What’s Next for Out of Home?

Roman Greze, MD of Limited Space, discusses what he thinks is next for the Out-of-Home industry.
Out of home (OOH) advertising has made unparalleled leaps in capability and greater creative thinking, it has the power to captivate target consumers to a higher degree. Innovation and technology have raised the stakes in how advertisers deploy OOH to accelerate and amplify online, social and mobile advertising campaigns by allowing consumers to interact and transact with brands.
The potential of OOH lies in its ubiquity to reach consumers where other media don’t go. When layered on top with screen technology like interactive touch screens, near field communications (NFC), and a host of other advanced technologies like geo-targeting and augmented reality, advertisers can interact, to create genuine, two-way brand relationships.
Outdoor drives a better online search uplift than TV in some sectors, showing a 5.5 per cent increase in travel search terms versus 3.5 per cent for TV and a 3 per cent uplift for insurance keywords compared with TV’s 0.6 per cent, claims The Outdoor Media Centre.
Digital and NFC-enabled sites, or those offering free wifi, have made OOH much more responsive and in real-time. The use of interactive displays has allowed OOH campaigns to tie into digital and online campaigns well. Compared to traditional OOH campaigns, using interactive displays on LED screens and other formats allow companies to increase their chance of conversions by promoting more instant interactions with the customer. LED technology is also expected to play a big part in this shift, as it’s great for viewing from long distances; it also allows for interactive capability and will be implemented across different locations from shopping malls to highway billboards.
Twitter is an obvious choice for putting social engagement at the centre of interactivity. During the curling final at the Sochi Winter Olympics, Cadbury Curly Wurly ran a tactical digital campaign with the catchline: “The difference between a curling stone and a Curly Wurly: you don’t let go of a Curly Wurly.” This was broadcast in real time so that drivers could see the image change while listening to the curling final on their car radios.
Weather is a popular theme that carries through some of the most successful campaigns. Land Rover recently launched their #hibernot campaign using digital posters to engage consumers by encouraging people to get out and enjoy all the elements of a British winter. The brand used the OOH element to provide a ‘reward’ for those engaging with the campaign by using their images on the digital outdoor posters. Ford recently ran a ‘thermal geo-targeting’ campaign where the image that appears on screens changes with the temperature and with rain, sleet or snow.
So what’s next for OOH? Apart from interaction and digital displays there are many strategies being applied online that will soon be helping OOH advertising innovate once again. For example, social media platforms such as Foursquare have already begun letting customers check into displays and receive corresponding benefits. This allows for different deals to be given out at different locations, which relates back to targeting. The use of interactive screens will also allow OOH campaigns to seed further into digital and online campaigns as well. Imagine social media contests and check-ins, being combined with displays in places like shopping centres where brands can directly boost spend. This cross-platform marketing would allow for companies to experience a level of interaction with customers and deliver potential for conversion that’s been previously unattainable for a long time.
The quality of technology has helped boost the capability of brands to target consumers through engaging their senses. Digital screen sites, for instance, deliver cinema-quality digital content, a static full screen surround artwork wrap and full zonal sound audio to fully engage with shoppers through multiple stimuli. Ensuring that the location is on the shoppers’ journey is important here too because they’ll already be in the right frame of mind and be more receptive to entertainment. When a watch brand wants to target shoppers, what better place to elicit engagement than with screens in a shopping mall minutes away from an H.M.Samuel or Goldsmiths?
There is a magical gap between what people expect from OOH and what they experience. Consumers now expect a dynamic experience from their smart phones and televisions but when they see an OOH board they expect the same fixed reality. This is where the OOH market is beginning to change. The landscape is the perfect delivery medium for more bespoke and creative experiences and can fully embrace these new technologies in an age where the value of targeting consumers when their senses are open to movements in ads cannot be underestimated.
Via: The Wall Blog