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Knowledge ages quickly, as shown by this billboard that grew mold on a classic marketing book

There’s still much to be learned from books written by the great minds of advertising’s golden age, but it’s hard to deny that almost any advice printed to the page quickly becomes dated in today’s digitally driven world.
To illustrate that point, and boost turnout at an upcoming IdeasFirst Ukrainian Marketing Forum, BBDO Ukraine created an out-of-home ad that featured a large edition of Kotler on Marketing by U.S. advertising Professor Philip Kotler. The book was slathered with millions of mold spores before being encased in an ad display at an office and commercial location.
After a few days in a “standby mode” inside the display, the mold grew rapidly and covered the book in a distorting layer of fuzz and discoloration. The result was oddly and disturbingly beautiful in its own way, and as you can see from the case study below, it certainly drew plenty of attention.

Creating a way to grow mold rapidly in a public display proved to be quite a challenge, the agency says. Here’s a summary of the process, provided by BBDO Ukraine:

“In order to get the project to work, we prepared a special layout for the book with perforations for moisture. We experimented to find a material that would allow the mold to spread. We created an environment that was conducive to growing the desired mold while preventing harmful bacteria from disrupting the mold growth. After several unsuccessful attempts, we had to completely abandon the use of toxic materials. We dried out a couple of mold populations and were forced to redesign the citylight panel’s wall construction. This helped create the ideal microclimate, from the illumination to the humidity to the temperature. In short, it was much more difficult than just leaving out a loaf of bread for a week and getting results.”
It’s worth noting this is one of the few ad campaigns you’ll see where the credits include a microbiologist.
The project’s self-destructive nature has sparked a few criticisms, according to the creatives who worked on it.
“We are faced with a wave of haters, adherents of classical marketing and fans of Kotler who think that we scoff at something holy,” BBDO Ukraine creative director Den Keleberdenko tells Adweek. “At the same time, we stirred up new generation of marketers who are open to the world and innovation in marketing.”
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Via: AdWeek

Open canvas: creative you just can't ignore (December 2017)

Two experts pick their favourite out of home campaigns and explain why their chosen work makes the most of the medium

Paul Jordan, co-executive creative director, Mcgarrybowen


Sometimes we just need to recognise the power of the product and the platform, then get the hell out of the way.I love love love the Coca-Cola screens illuminating Piccadilly Circus right now.
I won’t call them ads, because they’re not. Not really. Not ads in the way we think of them – jaw-dropping headlines and traffic-jamming visuals.
No, these screens do something much simpler. Much more effective. They instantly make me want to buy a Coke. And I’m a cynical old adman who doesn’t particularly like Coke.
Picture it. A chilly Wednesday night. Stepping out of a restaurant at the bottom of Regent Street. Hugging a friend goodbye and BLAM! There it was, over his shoulder. A gigantic, slow-motion Coke cap flying off a bottle; that brown fizzy stuff gloriously cascading into a glass. I couldn’t work it out. Full up on London’s finest dining and now all I could think was “I want a Coke.”
Was it nostalgia for the red and white of the world’s most iconic brand? The warm glow lighting up a cold night? All I know is that, some-how, this combination of logos and pack shots worked its magic on me and raced straight to my amygdala as if I’d just necked a can of the stuff.
There was no smart wordplay or visual trickery and that was its strength. When we write ads for OOH we have this rule; nine words or less for a headline. But I don’t think these Coke ads even have words. They’re that simple; that impactful.
And that’s the point. A 4K screen the size of a tennis court gives you impact. Lighting up Piccadilly Circus gives you impact. The red and white of the world’s most famous brand has impact.
Sometimes we just need to recognise the power of the product and the platform, then get the hell out of the way.
Apple gets this. Those posters wrapping whole office buildings with the latest iPhone on them aren’t really ads either, but they work in the same way. I want what they’re selling. But you can only get away with this in large-format OOH – anywhere else, any smaller, and it’s just a bit boring.

Sarah Hardcastle, creative, Mr President


In the age of the smartphone it’s easy to only see the things we want to see. From newsfeeds that show us only the stuff we like to clicking ‘skip’ on YouTube, consumers have never had more control over messages that are shared with them.But what about the messages nobody wants to see – or, worse, can’t see at all?
In Finland, 25,000 cases of domestic violence are reported to the police every year. That’s 70 acts of violence a day, with 88% taking place after dark, out of sight, unnoticed.
It’s this alarming statistic that sits behind the thinking of this reactive campaign for the Helsinki Police department, a partnership between JCDecaux and TBWA.
Using location data collected when a report is made, they were able to target the 15 closest OOH units to the crime with a powerful poster campaign the very next day. The posters at first appear to be straightforward ads for a kitchen or beauty brand but, once night falls, a black-light transforms the image to reveal the disturbing truth taking place behind closed doors.
This hyper-local approach meant that the neighbours of victims would be faced with the stark reality of the problem on their own street, making the messaging “You can’t hide the signs of violence” all the more poignant by placing it in spots that are hard to ignore.
The beauty and impact of this idea is in using targeted OOH, as by its very nature it can’t be skipped, scrolled past or blocked. It’s a smart strategy that plays on the medium’s strengths in a bold, reactive way, made all the more effective when combined with the eye-catching creative.
At Mr President, we’re firm believers in bring-ing media and creative together like this, and I can imagine how implementing the idea into digital OOH could make it even more powerful, (for example) by incorporating street names or even the number of calls made in that location.
Many brands are using the technology in this way already – British Airways with its “#lookup” activity, for one. But however it evolves, I hope this campaign continues to become more and more impactful – until it won’t be needed at all.
Open Canvas V5

