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New Premium Roadside DOOH in Birmingham for Signature Outdoor

Introducing three new large format Digital Out of Home locations in Birmingham from Signature Outdoor.
Part of their Central Networks proposition, two digital 96 sheets and one new digital 48 sheet will help you reach even more people across Birmingham!

Real World December 2014

The Real World covers information about consumer behaviour and inspiring ways to use OOH, as well as recent industry news and the latest on the OOH marketplace.
Please click here to read it.

Real World November 2014

The Real World covers information about consumer behaviour and inspiring ways to use OOH, as well as recent industry news and the latest on the OOH marketplace.
Please click here to read it.

 

Real World September 2014

The Real World covers information about consumer behaviour and inspiring ways to use OOH, as well as recent industry news and the latest on the OOH marketplace.
Please click here to read it.

Out of Home Adspend Forecast to Exceed £1bn in 2014

In the final part of MediaTel’s series looking in detail at the latest UK adspend forecasts, Suzy Young, data and journals director at Warc, exmaines how new digital technology is accelerating growth for the out of home sector.
In Q1 2014, out of home advertising expenditure dipped 2.2% compared with the same period a year ago, according to the latest data released in the Advertising Association/Warc Expenditure Report this week. But this is expected to be just a temporary blip, and Warc forecast consistent growth throughout the rest of the year and into 2015.
Warc predict annual growth in the out of home sector of 2.7% in 2014, reaching a total of £1,017m. This is the first time the sector will have surpassed the £1bn mark. The pace of annual growth is expected to accelerate to 5.9% in 2015, or £1,077m.
In recent years the out of home sector has performed consistently well, recording year-on-year growth in all but four of the last 31 years, with these dips occurring in line with the total ad market, following economic recessions and the dotcom crash in 2001.
1
Note: Outdoor Media Centre; AA/Warc. Source: AA/Warc Expenditure Report.
The London Olympics in 2012 provided a significant boost to out of home ads in particular, with spend rising 25.4% year-on-year in Q3 2012 and helping the annual total increase by a strong 9.5%.
According to YouGov research, 62% of visitors to the Games were aware of outdoor advertising related to the event. Consequently, the AA/Warc had initially forecast a drop in adspend for 2013 given the lack of a similar event, but out of home maintained its upward trajectory to register growth of 2.0%.
One of the key reasons for this success is the sector’s rapid adoption of new digital technology. As the chart shows, digital’s share of total out of home advertising expenditure has grown significantly over the last 11 years – when the traditional vs. digital formats were first tracked. Digital adspend has grown from a 1.4% share of adspend in 2003 to a 21.6% share in 2013.
Mike Baker, CEO at the Outdoor Media Centre, said: “In 2013, outdoor beat expectations, growing 2% over the spectacular Olympic year. What’s behind the continued growth? Digital is the main driver, with consistent investment by media owners into high profile sites such as Clear Channel’s Storm panels on Cromwell Road and Outdoor Plus’ Vauxhall Cross.
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Note: Outdoor Media Centre; AA/Warc. Source: AA/Warc Expenditure Report.
“Importantly, the footprint of digital has expanded geographically, including JCDecaux’s Trinity Leeds, Mediaco’s Citylive sites in Manchester, as well as new sites in Newcastle (Ocean), Birmingham (Signature) and Glasgow (Forrest) and Cardiff (blowUP).
“Advertisers continue to find a place for outdoor on their schedules, and the number of million-pound clients now stands at 159. Route, our audience measurement system, now covers just about all the environments.”
According to the Route research carried out by the Outdoor Media Centre (and also published in topline form as part of the Expenditure Report), roadside panels accounted for 28.4% of all out of home panels monitored in March this year (372,818 panels). The next biggest formats were tube carriage interiors at 24.4% and bus panels at 18.1%, as detailed in the chart below.
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Source: Route, Outdoor Media Centre; AA/Warc.
Via: MediaTel

