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Snickers opened a Valentine’s Day restaurant, for couples who forgot to make reservations

Sometimes, albeit rarely, it pays to forget it’s Valentine’s Day.
This was true for some lucky couples in London yesterday who had slacked off and failed to make restaurant reservations for the romantic holiday. Thankfully, Snickers had their back—as the Mars candy brand tends to do every Valentine’s Day—by opening its own restaurant catering exclusively to forgetful couples.
Working with agency AMV BBDO, Snickers parked a Valentine’s van on Shoreditch High Street and posed the question “Need a table for tonight?” Passersby could grab a reservation card off the van, good for a table for two at an exclusive pop-up restaurant called Oublié—a fancy sounding word that means forgotten in French.
Oublié turned out to be quite the special place. The three-course dinners were entirely complimentary, and were made by “one of London’s top chefs.” (The chef’s identity is so far unknown.)
“The stunt again reminded passersby that Snickers is on hand to help the hungry and forgetful on Valentine’s Day,” the brand said in a statement.

The activation follows a similar idea last year, in which Snickers put up a billboard outside London’s Waterloo train station that read “You’re forgetful when you’re hungry.” The headline was made from dozens of Valentine’s Day cards that passersby could pull off the ad and give to their loved one.

Knockoff Diesel store in New York is actually a real Diesel store in disguise

Here’s a brilliant little stunt from Publicis New York timed to Fashion Week New York—a storefront on Canal Street called Deisel that appears to be a blatant knock-off store, but which is actually an official Diesel store in disguise.
Canal Street, of course, is home to a notoriously sprawling marketplace of knock-off goods. Counterfeit Diesel products wouldn’t be out of place at all there—which is why it’s such a clever idea for Diesel to open what is probably the world’s first authentic knock-off store.
The video below, taken when the store opened briefly a few days ago, offers a pretty amusing look at how shoppers reacted to the Deisel clerks’ protestations that the cheap merch is actually the real thing.
What’s even better is that the concept is perfectly on brand. Diesel last year launched a global campaign around celebrating flaws—a campaign that saw this new spot launch a few weeks ago. And the Deisel products—actual high quality goods, but with a glaringly bogus logo—fit wonderfully into that positioning.
The shoppers who bought the seemingly bogus goods were in for quite a surprise, too: The pieces were one-of-a-kind, specially crafted by Diesel design team, and “very likely to become collector’s items,” the brand says. We have no idea what effect this move will have on the actual problem of knock-offs, but it’s crazy fun for a global brand to embrace that netherworld in such a creative way.
The brand even goes further and salutes the Deisel buyers, who gladly absconded with what they believed were fake goods, for being “brave enough to venture off the beaten path to find their own unique style.”
The store is back open today (Feb. 9) through Monday, for anyone who wants to run over there and pick up some deals.
“Only a brand with a fierce legacy of innovation has the courage to storm Fashion Week conventions with a knock-off brand, sold street-wear style, on Canal Street,” Andy Bird, chief creative officer at Publicis New York, said in a statement. “Diesel has been breaking conventions in the fashion world for 40 years. Here they are again, taking a direct-to-consumer twist on fashion marketing, smack in the center of one of the largest fashion-centric events in the world. Now that’s a real fashion statement.”
“When we were young creatives we only had one dream—working with Diesel,” Publicis New York executive creative directors Luca Lorenzini and Luca Pannese said in a joint statement. “We were literally in love with anything that was coming from them, both in fashion and advertising. And now we’ve been lucky enough to finally work with them. Pushing the boundaries of creativity is easier when you work with someone who has being doing it for years. Canal Street is not exactly the location you think of when it comes to New York Fashion Week. Only a brand that’s been challenging conventions since the beginning, like Diesel, could literally take this road less traveled.”
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Via: AdWeek

Range Rover Evoque navigates world's largest speedbump

Despite its rough-and-tumble offroad pedigree, most modern Land Rovers will never actually see mud. Instead, they’ll spend their entire lives navigating busy metropolitan streets and luxury shopping center parking lots. Apparently, Land Rover knows this as well, as evidenced by the company’s latest Evoque promotional video in which the compact SUV isn’t seen tackling sand dunes or a swampy forest, but the largest speed bump in the world.
After proving impenetrable by a wide variety of less-capable vehicles, including one BMW X3 whose flustered owner concedes, “I’m not sure it’s that good a 4×4,” a wild Range Rover Evoque owner appears, predictably showing everybody how it’s done. Cue the flabbergasted and deeply impressed onlookers.

