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These concrete dog statues drew attention to a tragic pattern many were overlooking

When you see a dog tied to a lamppost, park bench or bicycle rack, you expect its owner to return soon and take the animal home.
It wouldn’t occur to most of us that such dogs might, in fact, simply have been abandoned.
But it happens all too often. For example, some 1,400 pets , including 760 dogs, were discarded on the streets of Barcelona last year. That’s a 13 percent increase from 2016.
To raise awareness of the issue and fetch new owners for some of the 200 critters awaiting adoption in city shelters, Ogilvy Barcelona placed 20 life-sized concrete dog statues around town on behalf of the City Council.
Tethered to posts, polls and other urban structures, the figures were cast from 3-D printed molds by Ingi Guðjónsson, product designer at Fab Lab Barcelona and the Institute of Advanced Architecture Catalonia. Each statue includes an ID tag with a code that links to the City Council’s animal welfare site, where viewers can get information about real furry friends in desperate need of loving homes.
Two shelter dogs—4-year-old mixed-breed Neula and 5-year-old American Staffordshire Samsó—served as models for the statues.
“Neula and Samsó represent all the dogs that have been waiting a second chance,” says Jofre Banquells, creative director of Ogilvy Barcelona. “They both waited for at least a year at Barcelona’s animal shelter. Fortunately, Neula has been quickly adopted as soon as the campaign has been launched (on April 9).”
Of course, the pet adoption issue has generated plenty of notable work in recent years. Such efforts include Pedigree’s lauded films from 2015 about ex-cons whose lives changed for the better after they began caring for dogs, and the brand’s flip-the-script take from last year that showed humans longing to escape cramped shelter cages. In January, two different appeals used music playlists as a focal point, one from Spotify, and another from Dallas Pets Alive.

“Installing the dogs attached to lampposts, as if they were really abandoned, helps people visualize the situation. People don’t only see a dog, they see the problem.”
Jofre Banquells, creative director, Ogilvy Barcelona

Dubbed “Dogs S.O.S.,” the Barcelona City Council effort cuts especially close to the bone by confronting people where the problem occurs and challenging them to become part of the solution.
“Installing the dogs attached to lampposts, as if they were really abandoned, helps people visualize the situation,” Banquells says. “People don’t only see a dog, they see the problem. In addition, it gained media attention with no investment at all.”
The sculptures will sit and stay on the streets another week, then move to other public spaces, such as libraries.
Via: AdWeek

Knowledge ages quickly, as shown by this billboard that grew mold on a classic marketing book

There’s still much to be learned from books written by the great minds of advertising’s golden age, but it’s hard to deny that almost any advice printed to the page quickly becomes dated in today’s digitally driven world.
To illustrate that point, and boost turnout at an upcoming IdeasFirst Ukrainian Marketing Forum, BBDO Ukraine created an out-of-home ad that featured a large edition of Kotler on Marketing by U.S. advertising Professor Philip Kotler. The book was slathered with millions of mold spores before being encased in an ad display at an office and commercial location.
After a few days in a “standby mode” inside the display, the mold grew rapidly and covered the book in a distorting layer of fuzz and discoloration. The result was oddly and disturbingly beautiful in its own way, and as you can see from the case study below, it certainly drew plenty of attention.

Creating a way to grow mold rapidly in a public display proved to be quite a challenge, the agency says. Here’s a summary of the process, provided by BBDO Ukraine:

“In order to get the project to work, we prepared a special layout for the book with perforations for moisture. We experimented to find a material that would allow the mold to spread. We created an environment that was conducive to growing the desired mold while preventing harmful bacteria from disrupting the mold growth. After several unsuccessful attempts, we had to completely abandon the use of toxic materials. We dried out a couple of mold populations and were forced to redesign the citylight panel’s wall construction. This helped create the ideal microclimate, from the illumination to the humidity to the temperature. In short, it was much more difficult than just leaving out a loaf of bread for a week and getting results.”
It’s worth noting this is one of the few ad campaigns you’ll see where the credits include a microbiologist.
The project’s self-destructive nature has sparked a few criticisms, according to the creatives who worked on it.
“We are faced with a wave of haters, adherents of classical marketing and fans of Kotler who think that we scoff at something holy,” BBDO Ukraine creative director Den Keleberdenko tells Adweek. “At the same time, we stirred up new generation of marketers who are open to the world and innovation in marketing.”
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Via: AdWeek