Posterscope Hires Starcom's Huber for Comms

Posterscope has appointed Starcom MediaVest Group marketing and communications director Gill Huber to the newly created post of group communications director.
She will lead communications strategy across the out-of-home company’s three brands, Posterscope UK, PSI and psLive.
Huber spent 11 years at Starcom rising to her current role from her current position from her post as business director at the agency. Prior to Starcom she worked at OMD and BBJ.
Huber said: “Posterscope UK, PSI and psLive are delivering some of the most exciting, game-changing campaigns across the globe, so aligning communications across each brand will be vital as the group enters its next phase of growth.”
Annie Rickard, chief executive of Posterscope, said: “This newly created role marks the next stage in Posterscope’s evolution. Gill’s extensive experience aligning media and communications strategy across multiple markets makes her an invaluable leader as we grow our global footprint.”
Huber will join Posterscope in August.
Via: M&M Global

Location Tech and Mobile Map Out Way to Better Business

Surbiton would not normally be thought of as a centre of fashion.
But it is, according to location data analysts at least.

This south west London suburb, home to BBC TV’s fictional Stella Street celebrities, is where young people are more likely to check out fashion sites and apps on their smartphones than almost anywhere else in the UK.

The surprising insight comes from mobile phone network EE, which has collated terabytes of anonymised and aggregated data on more than 20 million UK customers – data that is proving increasingly valuable to retailers and advertisers.
The internet has been a godsend for marketers – enabling them to track our online behaviour to the nth degree.
Now location data from mobiles and other sources has added a whole new layer of detail to the picture – a step-change analogous to the move from videotape to DVD.
“Location analytics are becoming integral to every business strategy,” says David Brussin, chief executive of Monetate, a digital marketing company.
Poster boys and girls
US marketing pioneer John Wanamaker once famously said: “Half the money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is, I don’t know which half.”
Location analytics is helping to solve that conundrum.
Out-of-home (OOH) advertisers and agencies – those responsible for ads on billboards, bus stops and other physical locations – now know what type of person is passing a specific location at any one time, and what they are doing online.
They can then target their ads accordingly.
“Thanks to location data we now understand the relevance and value of a particular advertising position compared with another,” says James Davies, chief strategy officer at OOH agency Posterscope.
“For instance, commuters at one station may tend to look at financial apps on their phones, whereas people travelling from another station may prefer fashion apps,” he says.
“Knowing this helps advertisers ensure their ads are relevant, which saves money and improves effectiveness.”
With brands spending nearly £1bn a year on outdoor advertising in the UK, relevance is key to getting more bang for your marketing buck.
Posterscope says its partnership with EE has seen advertising effectiveness triple for some of its clients, who include Lenovo, Nationwide and British Gas.
“We now know which bus stop is better than another on the same street,” says Mr Davies.
Music for you
The mobile phone is not only an excellent tool for locating consumers, it is also an increasingly effective way for brands to interact with them.
When people move into a particular zone – crossing a geo-fence as the jargon has it – marketers can send highly targeted offers to their phones – ads relevant to their age, interests and purchasing histories.
For example, during last year’s Proms music festival, which centred around South Kensington’s Royal Albert Hall, Decca Records sent text messages to classical music lovers in the locality offering them free track downloads of artists featured in that night’s programme.
At first, the campaign looked liked proving a damp squib – the geo-fenced area was too narrowly focused around the venue.
But as soon as this was widened to include nearby tube stations, the response rate improved dramatically, the company says.
The campaign illustrated how location analytics could help reach an older demographic that is normally hard to engage, argues Sean O’Connell, director of product and technology at Weve, a joint venture between mobile phone networks Telefonica, Vodafone and EE.
Weve provided Decca’s location-based customer data and helps many other businesses with their marketing campaigns. About 60% of its campaigns in 2013 “included a location element”, says Mr O’Connell.
“The Decca campaign shows how specific and bespoke your marketing can be. And you get much more engagement with this type of marketing – click metrics improve three or four times,” says Mr O’Connell.
Personalised offers
“Location and context aware offers are going to change the world,” says John Bates, chief marketing strategy officer of big data specialist Software AG.
“Say you’re walking past a designer shoe store, you could receive a mobile ad offering a 30% discount off Jimmy Choos if you come in within the next 30 minutes and use a particular credit card.

“This is how the High Street can fight back against Amazon,” he adds. “The real world is fighting back against the virtual world – it’s personalisation on a massive scale.”