LastMinute.com create experiment to show that money can't buy experiences

Can you put a price on your experiences? Travel website Lastminute.com decided to remind us by offering people a (fictional) choice: your memories or a whole lot of money.
In a stunt by the brand, volunteers were asked to take part in a “scientific experiment” and hooked up to brain activity measurement equipment. They were asked to recall a treasured memory about a trip they’d taken. Then, they were asked if they would allow the coordinator to delete that memory, in return for a hefty cash fee. The answer is a unanimous “no.” “What are we without our memories?” asks one guy quite reasonably after recalling an amazing trip to Macchu Pichu.
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Via: AdAge

Amazon surprises customers in 'motorised' coffee shop stunt

Thinkmodo sure loves its cafés.
The stunt-based viral video agency had an early hit with 2013’s “Telekinetic Coffee Shop Surprise,” in which a girl surprised unsuspecting patrons with some freaky telekinetic superpowers (to promote the horror movie Carrie). They also did a Spider-Man coffee-shop stunt earlier this year.
Now, Thinkmodo returns to a New York City coffee-shop setting for “The Grand Tour Café,” in which patrons once again get a big shock—this time in a good way. Because those aren’t your regular chairs, couches, coffee tables and ottomans.
Yes, it’s an Amazon prank promoting the return of its original motoring series The Grand Tour for Season 2 on Dec. 8. Thinkmodo tells us the video has over 2 million total Facebook views in 24 hours.
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Via: AdWeek

German supermarket removes all foreign products from shelves to show daily life without diversity

What does a grocery store look like without Greek olives, Spanish tomatoes and frozen goods from who-knows-where?
You’re about to find out.
To emphasize the importance of global diversity in a context everyone can understand, German supermarket Edeka made a surprising decision: It emptied its Hamburg location of all foreign-made products.
For shoppers wandering around confused, signs featured messages like, “So empty is a shelf without foreigners,” “This shelf is quite boring without variety,” “Our range now knows borders,” and, “We will be poorer without diversity.”

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People mostly believe what their range of experience permits. Protectionist policy thrives on such blind spots: It’s easy to be racist when the groups you’re demonizing are abstractions.
That’s what gives this work its oomph—nothing is more personal than access to and preferences for food, which guarantee a visceral emotional reaction.
Hamburg is the second most populous city in Germany, behind Berlin, with resident aliens composing nearly 15 percent of the population. But German opinion’s become pretty tense since Chancellor Angela Merkel announced an open-door immigration policy for refugees two years ago.
The decision led to the arrival of 890,000 asylum seekers in 2015 alone … and early this year, Germany announced plans to roll the policy back. (The stance did, however, boost Germany’s prominence on the global stage.)
Online, vice chair of the Christian Democratic Union Party Julia Klöckner praised the campaign, calling it “a wise action” that would give people pause. The comment generated a bevy of replies, including one from Marcus Pretzell (no longer visible), representing an immigrant-hostile party, Alternative for Germany: “Why exactly should it be wise? Is it not rather completely mad?” he was quoted as saying, per The Independent.
Edeka’s got a reputation for producing the kind of quirky, unhinged advertising creatives look forward to. (2014’s much-lauded “Supergeil” comes to mind.) If you’re wondering why it would suddenly break tone to make a political stance this dramatic, consider that its work often has a moral bent.
In a 2015 Christmas ad, an old patriarch fakes his own death to compel his family to gather for the season. 2016’s holiday ad used an anti-consumerist message to remind people that being together is more important than gifts. And the controversial “Eatkarus” ad of 2017 is, at its heart, a story about embracing a path that alienates you from others—especially when you’re doing it for your own health and happiness.
“Edeka stands for variety and diversity,” an Edeka spokesperson said of the Hamburg activation. “In our stores we sell numerous foods which are produced in the various regions of Germany. … But only together, with products from other countries, it is possible to create the unique variety that our consumers value. We are pleased that our campaign caused so many positive reactions.”
Via: AdWeek

Children sculpted in sugar in Times Square to highlight unhealthy eating habits

Anybody who passed through Times Square this morning likely noticed a giant mound of sugar and an array of children sculpted of the sweetener. Kind, the company that makes the all-natural fruit and nut bar, is behind the stunt. To make a statement about the amount of sugar children consume, Kind put 45,485 pounds of it—a 20-foot tall, 30-foot wide pile to be exact—smack dab in the middle of Times Square. 
The move isn’t altruistic: Kind is touting its new fruit snacks, Kind Fruit Bites, which contain just fruit and no added sugar, according to the brand. An in-house creative team came up with the idea for the 45,485 pound mound of sugar to represent how much sugar kids in the U.S. eat every five minutes. 
“Since day one, Kind has been committed to balancing health and taste,” said Daniel Lubetzky, founder and CEO of Kind, in a statement, adding that, Kind “craft[s] snacks with a nutritionally-dense first ingredient.”

