wi-Fi signal pickups from external users. Considering Wi-Fi signals is a key method of understanding a location’s footfall at present, this paint was a surprise to some in the group. The exhibition also discussed whether consumers have been educated enough on the options available to them in this area when it comes to privacy of signals themselves (regardless of the fact the data collected is not being used to see individual information).
We then saw how genomic experts were using VR headsets to navigate their way through huge amounts of genetic data to better treat patients, even before they are sick. The exhibition talked around how the technology which began as a platform for better gaming has actually had a remarkable effect on how doctors and scientists can view microscopic and subatomic worlds. Given the complexity of educating children in genomic data, this area of the exhibition remained top line but it was a great way to show how a familiar technology like VR can be used to solve complex human issues.
Finally, we moved on to the social data area of the exhibition, with some very interesting facts for children and adults alike. For example, they shared that ‘Facebook users have four times the audience online than they estimate’ and that ‘within two weeks, 71% of people self-censor their own Facebook posts’. These statistics were interesting from a consumer perspective – we all know we self-edit but the fact it was post-rationalised editing showed how consumers are highly conscious about the image (and data) that they share with their ‘friends.’ The exhibition referred to ‘personality data’ or what we would call consumer trends.
There was an interactive element which replicated a basic planning tool – you could select which brands you like, and to what scale, and the tool would punch out a more personalised ad for you at the end. This is of course extremely pertinent to our world of dynamic adverts where Posterscope delivers relevant advertising content against specific audiences and mind-sets. It was surprising and exciting to see how the world of dynamic advertising was shown to kids and visitors, creating a positive connection and awareness around why ads were personalised to them.
Finally there was a video debate from the Policy Director of Facebook and Dr David Stillwell and he is a lecturer in Big Data Analytics at Cambridge University discussing data privacy and the future. Their conclusion was that consumers are demanding a personalised world with both brands and platforms understanding them and creating experiences with their individual preferences in mind. However, proceeding with caution was the message of the day – safe handling of data is the top priority.
In conclusion, visiting Our Lives in Data wasn’t about learning new data-trends, it was about understanding how the increasingly complex area of our business and the world going forward is being communicated to the younger generation. Brad Gilbert from the *multiply team said “the exhibition’s content may not have been new for us but it’s interesting to see an exhibition that explains simply to the public their data is captured and used. People are becoming more informed and empowered about the handling of their data, and it was important for us to see how this exhibition presented this to the public.’
Our Lives in Data captured the key areas of data in our daily lives, but it also enabled visitors to think about what would be missing in a world without data and the see-saw we all balance to improve our daily lives vs living an Orwellian existence. Given all the debate on this in our industry, it is important for us to remember that not all consumers are data experts but that we are all consumers.
Our Lives in Data is open until 01/09/2017 and you can find out more about the exhibition here.

Ad Week Europe 2017: Remembering the big picture

By Rachel Taylor, Strategic Manager at Posterscope
I was lucky enough to spend time at this year’s Advertising Week Europe to listen to all of the fantastic speakers debating the key questions for our industry. The core contemporary pillars were well covered; programmatic, content, mobile and agency structures stood out as key themes. However, there also seemed to be a growing focus on wider socio-cultural events, such as Brexit or Trump’s election, which sit outside our industry but still impact our decisions.
Whatever form Brexit takes, it will have implications for both client marketing budgets, be that positive or negative, and for consumer attitudes and spending power. Consequentially, there are still debates and big questions for the advertising industry to be involved in. Thursday’s ‘Open Minds, Open Boarders’ debate aptly highlighted the issue of junior creative talent and the need to maintain diversity if we are to grow London’s creative community. However, I feel one of the most interesting underlying conclusions of this talk was that the implications of Brexit on the industry are all still uncertain and there is nothing we can stick our teeth into until the dust begins to settle.
A strong theme this year was the role of emotion in technology and data as well as remembering the human element at the centre of advertising campaigns. Ravleen Beeston of Microsoft looked at technology’s empathetic potential, demonstrating chat bots which can anticipate and mitigate potentially fractious moments such as splitting a drinks bill. Interestingly however, the debate around these kinds of innovations kept returning to the warning that we should not allow ourselves to fall into a bubble and design campaigns around technology consumers aren’t ready for.
Indeed, the ‘Future of Tech and The Millennial Consumer’ stage profiled businesses which were all firmly rooted in their audience understanding, be that to alleviate the struggling care industry or redesigning dating for queer women. In the case of Grabble, the business completely pivoted based on the new audience understanding that their audience wanted more boutique labels and they needed to appeals to a consumer with more disposable income than their original student target. A great example of audience truths designing the product rather than fitting an audience to the platform.
Certainly, the advertising industry now places great focus on ensuring messaging is rooted in audience understanding but this was a good reminder that the same is true for innovation. While some technologies may have become commonplace in media land, we should not get ahead of ourselves and always root design in the human experience.
In as much as we should be remembering the wider world experience effects our consumers, the broader world picture also effects our relationship with our clients. While we are good at watching the competitor environment and market forces which will be shaping client pressures, Rory Sutherland made a fantastic point when he argued we are limiting ourselves when we only speak to our clients about MarComs. That is certainly where our specialism lies but the power of our data and strategic thinking can stretch must further, answering at least wider marketing questions.
Indeed, Posterscope have started pushing beyond the bounds of OOH media to employ our location expertise in wider location analysis projects powered by our award winning ECOS platform. This allows us to explore a range of wider client challenges, be that the location understanding powering a wider communications brief or broad location mapping of audiences by behaviour to help clients really understand what is really happening on the ground. Similarly, MKTG have pushed beyond experiential with their Smart Bench roll out, demonstrating that we can also be part of the smart city revolution and shape the future design of the cities we live in.
It’s an exciting time to be in the industry. There is a wealth of potential for us to apply our audience data to business intelligence and we should be thinking big in order to make the most of it. But if we are to turn this potential into success two watch outs stand out: don’t go too big for the humans we are speaking too and don’t sell ourselves too small to clients who will then look to someone else.