Monetate’s David Brussin agrees, saying: “A retailer can offer customers a promotion online, via email or on mobile, which changes dynamically based on their location, highlighting the shop physically closest to them and directing them to visit, and ultimately buy.”
But this kind of highly personalised marketing will only work if consumers are happy to trade some privacy in return for the benefits, Mr O’Connell believes.
“All such services are opt-in,” he says. “Customers give their permission to be indentified. With location technologies, being able to say no is of paramount importance.”
Smart maps
Location data can also help businesses map out ways to improve – literally.
For example, Esri, a specialist in location data mapping, mashes together all sorts of data – censuses, social media streams, weather, land surveys – then adds in location data gleaned from wi-fi, phone masts, GPS, and card transactions.
“Static data is being enhanced by real-time data, and this is making maps dynamic,” says Sharon Grufferty, head of software-as-a-service product management for Esri UK.
“Companies can locate hotspots of Twitter sentiment on a map, for example, and pinpoint where a problem exists, enabling them to tackle it quickly,” she adds.
Such analysis is helping insurers assess household risk far more accurately, energy companies pick the ideal place for a wind farm, and retailers plan their stores, says Ms Grufferty.
For example, retailer Argos, part of Home Retail Group, used Esri’s location mapping expertise to help it decide the best locations for its “click-and-collect” centres, based on in-depth analysis of online and in-store customer behaviour and geo-demographics.
The underperforming, badly located stores were jettisoned, while new and existing stores were stocked more efficiently to suit the local clientele.
“Home Retail Group have been long-term users of mapping software and insight,” says Andrew Stringer, the company’s customer and market insight controller.
“It helps to identify more areas where we can offer great convenience to our customers.”
These days, the old adage “location, location, location” seems to apply as much to business as it does to property investment.
Via: BBC News

Outdoor Plus Screens to Show Geoff Shreeves World Cup Tweets

Outdoor Plus has partnered with the Sky Sports reporter Geoff Shreeves to screen his live Twitter predictions for the World Cup across six of its digital sites in London.

Shreeves’ match predictions will also appear in Outdoor Plus’ network of digital screens at 16 shopping malls across the UK, including Bluewater.
From today Outdoor Plus will screen Shreeves’ tweets across its outdoor sites in London, including at the Euston Road underpass, at Vauxhall Cross interchange and City of London Gateway in Aldgate, during the morning and evening rush hours.
Shreeves, a touchline reporter for Sky News, will tweet tips throughout the World Cup tournament to the 274,000 followers of his @Geoffshreeves Twitter handle.
Outdoor Plus hopes the partnership will highlight the way brands can use social media on its digital screens to drive consumer engagement, which it said was vital because 80 per cent of Twitter users tweet while they are out of their homes.
Fifa estimates that around 3.2 billion people will watch at least some part of the World Cup and that the final will have approximately 1.3 billion viewers.
Via: Media Week

Tfl and ESPN FC to Display World Cup Updates on London Underground

Transport for London (Tfl) has partnered with ESPN’s football website, ESPN FC, to deliver football results to London Underground commuters during the World Cup – marking the first time the transport body has signed a commercial partnership.
The partnership will see Tfl and ESPN FC bring news, results and score updates from the games to more than 140 stations via overhead platform boards and 400 service update boards displayed at station entrances.
As part of the partnership, which launches on 12 June, ESPN FC will run an advertising campaign on the home page and journey planner section of the Tfl website, as well as experiential activity involving football freestylers at Stratford, Charing Cross and Tottenham Court Road stations later this week.
Via: The Drum

Read All About it on Paper Towels

To drive more people to its website, Mexican free newspaper Mas Por Mas rigged some paper towel dispensers to print out the latest real-time news.
Working together with agency FCB Mexico, they installed printers inside selected paper towel dispensers, and connected them via WiFi to the paper’s daily newsfeed.
Each time the dispensers detected a person’s hand, they would print out the latest news on the paper towels. Using special powered ink, the printed news won’t leave any stains on the person’s hands.
On each print-out is also a QR code that directs people to the newspaper’s website. According to the video below, the campaign was a success; unique visitors to the website increased by 37% in the first two weeks.
[youtube width=”300px” height=”200px”]sfjFgFYBEmA[/youtube]
Via: Design Taxi