According to data from market research company IRI, children in the U.S. consume 80 grams (19 teaspoons) of added sugar per day. The American Heart Association recommends limiting sugar to 25 grams per day. Based on that data, Kind found that “in one year the average 9-year-old is eating his or her body weight in added sugar.” The company, along with Magnetic Collaborative, constructed the sugar children to show what it looks like when children consume their body weight in sugar.
Kind isn’t against sugar,” said Drew Nannis, head of integrated communications for Kind, when asked about the sugar content of Kind’s products. “We believe indulgences are great and should be enjoyed. What we don’t advocate for, are snacks being perceived as healthy, but in fact, are primarily from sugar.”
Nassis added: “Our best-selling snack line, Nuts and Spices, has 4-5 grams of total sugar per bar, which is 50 percent less total sugar per bar compared to the average nutrition bar. We make snacks that are wholesome and delicious, and we’ve maintained a longstanding commitment to using as little sugar as possible without compromising taste. …  We also want to make it easier for parents to make more informed choices which is why we released the added sugar content across our portfolio last year.” 
Via: AdWeek
 

Tequila fountains pop up in L.A to celebrate National Tequila Day

To mark National Tequila Day, Jose Cuervo replaced water in drinking fountains around Los Angeles with chilled tequila to help (of age) passersby cure their Monday blues.

Tequila brand Jose Cuervo encourages all to fight the bland, live lively and embrace the now because tomorrow is overrated. In line with this thinking, the brand provided shots of its Cuervo Silver product from a H2Cuervo water fountain located at the Hollywood and Highland Centre from 12pm until 6pm on the 24th of July.
A European-style garden fountain was also installed on the outdoor terrace of iconic hangout The Abbey in the city.
The fountain was open to anyone with ID who could prove they were aged 21 or over.
Via: Event Magazine 

‘Lost Cobra’ billboards scare up foot traffic to San Francisco retail store

A San Francisco clothing store is drumming up foot traffic with an unusual approach—nine ominous billboards about a lost cobra.
“Our beloved Mr. Chips has gone missing,” reads the copy, next to a giant black and white picture of a snake. “Please help this sweet boy get back to the Betabrand store before before the mongooses find him.”
An online crowd-funding brand that focuses on clothing, Betabrand has a brick-and-mortar location on 780 Valencia Street. Sadly, Mr. Chips is not real. Happily, the company has not let an actual cobra loose on the city. But the billboards, scattered around the tech-saturated area, are producing predictably amused (and anxious) reactions on Twitter.
It’s a clever little stunt, playing on classic DIY posts about generally less reptilian pets. Plus, the campaign is clearly delivering results. In what is sure to be the best ROI metric of the year, SFGate cites a Betabrand spokesperson saying the billboard is driving “plenty” of people into the retail location, “including one individual purporting to be [Mr. Chips’] biological father.”

It’s not clear, though, whether the store’s new visitors ran in screaming at the top of their lungs, as if fleeing a venomous serpent.
Via: Ad Week

'Human Billboard' tattooed with insults highlights pre-election racism in France

French anti-racism organisation Le Conseil Representatif des Associations Noires (Le CRAN) highlighted the country’s ongoing racism problems ahead of the country’s Election last month, by sending a man through the streets of Paris tattooed in racist insults.
Agency Leo Burnett Paris collated the racist insults and names included in the tattoos via social media, interviews with celebrities and audio testimonials. On April 24, Le CRAN sent the man out into crowded areas of the city to hand out leaflets, and encouraged people to tweet about it with the hashtag #jeffaceleracisme. With National Front leader Marine Le Pen running for President at the time, it was a timely stunt.
“We want to alert the French to racist insults, the impact of which is often underestimated,” explained Louis Georges Tin, president of Le CRAN, in a statement.
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Via: Creativity Online