Burger King offer free Whoppers to good samaritans

In celebration of Good Samaritan Day (March 13th),  Burger King placed a smoking, flaming car on the side of a road, as a crew member stood flagging down passersbys for help. Those who stopped to lend a hand were greeted with a fun surprise – The King was flame-grilling Whopper sandwiches under the hood of his custom ride. Good samaritans who accepted the invite to stick around and enjoy a flame-grilled Whopper sandwich were reminded of what’s true for all of us: good things come to those who do good.
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Via: Best Ads on TV

Deliveroo creates edible billboard out of burgers

The activation launched for one day only outside The Old Truman Brewery in Shoreditch, London, yesterday.
The burgers were handed out for free as part of the brand’s “Eat more amazing” campaign.
Emily Kraftman, Deliveroo’s head of marketing, said: “As well as the big mass media we’re having with TV and out-of-home, actually physically bringing that to life and having a chance to interact with people and giving them great food feels like a really important part of that strategy.”
She added: “We’re looking at across the UK at how we can bring the campaign to life and interact with more consumers.”
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Via: Campaign Live

Motorola's experiment gets people to rethink their 'phone/life' balance

The average person spends 4 hours a day staring at their phones. To make people rethink how much time they spend on their smartphones, Ogilvy & Mather, New York createdhyperrealistic statues and set up an unprecedented experiment for Motorola.
Via: Best Ads on TV

Snickers opened a Valentine’s Day restaurant, for couples who forgot to make reservations

Sometimes, albeit rarely, it pays to forget it’s Valentine’s Day.
This was true for some lucky couples in London yesterday who had slacked off and failed to make restaurant reservations for the romantic holiday. Thankfully, Snickers had their back—as the Mars candy brand tends to do every Valentine’s Day—by opening its own restaurant catering exclusively to forgetful couples.
Working with agency AMV BBDO, Snickers parked a Valentine’s van on Shoreditch High Street and posed the question “Need a table for tonight?” Passersby could grab a reservation card off the van, good for a table for two at an exclusive pop-up restaurant called Oublié—a fancy sounding word that means forgotten in French.
Oublié turned out to be quite the special place. The three-course dinners were entirely complimentary, and were made by “one of London’s top chefs.” (The chef’s identity is so far unknown.)
“The stunt again reminded passersby that Snickers is on hand to help the hungry and forgetful on Valentine’s Day,” the brand said in a statement.

The activation follows a similar idea last year, in which Snickers put up a billboard outside London’s Waterloo train station that read “You’re forgetful when you’re hungry.” The headline was made from dozens of Valentine’s Day cards that passersby could pull off the ad and give to their loved one.