Via: Campaign 

The Outlook from Outsmart

Outsmart have launched their first report, The OutLook, a collection of love letters to the medium penned by a variety of ad industry professionals.
The report reveals that industry experts from across different disciplines and with different perspectives are equally excited and enthused by what OOH can do for advertisers, both now and in the future. As technology drives changes in consumer behaviours, OOH is enhanced, while other mediums are facing challenges and having to adapt.
The OutLook features thought leadership and commentary from leading industry figures including contributors from influential businesses including TFL, Starcom Mediavest Group and adam&eveDDB. The report also features contributions from many of today’s leading OOH operators, including Council Members, Specialists and Media Owners.
The report explores the limitless opportunities of the medium whilst showcasing why advertisers should consider OOH on every media plan. It also examines what the future holds for the medium supporting the marketing body’s belief that OOH delivers high impact, action, relevance and creativity.
Alan Brydon, CEO of Outsmart, said: “We know from our daily conversations within the media community that the medium is highly regarded and loved by advertisers and consumers alike. This report demonstrates just how much the industry believes in OOH and how it can still pack a punch in today’s evolving marketing landscape. I look forward to collaborating further with the industry over the coming year as we continue to showcase the many benefits of the medium.”
Read the full report here
Via: Outsmart 

Ocean Restructures as the Group Looks to International Expansion

Ocean CEO Tim Bleakley has announced a restructure after integrating two key businesses, Signature and MediaCo, post acquisition. The restructure marks the formation of the Ocean Group.

To strengthen operations across both the Ocean and Signature Outdoor businesses, Ocean finance director Stephen Joseph is promoted to Group chief operating officer. Stephen takes responsibility for all commercial contract negotiation, procurement and oversees finance which is now headed up by Billy Byam-Cook.   

Nick Shaw, previously Ocean associate director and head of international sales, is promoted to sales director of the Ocean brand, reporting to Group sales director Iain Chapman.

Signature sales director James Harrison takes on added responsibilities as deputy managing director of Signature Outdoor, also reporting to Iain Chapman.

Gerry Bew, founding partner of Signature Outdoor in Birmingham becomes chairman of the Signature brand and businesses with a focus on operational integration in Manchester. His co founder Steve George becomes managing director of the Signature Birmingham business and oversees the management of Signature’s contract with Birmingham City Council.

Joseph Arshed, a founder of Mediaco, has joined the Ocean Group operating board and will continue to coordinate all key contracts in Manchester with a major focus on Manchester City Council.    

CEO Tim Bleakley said:” Over the years we have grown and developed some top talent and recently, as part of the Signature and Mediaco acquisitions, we have taken on some hugely talented senior figures with a fantastic entrepreneurial spirit.

“Group Development Director Mark Bracey will continue to run Ocean brand UK and International development including the launch of the International Alliance”

“At the core of the Ocean Group business is our desire to always find ‘another way’ for all our stakeholders, landlords, OOH specialists, agencies and clients. These changes ensure the breadth and depth of our experience and expertise is made available to our partners to help them grow.”   

Via: Ocean Outdoor

Media Playground Returns Next Week

On 3 November senior executives from across the industry will gather to debate some of the biggest issues facing digital media. Cutting through the hype to offer real thought leadership, MediaTel has gathered some of the best minds in the sector to help delegates understand the transformative and disruptive media shaping the future.
The line-up is impressive; including senior industry figures such as Jon Wilkins, chairman of Karmarama, Ashley Highfield, CEO of Johnston Press and Simon Daglish, group commercial director at ITV, to start-up companies including Future Ad Labs and Flocker.
The client world is represented by Merlin’s Jason Wills and Freestyle’s Rob Rees.
They will be joining a host of other top quality panellists, including Posterscope’s Chief Strategy Officer, James Davies, who will be talking about mobile and location. Chairing duties will be split throughout the full-day event between regular Newsline columnists Dominic Mills and Torin Douglas.
The agenda is far-reaching and includes:
– Disruptive TV – Where next?
– TV is going to be traded just like VOD…isn’t it ?
– Clients, agencies and media owners on the mobile and social challenge
– Innovation – the brightest new start-ups give us their pitches
– Keynote interview: Ashley Highfield, CEO, Johnston Press
– The new content world: Native, branded and social.
– Mobile – Location, location, location
– Understanding changing consumer behaviours

Event partners include: Decipher, VisualDNA, Experian, Livefyre, Lumen, The Bakery, Adap.tv and Weve – alongside Posterscope, Johnston Press, MediaCom, EE, Appflare, The Sharp End, Reload Digital, Freestyle Ltd, Merlin, Karmarama, Freesat, ITV, MobiTV, Yossarian, Race Yourself, Future Ad Labs and Flocker.

Tickets cost £250, with only the last few remaining.
Full line-up, agenda and booking details can be found on MediaTel’s events website.
Via: MediaTel

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