Knockoff Diesel store in New York is actually a real Diesel store in disguise

Here’s a brilliant little stunt from Publicis New York timed to Fashion Week New York—a storefront on Canal Street called Deisel that appears to be a blatant knock-off store, but which is actually an official Diesel store in disguise.
Canal Street, of course, is home to a notoriously sprawling marketplace of knock-off goods. Counterfeit Diesel products wouldn’t be out of place at all there—which is why it’s such a clever idea for Diesel to open what is probably the world’s first authentic knock-off store.
The video below, taken when the store opened briefly a few days ago, offers a pretty amusing look at how shoppers reacted to the Deisel clerks’ protestations that the cheap merch is actually the real thing.
What’s even better is that the concept is perfectly on brand. Diesel last year launched a global campaign around celebrating flaws—a campaign that saw this new spot launch a few weeks ago. And the Deisel products—actual high quality goods, but with a glaringly bogus logo—fit wonderfully into that positioning.
The shoppers who bought the seemingly bogus goods were in for quite a surprise, too: The pieces were one-of-a-kind, specially crafted by Diesel design team, and “very likely to become collector’s items,” the brand says. We have no idea what effect this move will have on the actual problem of knock-offs, but it’s crazy fun for a global brand to embrace that netherworld in such a creative way.
The brand even goes further and salutes the Deisel buyers, who gladly absconded with what they believed were fake goods, for being “brave enough to venture off the beaten path to find their own unique style.”
The store is back open today (Feb. 9) through Monday, for anyone who wants to run over there and pick up some deals.
“Only a brand with a fierce legacy of innovation has the courage to storm Fashion Week conventions with a knock-off brand, sold street-wear style, on Canal Street,” Andy Bird, chief creative officer at Publicis New York, said in a statement. “Diesel has been breaking conventions in the fashion world for 40 years. Here they are again, taking a direct-to-consumer twist on fashion marketing, smack in the center of one of the largest fashion-centric events in the world. Now that’s a real fashion statement.”
“When we were young creatives we only had one dream—working with Diesel,” Publicis New York executive creative directors Luca Lorenzini and Luca Pannese said in a joint statement. “We were literally in love with anything that was coming from them, both in fashion and advertising. And now we’ve been lucky enough to finally work with them. Pushing the boundaries of creativity is easier when you work with someone who has being doing it for years. Canal Street is not exactly the location you think of when it comes to New York Fashion Week. Only a brand that’s been challenging conventions since the beginning, like Diesel, could literally take this road less traveled.”
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Via: AdWeek

Range Rover Evoque navigates world's largest speedbump

Despite its rough-and-tumble offroad pedigree, most modern Land Rovers will never actually see mud. Instead, they’ll spend their entire lives navigating busy metropolitan streets and luxury shopping center parking lots. Apparently, Land Rover knows this as well, as evidenced by the company’s latest Evoque promotional video in which the compact SUV isn’t seen tackling sand dunes or a swampy forest, but the largest speed bump in the world.
After proving impenetrable by a wide variety of less-capable vehicles, including one BMW X3 whose flustered owner concedes, “I’m not sure it’s that good a 4×4,” a wild Range Rover Evoque owner appears, predictably showing everybody how it’s done. Cue the flabbergasted and deeply impressed onlookers.

LastMinute.com create experiment to show that money can't buy experiences

Can you put a price on your experiences? Travel website Lastminute.com decided to remind us by offering people a (fictional) choice: your memories or a whole lot of money.
In a stunt by the brand, volunteers were asked to take part in a “scientific experiment” and hooked up to brain activity measurement equipment. They were asked to recall a treasured memory about a trip they’d taken. Then, they were asked if they would allow the coordinator to delete that memory, in return for a hefty cash fee. The answer is a unanimous “no.” “What are we without our memories?” asks one guy quite reasonably after recalling an amazing trip to Macchu Pichu.
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Via: AdAge

Amazon surprises customers in 'motorised' coffee shop stunt

Thinkmodo sure loves its cafés.
The stunt-based viral video agency had an early hit with 2013’s “Telekinetic Coffee Shop Surprise,” in which a girl surprised unsuspecting patrons with some freaky telekinetic superpowers (to promote the horror movie Carrie). They also did a Spider-Man coffee-shop stunt earlier this year.
Now, Thinkmodo returns to a New York City coffee-shop setting for “The Grand Tour Café,” in which patrons once again get a big shock—this time in a good way. Because those aren’t your regular chairs, couches, coffee tables and ottomans.
Yes, it’s an Amazon prank promoting the return of its original motoring series The Grand Tour for Season 2 on Dec. 8. Thinkmodo tells us the video has over 2 million total Facebook views in 24 hours.
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Via: AdWeek

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